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Went gluten-free In Support And Found Out You Had It?


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37 replies to this topic

#16 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 19 April 2012 - 07:13 AM

Celiac can cause gallbladder issues which would make digesting fats a problem?
Sounds like my hubby is traveling up DeNile too?

Honestly, my hubby is constantly complaining about various symptoms..and I just don't know what to say anymore?! They all fit with Celiac.


Yes, could be gallbladder.

I don't think we can do a thing until they are ready to try gluten-free or get tested.

I can force our son to get tested, hubs is another story :).
  • 0
Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

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#17 frieze

 
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Posted 20 April 2012 - 11:29 AM

Celiac can cause gallbladder issues which would make digesting fats a problem?
Sounds like my hubby is traveling up DeNile too?

Honestly, my hubby is constantly complaining about various symptoms..and I just don't know what to say anymore?! They all fit with Celiac.

one thing to say is "keep your life insurance policy paid up", another is "please by buy long term care insurance".
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#18 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 20 April 2012 - 11:30 AM

one thing to say is "keep your life insurance policy paid up", another is "please by buy long term care insurance".


Funny, sad, true.
  • 0
Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#19 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 20 April 2012 - 12:35 PM

Hubs went gluten-free about a month after my DX because he felt it was burdensome for me to make two of everything (and thanks so much because I was still dazed from gluten and multiple deficiencies and had trouble with all that) and he said as a scientist and chemist who ran labs, he feels cross contamination is too big of a risk. He just felt it would be easier to take that variable out of the equation. Sounded good to me! ;)

I did not ask him to go gluten-free. He just gave it all up--his beloved Guinness and all! :lol:

I know his allergies and C issues are connected, as I am sure his depressive mother with constant GI problems was a gluten-intolerant if there ever was one :rolleyes: , but he was skeptical. At first.

He is a good sport, makes our bread and take probtioics when I push them.

He feels great! Lots of energy and no falling asleep after dinner and does not take the allergy medication anymore. he is 10 years older than I am but seems 10 years younger.

I said "See, that's because you're gluten-free", and he says "if you say so, babe." I think he remains skeptical that he is sensitive to gluten, but on the few occasions he has experimented outside the house, he gets a tad grouchy and forgetful---totally uncharacteristic of him ---and I tell him loudly--See what I mean!! :lol: . I get the eye rolls, of course. Still a skeptic, I think. But I know what I see.

He does not complain about our gluten-free home ---because he gets gourmet cooking and has no room to complain! But I am the lucky one--because he is 100% supportive.
  • 0

"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#20 AVR1962

 
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Posted 21 April 2012 - 07:04 AM

Both my adult daughters were already gluten-free. One of them convinced me to try and that's when I figured out my own issues with gluten. The one child left at home, and my husband, eat all gluten-free at home but of course eat differntly when out of the house. I wish I could convince them to always be gluten-free as I think they would both feel better.
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Yesterday is not ours to recover but today is ours to win or lose!

Miscarriage, Kidney stones, Anemia, Pneumonia, Migraines, Restless leg, Bone fractures, Blurred/Double vision, Extreme fatigue, Bone & Joint Pain, Thyroid nodule, Celiac diagnosed 2011, Spine and leg bone loss, GERD, Vitamin deficiencies, Malabsorbtion, Neuropathy issues, Ataxia, Raynaud's Syndrome. Currently on diet with limited grain and sugar.

#21 cyberprof

 
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Posted 26 April 2012 - 10:42 PM

Well, the day has finally come for my sweet daughter, who also has been on the long road of DeNile. She was 16 when I was diagnosed and immediately thought she should go gluten-free. Then realized how hard it was and went back on gluten. I know she was a minor but was so afraid of needles that I didn't force her to have a celiac test. Over the years, she has denied any gluten intolerance. Well, this year (she's 21) she was visiting friends on spring break and she got what she thought was food poisoning. Vomitting, Big D both at the same time for hours. Fainted and friends called 911 and sent her to hospital in ambulance. When she told me the story, I asked if the hospital tested for celiac and she said no. The reason I asked was because that is exactly what happened to me that got me to get diagnosed. She said that couldn't be it.

When she got back to college, she went on a health kick, eliminating dairy, processed food, sugar and white carbs. Guess what? She had wheat today and is sick as a dog and is now convinced that she is gluten intolerant. She was pretty sure last week but is convinced now. Wow.

