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29 replies to this topic

#16 GFestes

 
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Posted 06 March 2012 - 12:25 PM

I'm a chicken. I order eggs hard-fried so I can see that there is egg and nothing else. :lol: A little bacon (I have never seen gluten in bacon) and gluten-free toast from my purse and I'm good to go. I'll do that at pretty much any greasy spoon.


As we understand it, bacon, ham, and sausage can attract gluten during the curing process. Fillers may be added to meat (most notably sausage). Turkey may be injected with gluten (to appear plump). Marinades may be used on any prepared meat. We have only come across bacon containing gluten once. It was an inexpensive package in a house brand. I read all labels -- including those in restaurants that do not have an acceptable gluten free protocol in place.
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#17 TAHBomba

 
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Posted 02 April 2012 - 09:38 PM

I know the general manager of the IHOP that I frequent. I always ask if she is there and if not... can they tell her "hi" for me. I order the egg white omelettes with and no cheese. I get grits (ground hominy) and fruit instead of bread. The GM made up this dish for me.

I typically go into a restaurant and order a drink and hang around and talk to the employees and managers before I order anything including a salad. I work in a restaurant and it's a running joke at work that I know the ingredients better than the manager.
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#18 mushroom

 
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Posted 03 April 2012 - 02:37 AM

We need a celiac with practical restaurant experience on here :D
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Neroli


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"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

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#19 BabsV

 
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Posted 04 April 2012 - 03:08 AM

If it weren't too expensive, Peter, I would send you some gluten-containing bacon by special delivery from New Zealand. I know it would be inedible by the time it got there, but it would be inedible for you anyway because of the gluten that would be in it. We have to check every package. Don't know if they do it in Oz too?? I have to pray that the Tooth Fairy has delivered gluten free bacon :P I have a couple of reliable bacon companies who do no gluten. Same with sausages. So even when in U.S. I automatically check all ham, bacon, hot dogs and sausages because I don't want to get out of the habit :rolleyes:


I'm in Poland and I haven't been able to easily find bacon, sausages, ham, lunch meats or hot dogs that are gluten free. I have found sausage a couple of times at one of the natural food stores but it was ridiculously expensive and tasted wretched! Add to that the fact that they add flavoringsbroths (which contain gluten) to fresh meats here and I'm on a really limited diet. Needless to say I am counting the days until our return to the US this summer so I'll have a few more options. I am really really sick of fish at this point... :)
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#20 mushroom

 
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Posted 04 April 2012 - 03:21 AM

Hope you get out of your Polish hell soon, Babs :)

There is a bright side to things. I visited a local fruiterer/butcher today, a little homegrown operation with big aspirations (well, one branch went bye-bye in the earthquakes) but they are slowly starting to expand the range of things they carry. First it was gluten free sausages and ham and bacon, then it was gluten free bread. Now, today, I find a whole gluten-free shelf of products, some of which I haven't even seen in major chains (the little guy getting the edge??). They are slowly posititioning themselves more upmarket. With any luck at all about where you live stateside, when you return you will find similar incredible leaps in the availablity of food to eat. :)
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#21 lovegrov

 
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Posted 04 April 2012 - 04:45 AM

As we understand it, bacon, ham, and sausage can attract gluten during the curing process. Fillers may be added to meat (most notably sausage). Turkey may be injected with gluten (to appear plump). Marinades may be used on any prepared meat. We have only come across bacon containing gluten once. It was an inexpensive package in a house brand. I read all labels -- including those in restaurants that do not have an acceptable gluten free protocol in place.


"Attract" gluten during the curing process? What the heck does that mean? Never heard of it.

If you know of sausages with "fillers" that contain gluten, please post them on here. I've never found one.

If you know of a turkey that's injected with anything containing gluten to "plump" them up, please post the brand here. I've never found one.

richard
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#22 CeliacAndCfsCrusader

 
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Posted 05 April 2012 - 04:32 PM

speaking of IHOP I wnet last night as we had a 2 free meals coupon from the district manager (we had a BAD experience before I went BF) - we went to a different restaurant tho LOL. Before we sat down. told the manager I was gluten-free. He said he would clean the grill. I got chicken, seasoned potatoes and broccoli. I didn't know it but the seasonings in the potatoes had gluten in them and he didn't use the seasonings!! wtg manager!!


Regarding "seasonings"; a local breakfast place here uses a small amount of Ranch Dressing flavored dry mix on their potatoes...guess what? Gluten!
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#23 CeliacAndCfsCrusader

 
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Posted 05 April 2012 - 04:34 PM

As we understand it, bacon, ham, and sausage can attract gluten during the curing process. Fillers may be added to meat (most notably sausage). Turkey may be injected with gluten (to appear plump). Marinades may be used on any prepared meat. We have only come across bacon containing gluten once. It was an inexpensive package in a house brand. I read all labels -- including those in restaurants that do not have an acceptable gluten free protocol in place.


I totally agree, for years Honey Baked Ham had wheat in the glaze.

I've seen it here in the US in sausage.

Why NOT read the label? Peace of mind is worth a lot when trying to enjoy your meal.
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#24 beebs

 
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Posted 05 April 2012 - 05:34 PM

I always moan about being gluten-free - but I have realised after reading this thread how lucky we are here in Oz. All of the store brand sausages in both of the two major supermarkets are gluten-free, including most of the other brands that goes for 99% of the ham and bacon here as well.

