Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Do gluten-free Flours Really Need To Be Refrigerated?


  • Please log in to reply

22 replies to this topic

#1 Mrs. M.

 
Mrs. M.

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 15 posts
 

Posted 13 March 2012 - 11:27 AM

I just noticed on the labels of all my gluten-free flours and xantham gum that they should be stored in the refrigerator or freezer. Is this necessary if I use up the flour relatively quickly? The bags of flour are all so small that it seems like it will be easy to go through them pretty fast. We have a cool pantry and our house stays pretty cool all year. Our refrigerator and freezer are already full without any flour inside.

thanks!
  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 bbuster

 
bbuster

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 371 posts
 

Posted 13 March 2012 - 12:07 PM

Several cookbooks discuss this, and it's been awhile since I read specifically about the subject, but the only ones I keep in the refrigerator are brown rice and almond flour (and mixes containing them). And I keep potato flour in the freezer since I use so little at a time. I do bake a lot, but I keep the rest of my flours/starches in the pantry: white rice, sticky white rice, tapioca, potato starch, sorghum and also Xanthan gum. The only stuff I ever had a problem with going rancid was soy flour, and I quit using it long ago.
  • 0
Bev

Mom of Garrett - Mizzou freshman; diagnosed Jan 2005

#3 Skylark

 
Skylark

    Glutenologist

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,490 posts
 

Posted 13 March 2012 - 12:42 PM

Whole grain flours with the endosperm like brown rice, millet, or buckwheat have delicate natural oils that will oxidize at room temperature. I handle them the way I used to store whole wheat, sealed well and either refrigerated or frozen. I have had a lot of trouble with brown rice flour in particular going rancid. I keep highly refined starches like corn starch, potato starch, white rice flour, or tapioca in the pantry. I keep xanthan gum in the pantry too.
  • 0

#4 Takala

 
Takala

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,555 posts
 

Posted 13 March 2012 - 12:56 PM

Depends on your climate- if I'm paying all this money for this gluten free stuff, I want to keep it from going buggy or rancid, and in warmer climates that means refrigeration or freezing for stuff not being used quickly, especially if it is the specialty stuff like nuts.

We also, because of our whacked out weather the past year, have had a ferocious attempted invasion of ants in the late summer/fall. Good grief, at least the gluten free stuff is safe in the freezer, I know where the Star Trek writers got their idea for the Borg collective after watching this. :ph34r:
  • 0

#5 love2travel

 
love2travel

    ńĆeznem da se u Hrvatskoj!

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,847 posts
 

Posted 14 March 2012 - 11:02 AM

My 20+ kinds of flours are stored in the freezer (except white rice flour) and my starches are stored in my pantry (i.e. tapioca, corn, arrowroot, potato, etc.). Some of my flours are used less frequently, especially chestnut and sweet potato flours. So, into the freezer they go! I, too, have read countless articles on storage and agree with Skylark that those wholegrain with endosperm should definitely be kept frozen. It makes sense from a food science point of view.
  • 1
<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#6 Fiddle-Faddle

 
Fiddle-Faddle

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,159 posts
 

Posted 16 March 2012 - 05:44 AM

I've never refrigerated my gluten-free flours (which I buy in bulk), and they've been fine.

I do store them in sealed hard plastic food containers (I bought mine at Sam's Club). That keeps creepie-crawlies and humidity out, and they also stack very nicely.
  • 1

#7 bbuster

 
bbuster

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 371 posts
 

Posted 16 March 2012 - 09:49 AM

I do store them in sealed hard plastic food containers

I do that also.
  • 0
Bev

Mom of Garrett - Mizzou freshman; diagnosed Jan 2005

#8 BeFree

 
BeFree

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 174 posts
 

Posted 16 March 2012 - 09:49 AM

I have Bob's Red Mill All Purpose Flour and it doesn't say anywhere on the package to refrigerate it. I have kept in the cupboard. Should I refrigerate it?
  • 0
Gluten-Free as of September 2011

Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits...it says 'Oooooooo'.
Peter, those are Cheerios.

#9 RiceGuy

 
RiceGuy

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,520 posts
 

Posted 16 March 2012 - 10:41 AM

I generally freeze flours which won't be used up within a short period of time, like about a month or two at most. Especially those with a high protein content, such as bean flours, teff, amaranth, etc. Soy also has a high protein content, though I generally don't buy that one. The gums I keep at room temp.