And I've not said "I told you so!" (but I did think it!) She is graduating in June (a full year early!) and moving home until she goes to grad school and she is very excited to cook gluten-free together. Oh, and she is dairy intolerant like her brother too.
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Diagnosed by biopsy 2/12/07. Negative blood tests. Gluten-free (except for accidents) since 2/15/07. DQ2.5 (HLA DQA1*05:DQB1*0201)

Son, age 18, previously delayed growth 3rd percentile weight, 25th percentile height (5'3" at age 15). Negative blood work. Endoscopy declined. Enterolab positive 3/12/08. Gene results: HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201 HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0503 Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,1(Subtype 2,5) Went gluten-free, casein-free 3/15/08. Now 6'2" (Over six feet!) and doing great.

"Great difficulties may be surmounted by patience and perseverance." Abigail Adams (1744-1818) 2nd First Lady of the United States

#22 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 27 April 2012 - 05:34 AM

Well, the day has finally come for my sweet daughter, who also has been on the long road of DeNile. She was 16 when I was diagnosed and immediately thought she should go gluten-free. Then realized how hard it was and went back on gluten. I know she was a minor but was so afraid of needles that I didn't force her to have a celiac test. Over the years, she has denied any gluten intolerance. Well, this year (she's 21) she was visiting friends on spring break and she got what she thought was food poisoning. Vomitting, Big D both at the same time for hours. Fainted and friends called 911 and sent her to hospital in ambulance. When she told me the story, I asked if the hospital tested for celiac and she said no. The reason I asked was because that is exactly what happened to me that got me to get diagnosed. She said that couldn't be it.

When she got back to college, she went on a health kick, eliminating dairy, processed food, sugar and white carbs. Guess what? She had wheat today and is sick as a dog and is now convinced that she is gluten intolerant. She was pretty sure last week but is convinced now. Wow.

And I've not said "I told you so!" (but I did think it!) She is graduating in June (a full year early!) and moving home until she goes to grad school and she is very excited to cook gluten-free together. Oh, and she is dairy intolerant like her brother too.


Well, I'm glad she finally figured it out. I hope it doesn't take a similar experience for my son.

Can you imagine what would have happened if you didn't know your issue, so she still wouldn't know hers? I shudder.
  • 0
Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#23 cait

 
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Posted 26 May 2012 - 09:26 AM

When we realized that the kids were glutening me, we made our house a gluten free zone (last summer). This winter, my son (3) started alternating between C and sudden D, and mentioned his stomach hurting a lot. I thought we should to a gluten-free trial with him, but my partner was unconvinced (he's not mine biologically, so he wouldn't have a genetic predisposition from me). We took him off major sources of dairy, which seemed to help some, but he was still having digestive problems and starting to have accidents at school. I continued to suggest that his behavior and his digestive issues might be helped by gluten-free, but she remained unconvinced and sure I was projecting my issues until recently. He's been off gluten for 2 weeks and has had normal BMs for the first time in a long time. His belly is no longer huge. He's generally happier. I think we're on the right path, though my partner is still somewhat skeptical.

Normal people can go on and off of gluten with no issue, right? She wonders if this is happening because he's been low gluten and has lost the ability to digest it. I maintain that if you remove it and then have a problem returning to it, you were never really digesting it well in the first place. (he also was a reflux baby, and had rashes that we thought were maybe related to wheat as a toddler, so I've long suspected that he had some kind of allergy/intolerance)
  • 0
Dad has Celiac
Neg Celiac tests, positive gene test
Life vastly improved off gluten
Dunno what that makes me, but I'm not going back.
Now corn, soy, and dairy free

#24 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 26 May 2012 - 09:52 AM



Normal people can go on and off of gluten with no issue, right? She wonders if this is happening because he's been low gluten and has lost the ability to digest it. I maintain that if you remove it and then have a problem returning to it, you were never really digesting it well in the first place. (he also was a reflux baby, and had rashes that we thought were maybe related to wheat as a toddler, so I've long suspected that he had some kind of allergy/intolerance)


People without a gluten intolerance should be able to consume gluten once a day, once a week or once a decade and not have a problem with it.

Someone does not "lose the ability to digest it" by going "gluten light or low gluten" unless he had NO ability to tolerate it in the first place.

This is how someone test foods for sensitivities. You take them out for an extended period of time and try it. If you have symptoms, then you know.

Removing an offending food should resolve a food intolerance: it does not "create" one.

She is the not the first one I have heard say such a thing and I have no idea where this idea came from.
  • 0

"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#25 cait

 
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Posted 26 May 2012 - 03:37 PM

Right. That was my understanding as well. I think people come up with a lot of different explanations when they don't want something to be true.
  • 1
Dad has Celiac
Neg Celiac tests, positive gene test
Life vastly improved off gluten
Dunno what that makes me, but I'm not going back.
Now corn, soy, and dairy free

#26 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 26 May 2012 - 04:01 PM

Right. That was my understanding as well. I think people come up with a lot of different explanations when they don't want something to be true.