Must be a nightmare in places where you don't have labelling laws and where you can't get anything gluten free:(
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HLA DQ8, gluten-free since January 2011

#25 karenwill2

 
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Posted 04 May 2013 - 06:15 PM

I had been doing very well eating out lately up until my son made me try IHOP today. I had 2 eggs, hashbrowns and sausage and have been sick ever since. I checked the allergen info and supposedly, I made good choices so there must have been some mega cross contamination going on. I just wanted to warn everyone in case this is the norm for the chain. I did advise the server that I cannot have wheat so to keep toast and etc as far away from my food as possible but it still did not work. I will NOT be back.


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#26 GottaSki

 
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Posted 04 May 2013 - 06:26 PM

I had been doing very well eating out lately up until my son made me try IHOP today. I had 2 eggs, hashbrowns and sausage and have been sick ever since. I checked the allergen info and supposedly, I made good choices so there must have been some mega cross contamination going on. I just wanted to warn everyone in case this is the norm for the chain. I did advise the server that I cannot have wheat so to keep toast and etc as far away from my food as possible but it still did not work. I will NOT be back.

 

Hi Karen...I have not checked recently...but I do know IHOP has a history of adding pancake batter to their eggs to make them more fluffy...I don't see how any eggs cooked there would be safe if this is still their practice.

 

Welcome to the forum....come on in and stay a while :)


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My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

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#27 gmdavis

 
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Posted 20 June 2013 - 08:27 AM

Although I would be wary of eating at any restaurant that makes most of their food with wheat four, if you find yourself at IHOP and are willing to take the risk, they do have an allergen list posted online. 

 

http://www.ihop.com/...nformation.ashx

 

As mentioned by others, they add pancake batter to most of their omelettes. (URRGH!) But they do have 'SIMPLE & FIT Spinach, Mushroom & Tomato Omelette' without batter. You can get that with fruit and/or Hash browns are also listed as gluten free. When ordering, I would make sure to ask the waitress to be sure this is prepared safely and they don't mix up your order.

 

Others mentioned that you *could* ask for any omelette without batter but I would personally be afraid someone would forget and poison me.

 

If in doubt, stick with coffee.


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#28 kenlove

 
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Posted 20 June 2013 - 08:39 AM

I got sick by going into one by LAX when my wife wanted to eat something before getting on a plane home. 

Flour is in the air everywhere!

 

Although I would be wary of eating at any restaurant that makes most of their food with wheat four, if you find yourself at IHOP and are willing to take the risk, they do have an allergen list posted online. 

 

http://www.ihop.com/...nformation.ashx

 

As mentioned by others, they add pancake batter to most of their omelettes. (URRGH!) But they do have 'SIMPLE & FIT Spinach, Mushroom & Tomato Omelette' without batter. You can get that with fruit and/or Hash browns are also listed as gluten free. When ordering, I would make sure to ask the waitress to be sure this is prepared safely and they don't mix up your order.

 

Others mentioned that you *could* ask for any omelette without batter but I would personally be afraid someone would forget and poison me.

 

If in doubt, stick with coffee.


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#29 Salax

 
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Posted 20 June 2013 - 03:23 PM

I still think the best breakfast is at home. I make some mean hashbrowns and also it's much safer. When needing to eat the morning on the go I always carry something in my purse or I swing by the market for fruit (apple, banana, etc) It's hard not going out to breakfast but it's so much safer. But if your going to do it anyways. Don't get eggs in an omlet or scrambled. Sunny side or over medium, etc is the best option, can't put pancake batter in that and if they do, you'd know ;)


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Gall Bladder Failure - Removed July 2009,
Colitis, Hashimotos Disease, & Diverticulitis

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(")_(") Eat your vegetables!


#30 KWKSLVR

 
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Posted 02 September 2013 - 07:40 AM

iHOP is such a huge gamble. Personally, it's not worth it to me when one meal can throw me off for 2 months. I stick to restaurants that have a plan for people who need to be gluten free. I've never gotten sick from Mellow Mushroom, which makes their own pizza crust in house. They are aware of Celiac disease and have a plan to cater to those customers. I've never gotten sick from a PF Changs. They are absolutely amazing with their gluten free options and their kitchen practices.

Also, don't trust Urban Spoon. I don't know what criteria a restuarant has to have to be "Gluten Free Friendly", but it isn't much. A gluten free menu isn't enough. Several months ago we went to a Mexican Restuarant and should have known to get up and walk out when they brought me their gluten free menu which was printed on green, laminated construction paper with about 7 items out of a menu that was 4 pages long. I THOUGHT I was safe with queso and chips. Nope.

A couple months ago we went to one of my favorite local seafood restuarants that I used to frequent before getting diagnosed. I knew what I could order so I made an order and asked for no hushpuppies on my plate and no croutons on my salad. The waitress put it on the ticket and the kitchen ignored it. When I sent it back, the kitchen had a hissy fit. The poor waitress argued with them about having to throw that food out and remake the dish, which they reluctantly did.

That's not "gluten free friendly". That's inept about something so much as an allergy, much less celiac disease. The food was fine and I'm pretty sure no one spit in it. But it's not a gamble I'm willing to take again. If a restaurant doesn't want to accomodate, that's fine. But I've learned not to take Urban Spoon at face value.


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