Same with whole grains - they will spoil at room temp much faster than refined starches.
  • 0
A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

#10 come dance with me

 
come dance with me

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 401 posts
 

Posted 16 March 2012 - 07:36 PM

I keep it in Tupperware containers in the pantry, but it never lasts more than a week or 2 here anyway.
  • 0
Lord please give me patience, because if you give me strength, I may just beat the living crap out of someone...

#11 BeFree

 
BeFree

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 174 posts
 

Posted 23 March 2012 - 04:02 PM

Can anyone please tell me, how would I know if my flour is spoiled from being unrefrigerated? I want to use it to make banana bread tomorrow. How would I know if it's OK? And would it actually be harmful if it's spoiled, or would it just taste bad?

My flour is Bob's Red Mill All Purpose Flour which has been in my cupboard for a good month or so. The bag has been opened, but clipped tightly at the top. It is made from garbanzo bean flour, potato starch, tapioca flour, white sorghum flour, and fava bean flour.
  • 0
Gluten-Free as of September 2011

Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits...it says 'Oooooooo'.
Peter, those are Cheerios.

#12 pricklypear1971

 
pricklypear1971

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,684 posts
 

Posted 23 March 2012 - 11:39 PM

Can anyone please tell me, how would I know if my flour is spoiled from being unrefrigerated? I want to use it to make banana bread tomorrow. How would I know if it's OK? And would it actually be harmful if it's spoiled, or would it just taste bad?

My flour is Bob's Red Mill All Purpose Flour which has been in my cupboard for a good month or so. The bag has been opened, but clipped tightly at the top. It is made from garbanzo bean flour, potato starch, tapioca flour, white sorghum flour, and fava bean flour.



Well, I haven't tested gluten-free flours like this...but for wheat flours I'd just taste a bit of raw flour - if it tastes bad (sour, bitter) it's rancid.

I honestly have NO idea what all the gluten-free flours should taste like - I'd use the same guideline. To me, most rice blends taste like "nothing", so I'd be suspicious a mix had a strong taste. Bean and pea flours are supposed to have a stronger flavor, so I have no idea there.

Just an FYI let your flours come to room temp before using them. It does make a difference in the result.
  • 0
Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#13 sa1937

 
sa1937

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,657 posts
 

Posted 24 March 2012 - 05:38 AM

BeFree, what does the flour smell like? I think you could detect if it had a rancid smell.
  • 1
Sylvia
Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009
Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010
Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

#14 RiceGuy

 
RiceGuy

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,520 posts
 

Posted 24 March 2012 - 06:01 AM

Can anyone please tell me, how would I know if my flour is spoiled from being unrefrigerated? I want to use it to make banana bread tomorrow. How would I know if it's OK? And would it actually be harmful if it's spoiled, or would it just taste bad?

My flour is Bob's Red Mill All Purpose Flour which has been in my cupboard for a good month or so. The bag has been opened, but clipped tightly at the top. It is made from garbanzo bean flour, potato starch, tapioca flour, white sorghum flour, and fava bean flour.

Although I've never had a bean flour from Bob's Red Mill that wasn't rancid even when the freshness date couldn't be any farther out, one month shouldn't be too bad. There could be some degradation if the flour had been sitting in the store a long time before you purchased it however. Since bean flours don't generally taste so nice when raw, and neither do they typically smell so great, those indicators may not be of value. Especially if you're unfamiliar with the flours in question. Since some of the mix is starch, that should help extend the shelf life somewhat.

Best I can say, is consider the date on the package. Under ideal conditions, I'd personally be comfortable using the flour for between 2-3 months at room temp. So as long as the bag wasn't exposed to light or elevated temperatures for prolonged time periods, and it was properly closed with as little air as possible, I think it should still be ok.
  • 0
A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

#15 RiceGuy

 
RiceGuy

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,520 posts
 

Posted 24 March 2012 - 06:51 AM

Just an FYI let your flours come to room temp before using them. It does make a difference in the result.

Thanks for reminding me!

It is important to allow packages/containers of flour to reach room temp before opening them. This is because cold flour will cause moisture from the air to condense on it, as well as on the inside of the container. Just like a cold drink gets water condensation on the glass. The moisture will of course accelerate spoilage tremendously.
  • 1
A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: