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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Nose Bleeds
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15 posts in this topic

I know that there have been some much older threads written about nose bleeds in relation to Celiac Disease, but they haven't been updated in years, so I decided to do a new one.

I've suffered from nosebleeds all of my life, particularly in the winter. I've had particularly bad stretches where I will have up to 3-4 per day and they are very hard to stop as well. I've had the inside of my nose cauterized twice. It was extremely painful and didn't help at all. I've seen eye, nose and throat specialists who say that I have a deviated septum, but are still puzzled as to why I have them so much. Last winter was probably the worst period for me. For about 3-4 months straight, I had terrible nose bleeds that wouldn't go away. One of my doctor gave me some nose clips that I would use in these cases.

I was diagnosed with Celiac disease nearly 2 years ago. However, it's only been in the last few months that I've finally started to heal and make progress. 1 year ago when I had such bad nosebleeds, I had been on the gluten-free diet for a good 6-7 months already, but they were really bad. I often get them in the middle of the night and they wake me up.

Anyway, I've been doing much better this winter with the nosebleeds but they are still an issue, although much less so. Many of my other symptoms including weight loss, acid reflux, fatigue, acne and brain fog have improved a good deal.

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My son and I (both celiacs) have also been plagued for most of our lives with nosebleeds, though they have lessened dramatically since going gluten free eight years ago. My neighbors used to think my son had AIDS because his nose bled so often and so copiously. I assumed then, as I do now, that we were low in Vitamin K due to malabsorption. I still don't clot well, but I rarely have nosebleeds now. The nosebleeds were especially bad whenever I was pregnant, and I had to have my nose cauterized both times--but, like you, it didn't help. Usually, I'd start bleeding uncontrollably again the very next day.

My son's pediatrician suggested coating the inside of his nose with Polysporin or Neosporin, and that worked somewhat, especially in the cold months. Apparently, when the membranes get dry, they can bleed more easily. Hopefully, your nosebleeds will start to taper off, too.

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I had nosebleeds come upon me suddenly. It was the last straw that sent me to another doctor and to a diagnosis of celiac. Since then i've been supplimenting my gluten free diet with copious sprinkling of parsley (vit k). The nose bleeds went away within a month and haven't come back. Hope yours are as easily resolved.

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I was plagued with nose bleeds for years. I thought it might have been the dry climate I was in and would try to keep my nose moisturized, not sure it really helped. I stopped blowing my nose as hard and I think that did help. Infact, I try not to blow my nose unless I have to because of all the nose bleeds. I now live in a humid area and still am very careful about any pressure to my nose and I have had less issues.

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I used to get regular nosebleeds, particularly as a kid. Only once since going gluten free, and that was when my sinuses, which are also a problem, were particularly painful.

Interesting about the vitamin K.

For me, I suspected it might be linked with systemic inflammation. Another of my symptoms was painful varicose veins in my legs, and so-called "pelvic congestion", which I was told is varicose veins in the pelvic area. I've suffered from this my whole adult life, just not at a level to pester the medical profession. Since going gluten fee I've noticed that the veiny patches on my legs stopped throbbing, and the pelvic discomfort seems better too, although that is hard to distinguish from pain to ovarian cysts (which I also had) and from abdominal pain due to more classic celiac symptoms.

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My son and I, both celiacs have had problems with nosebleeds. I rarely get them since diagnosis, but for my son, they are a sure sign that he has been glutened. He is sensitive to lower levels of cc than I am. They go away again within 3 days or so upon removal of the offending food. He is on a very strict gluten free diet and every new food is added carefully, one thing per week with careful tracking of any symptoms. When a problem arises then it is time for careful eliminations.

He also gets too sick to attend school with all his other symptoms, so we don't go to all this effort just for the nosebleeds which could of course be caused by other things.

