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Do gluten-free Flours Really Need To Be Refrigerated?


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22 replies to this topic

#16 BeFree

 
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Posted 25 March 2012 - 06:10 AM

Thank you, this makes sense. My conclusion from all of your input is that like most other foods, it should not have some sort of extremely offensive odor or taste if it's still fresh. When I taste the raw flour it does not taste *great* obviously, since it's raw flour, but it doesn't taste what I would guess to be sour, and it has no strong smell.

Does anyone know though, if I accidentally eat something with spoiled flour, will that hurt me or just taste bad?
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#17 Skylark

 
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Posted 25 March 2012 - 08:41 AM

Oxidized fatty acids aren't terribly healthy to eat (which is why you perceive them as rancid) but usually the flour will have an "off" taste/smell when it starts to spoil.
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#18 freeatlast

 
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Posted 16 February 2013 - 05:35 PM

Can we still post on this? Apparently so.

I made lovely chocolate cupcakes for Valentine's Day, but hadn't baked much since last summer. Something went bad, but I'm not sure what. At first I thought it was the potato starch, then wondered if it was the tapioca. Could it have been the xanthan gum. Oh, dear. Have been keeping them all in the pantry after reading this thread--previously in the refrigerator.

Should I just throw them all away? I also keep my white rice flour in the pantry, but used a new bag, so it probably wasn't that.

Missed a day of work over this, so I may just throw out all of the above. Also, gave some to my next door neighbor who had just had surgery and she was up all night with the big D (she's not a gluten-freerer, but loves my cooking or LOVED, before this).
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Proofreader, copy editor, herb gardener and an evolving gluten-free cook.

Had a reaction to wheat, oats, rye, and barley in a lab test done by a homeopathic doctor in 1997. Have been mostly gluten-free since then. Also highly allergic to MSG.

Here's a quote I ran across when researching self-advocacy for children with special needs that I like: "Our subconscious picks up on each positive action we take on our own behalf, lifting the spirit and deepening our self-respect." Kat James

#19 psawyer

 
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Posted 16 February 2013 - 06:12 PM

While they may keep better refrigerated, we store them in air-tight containers at room temperature. Be sure that they are truly air-tight. Tupperware and Oxo Good Grip are--Glad and Ziploc are not 100%.
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#20 kareng

 
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Posted 16 February 2013 - 06:14 PM

While they may keep better refrigerated, we store them in air-tight containers at room temperature. Be sure that they are truly air-tight. Tupperware and Oxo Good Grip are--Glad and Ziploc are not 100%.


I just spent the kids inheritance at Bed, Bath & Beyond to get some of those Oxo things for my flours. I do keep the almond in the freezer. I think that can go bad easier, but I don't have any evidence.
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#21 freeatlast

 
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Posted 17 February 2013 - 04:36 AM

Since I don't know where to get Tupperware, OXO it is! I was just folding the tops over three or four times tightly (I thought) and securing them with a clip.
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Proofreader, copy editor, herb gardener and an evolving gluten-free cook.

Had a reaction to wheat, oats, rye, and barley in a lab test done by a homeopathic doctor in 1997. Have been mostly gluten-free since then. Also highly allergic to MSG.

Here's a quote I ran across when researching self-advocacy for children with special needs that I like: "Our subconscious picks up on each positive action we take on our own behalf, lifting the spirit and deepening our self-respect." Kat James

#22 RyanIN

 
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Posted 17 February 2013 - 05:54 AM

I've never put any of my flours in the fridge, but then again I've always ignored that my peanut butter jar says to put it in the fridge too. Though, I agree that soy flour is just not worth having since it does seem to go rancid quickly (and then subsequently ruins what ever you accidentally put it in). But, unless you are planning to take several months to use a certain flour, I wouldn't worry to much. But since most gluten-free flours comes in such small quanities, it usually isn't a problem. That was one of the hardest things to adjust to about going gluten free. I was used to paying $15 for a 50 pound bag of whole wheat flour. And now it cost $10 for a less than 2 pound bag of Quinoa flour.
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#23 freeatlast

 
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Posted 21 February 2013 - 03:09 AM

The real answer here, for me, is I'm going back to putting Tapioca, potato starch, and xanthan gum back in the refrigerator where they never went bad, for me at least.


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Proofreader, copy editor, herb gardener and an evolving gluten-free cook.

Had a reaction to wheat, oats, rye, and barley in a lab test done by a homeopathic doctor in 1997. Have been mostly gluten-free since then. Also highly allergic to MSG.

Here's a quote I ran across when researching self-advocacy for children with special needs that I like: "Our subconscious picks up on each positive action we take on our own behalf, lifting the spirit and deepening our self-respect." Kat James




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