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Help! Is This Safe Or Not?


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20 replies to this topic

#16 dani nero

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 01:18 PM

I missed this reply you made and wanted to clarify the problem with Lindt chocolates. The gluten in Lindt is from barley and in the States, barley is not one of the 8 major allergens that require label warnings...that's where the ingredients listings come into play. This is the learning curve we are talking about and it can seem confusing and daunting at first. Barley is used commonly as a sweetener in candies so you do have to be careful of that.
I had to give up Lindt chocolates and now eat Ghirardelli.

I have heard that Sweden is excellent at labeling but it looks like maybe the barley may not be required along the same lines as here in the States?
It cannot be marked gluten-free if it contains barley but if you are looking at something which is not officially labeled as gluten-free, then you have to scrutinize the label or call the company. I know...it's a real pain at times, especially when I see those barley pops I used to love as a kid. I miss barley but don't miss the wheat!


Sadly the hard way is the only way to learn in these situations :-(
It's not a very excellent system here. I got a reply from the responsible department about this issue and traces of gluten are sadly considered gluten free as long as it doesn't go over 20ppm.. so for a food that is guaranteed to contain as much as or less than 20ppm, the company is not obliged to label the product as gluten-free. I don't like that but the advice I got from everyone on these forums was invaluable and that I like :-) It has helped me immensely! I owe all of you :-)
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Self diagnosed January 2012, and on elimination, low-salicylate & low-iodine diet.
Also G6PD

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#17 Di2011

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 01:22 AM

I can't seem to tolerate any. I wonder what people who aren't super sensitive but consuming lots of 20 ppm products (think about it - breakfast cereal/toast, sandwich at lunch, pasta etc for dinner with lots of possible Gluten-Free snack foods in between). What is it doing to them? There needs to be so much research into ppm measures and diet habit.
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#18 Gemini

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 10:21 AM

It may not be doing anything to them. There is no proof that a labeled gluten-free product contains 20ppm on a routine basis. Most companies worth their salt and committed to providing gluten-free food to the Celiac population strive and test for much lower levels. If they did not, then many more people would not be healing on the gluten-free diet. There would be no point to the gluten-free food industry. Most people who continue to have problems have underlying conditions or multiple intolerance's and that is far more common than the notion that gluten-free food products contain enough gluten to hurt people on a regular basis.

I ate gluten-free bread from day one on the diet because I had to...my weight was dangerously low. I was the poster child for Celiac Disease yet I have healed well over a 7 year period. Healing does take time, as we well know. I am extremely sensitive to trace amounts of gluten yet have no trouble with the small amount of processed gluten-free food I do consume. If it were that contaminated, I would be getting sick when I eat it. I think the fear generated by some over this causes more damage than gluten itself!
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#19 GFinDC

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 07:37 PM

Hi Dani,

It is a good idea to consider all the ingredients in the chocolate as possible problems. If it has soy, which most chocolate does, that could be a problem. If it has milk(dairy) that could be a problem too. Of course it could be the chocolate itself causing a reaction. In that case you could try carob as a substitute.

If you can get 100% chocolate you can make some candy yourself and test the chocolate reaction. Or you could get some soy and test that. Or some milk to try, and then try hard cheese. Not all the same day of course. Spread it out over a few weeks. And trial them for 3 days running. The problem with that approach, is if you are already reacting to some other food in your diet, it can be harder to define the reaction. But the idea is to try foods in their whole state, not mixed in with other ingredients that you haven't already eliminated as problems. If you were going to mix them with other foods, you need to be sure those other foods are not a problem first.
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Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#20 dani nero

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 03:52 PM

Hi Dani,

It is a good idea to consider all the ingredients in the chocolate as possible problems. If it has soy, which most chocolate does, that could be a problem. If it has milk(dairy) that could be a problem too. Of course it could be the chocolate itself causing a reaction. In that case you could try carob as a substitute.

If you can get 100% chocolate you can make some candy yourself and test the chocolate reaction. Or you could get some soy and test that. Or some milk to try, and then try hard cheese. Not all the same day of course. Spread it out over a few weeks. And trial them for 3 days running. The problem with that approach, is if you are already reacting to some other food in your diet, it can be harder to define the reaction. But the idea is to try foods in their whole state, not mixed in with other ingredients that you haven't already eliminated as problems. If you were going to mix them with other foods, you need to be sure those other foods are not a problem first.


Makes sense :-) Yeah I think I was having reactions to other foods and thought I was still being glutened.
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Self diagnosed January 2012, and on elimination, low-salicylate & low-iodine diet.
Also G6PD

#21 BabsV

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 08:56 AM

The 'under 20ppm measurement' is what the EU uses to define 'gluten free' -- it is under the Codex Alimentarius. This is why we have gluten-free wheat starch in the EU -- which makes me ill (I ingested it by mistake when I was a newbie and didn't know better!) This link actually has a good explanation: http://www.coeliache...e.uk/codex.html
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