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sounds like nosebleeds are more common than I thought. I mention nosebleeds as one of my symptoms of Celiac Disease and everyone I've told is in awe and can't see how it relates to celiac disease at all. But I explain that you can have up to 300 different symptoms affecting any body part. I also used to suffer from severe and chronic yeast infections since I was 13. Those were awful. I'm now thinking it was because my immune system was low. I have no idea how long I've had celiac disease. I suspect a good portion of my 33 years of my existence. Besides the weight loss (I've gained all the weight back now, including more...) and the acid reflux, I have non-classic symptoms. Psychological problems, anxiety, brain fog, acne, bruising, restless leg syndrome, insomnia, anemia, fatigue, yeast infections, back pain, female issues among the nosebleeds. My nosebleeds come along suddenly at anytime, but often when I'm sleeping. Also when I take a shower, bend over, etc. Just had a minor one this morning. So annoying...

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My husband, who is not a celiac, has had trouble with nosebleeds his whole life. It's not as bad as you describe, but some similarities. There is definitely a connect to dry air, and to transitioning from cold to warm. (Dry, fragile vessels suddenly getting a flood of warm blood can burst.) He suspects his is partially due to what he suspects was an accidentally broken nose when he was young (5 or 6), but we'll never know. He also has mentioned using vaseline to help them, and being *very* careful about blowing his nose.

At the least, you might try a humidifier in your bedroom in the winter?

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Those nosebleeds are something else. I used to think that my son must be picking his nose to cause them, or at least initiate it. Then one time we were at the table together. His hands were nowhere near his nose and it just started gushing. I use humidifiers, and dehumidifiers and monitor the humidity and that does help somewhat. He doesn't get them too often anymore as we have gotten our diet under control.

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Yup, I also used to get terrible nosebleeds that wouldn't stop for literally hours. Looking back, there were multiple factors, including candida, dairy, and gluten. Nutritional deficiencies also played a part, though from what I can tell this was a lesser issue.

Thankfully, I haven't had even a single nosebleed in years.

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I do use a humidifier in my room and also use Ayr nasal gel, but still have nosebleeds. Like I said, they are much better now, but still come more often than I would like...

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I experienced these as a child, very embarrassing being taken out of class at school pouring with blood. Eventually homeopathy helped clear it up but I'm now thinking it may have been linked to celiac as I'm reading of several people who had it as a symptom.

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Did you also bruise easily and have you experienced tiny, pin prick like bruises?  I had both along with nosebleeds pro=ior to getting off gluten.  It was an immune disorder called idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura or immune thrombocytopenic purpura.  Look up ITP and see if it fits.

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Interesting you ask that, at my last blood test my bruising lasted ages which for someone of 29 I found really odd! When I was rushed to hospital post knee surgery the ambulance lady remarked that I was a bleeder and have always found when I get a cut it bleeds a lot and is thin.

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Ive noticed improvements since going gluten free. As to the nose bleeding, I have that to. For a year or so was pretty bad to. Anyway still have them but no where near as bad as I used to. Of course Ive only been gluten free for a few weeks. I noticed however that taking hot baths will cause nose bleeding if I stay in the tub to long. I used to sleep in the tub when taking baths for an hour or even two at a time sometimes, given the hot water is so relaxing. So if the gluten had caused problems with my sinuses, and something has, as my nose stays stopped up about all the time. During long baths it seems the fumes from chlorine irritates my nose way more causing the nose bleeding. Just mentioning a connection there between chlorine fumes effecting a nose that's already inflamed because of gluten. Seems gluten intolerance causes IBS with often diarrhea as Ive had such for a few years. Read gluten damages the intestines causing that. Along with the dizzy spells as I read gluten causes the bodies antibodies against the gluten to attack the cerebellum which causes dizzies among other things. Also read gluten intolerance causes hypertension something I have as well. And of course my per-diabetes which can cause bad dizzies sometimes when eating sweet stuff,,while other times I can eat anything sweet, except anything with gluten of course. So gluten intolerance can cause lots of issues in many different areas. Including thrush tongue, something Ive had a few years now,, as Ive read the weak thin intestines damaged by gluten allows yeast into the blood stream that may settle different places in the body,,such as in the mouth. So theirs my two cents worth.

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