Yup... we see that a lot on here. Family members who do not want "a gluten" issue to be their problem.

we call it.... floating in the "river of De Nial."
  • 0

"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#27 beebs

 
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Posted 26 May 2012 - 04:12 PM

Yes, my husband is the same - I went gluten free and because two of our kids did too we decided the whole house would. He didn't notice anything unusual at first but then when he went to eat gluten again he got ill. Every time he eats it he gets ill. He can't be bothered to be tested (I want him to though - I'd like to see if he has the genes etc.)
  • 0
HLA DQ8, gluten-free since January 2011

#28 squirmingitch

 
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Posted 26 May 2012 - 04:50 PM

My hubs broke out in obvious dh & he floated in the river of De Nial even though I kept telling him. And he's seen how I've suffered. Of course he had all kinds of excuses. "It's where the back of my legs touch the edge of the chair". "It's because I wash both my hands so much". "It's right where the tongue of my tennis shoes hits". On EACH leg? On EACH hand? On EACH foot? And so on & so forth. I poked & I prodded & I beat my head against a brick wall. I told him all the things that added up in his family & with himself. Still, he held out. Know what finally did it? After about 2 months of these big lesions I asked him why he thought they didn't get infected if they were "something else"? With dh there are so many antibodies in your skin, it would take a whole army of germs to get infected. That's what finally made him see the light. That, and he finally admitted he was tired of feeling like he'd rolled in poison ivy.

Tomorrow marks one month he is gluten-free. Never had withdrawal symptoms. Thank heavens!!!!!!!!!! I don't know if my sanity could have withstood it.
  • 1

Self diagnosed dh Sept. 2011~~~ confirmed dx July 18, 2012
Gluten free Dec. 2011
Soy free Dec. 2011
Hubs self diagnosed dh March 30, 2012
Hubs gluten free March 30, 2012

Summer 2013 We both have added back a little soy which is near unavoidable & we are doing okay with that small amount.

 


#29 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 27 May 2012 - 05:02 AM

That, and he finally admitted he was tired of feeling like he'd rolled in poison ivy.



People have to feel as shi**y as we did to want to try gluten-free living.

People have to be as deathly ill, in pain and pushed to the brink of despair to say "Okay, maybe it IS the gluten."

I prodded a dear friend of mine about this until I feared I would risk our friendship (she is a celiac for sure, IMO but a celiac panel years ago was neg and she went along with that) and when she finally saw the light and went gluten-free and had her son do it as well, a whole host of life-long issues for the both of them began to resolve. The two of us cried like babies at the progress her son has made.

So, unfortunately, we cannot "MAKE" anyone give up gluten, and it is frustrating and sad for me to watch my close and extended family members ignore my DX and their own obvious symptoms and their various AI diseases.(for what? a donut :blink: for pete's sake?) I know they roll their eyes at whatever info I send.

Hubs finally said, "Give it up, babe. Until someone is as bad as you were, (and I have no doubt many of them are headed that way) it's not going to happen." :(
  • 0

"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#30 squirmingitch

 
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Posted 27 May 2012 - 07:15 AM

People have to feel as shi**y as we did to want to try gluten-free living.

People have to be as deathly ill, in pain and pushed to the brink of despair to say "Okay, maybe it IS the gluten."

I prodded a dear friend of mine about this until I feared I would risk our friendship (she is a celiac for sure, IMO but a celiac panel years ago was neg and she went along with that) and when she finally saw the light and went gluten-free and had her son do it as well, a whole host of life-long issues for the both of them began to resolve. The two of us cried like babies at the progress her son has made.

So, unfortunately, we cannot "MAKE" anyone give up gluten, and it is frustrating and sad for me to watch my close and extended family members ignore my DX and their own obvious symptoms and their various AI diseases.(for what? a donut :blink: for pete's sake?) I know they roll their eyes at whatever info I send.

Hubs finally said, "Give it up, babe. Until someone is as bad as you were, (and I have no doubt many of them are headed that way) it's not going to happen." :(


I know. I have a dear friend who IMO could very well be celiac. She has thyroid issues, neuro issues, & was "diagnosed" as having colitis which she takes pills for & they control the problem; also depression (pills). But I know better than to say anything to her about it. I KNOW better. All I can do is wait until more issues crop up & then be there to let her know.
Oh yeah, she also has LOTS of allergy issues with her skin.
  • 0

Self diagnosed dh Sept. 2011~~~ confirmed dx July 18, 2012
Gluten free Dec. 2011
Soy free Dec. 2011
Hubs self diagnosed dh March 30, 2012
Hubs gluten free March 30, 2012

Summer 2013 We both have added back a little soy which is near unavoidable & we are doing okay with that small amount.

 





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