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Foods With Hydrolyzed Proteins
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For those who are careful to only eat tested gluten free products but have had issues with tested gluten free products that contain hydrolyzed gluten, this might provide some possible answers why.

http://www.beveragedaily.com/Regulation-Safety/CODEX-sanctioned-gluten-testing-method-may-underestimate-values-in-hydrolysed-foods-such-as-beer-researcher-claims

Essentially, it mentioned that in foods and beverages with hydrolyzed gluten proteins, the sandwich ELIZA test, which is usually used, may be underestimating the gluten levels. This is based on the discovered difference in accuracy between the sandwich ELIZA and a newer developed ELIZA test when it comes to detecting gluten.

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For those who are careful to only eat tested gluten free products but have had issues with tested gluten free products that contain hydrolyzed gluten, this might provide some possible answers why.

http://www.beveragedaily.com/Regulation-Safety/CODEX-sanctioned-gluten-testing-method-may-underestimate-values-in-hydrolysed-foods-such-as-beer-researcher-claims

Essentially, it mentioned that in foods and beverages with hydrolyzed gluten proteins, the sandwich ELIZA test, which is usually used, may be underestimating the gluten levels. This is based on the discovered difference in accuracy between the sandwich ELIZA and a newer developed ELIZA test when it comes to detecting gluten.

That sure could explain why so many of us react to products that should be considered "safe"? I hope they switch to the newer more accurate method of testing. Sometimes companies opt for the test that means

they are in compliance, and don't need to change anything rather than public safety? :o

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It doesn't really explain reactions. None of us eats foods with hydrolyzed gluten like soy sauce or beer. Most hydrolyzed vegetable protein in the US not wheat, and if it's wheat it's declared as such on the label because allergic people still react. This test may pick up traces of gluten in distilled foods like whiskey and vinegar but I'd be surprised if it's enough for many people to react to.

It's not going to affect brands like Udi's, Bob's Red Mill, Glutino, Amy's, etc. In foods that aren't hydrolyzed it says the sandwich R5 is fine.

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Hydrolyzed Gluten Protein could be corn as well and processors must, by law, identify the source of the gluten protein on labeling.

(not speaking to the point that T.H. was making, but I think it adds to the topic of concern) ;)

Of interest possibly:

http://www.cghjournal.org/article/S1542-3565%2810%2900987-0/abstract

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It doesn't really explain reactions. None of us eats foods with hydrolyzed gluten like soy sauce or beer. Most hydrolyzed vegetable protein in the US not wheat, and if it's wheat it's declared as such on the label because allergic people still react.

Oh goodness, no, I didn't mean to imply that it would explain most of our reactions. Sorry 'bout that. Just mentioning it for those of us who are still able to eat some processed gluten-free foods, especially in Europe where hydrolyzed wheat is allowed as an ingredient in gluten-free foods.

I know that some people here pay attention to the ppm of gluten that foods test for, so if they were safe with, say, <10 ppm foods but kept reacting to foods with hydrolyzed wheat that were supposed to be <10 ppm, this might provide a possible explanation.

Hydrolyzed Gluten Protein could be corn as well and processors must, by law, identify the source of the gluten protein on labeling.

Of interest possibly:

http://www.cghjournal.org/article/S1542-3565%2810%2900987-0/abstract

Re: the gluten protein - good point. I didn't even think of that for those of us in the USA. I was thinking more of Europe and forgetting that hydrolyzed gluten from other grains can be found as an ingredient here.

Re: the study - From the research I've been doing, there's one limitation to the study that would seem to be a problem for super-sensitive folks, and even possibly less sensitive celiacs. When the study was done, the participants in the study had to be healthy and on a gluten-free diet for at least 5 years before participating. But unless I'm completely mistaken, at the time the study was done and when these folks were staying healthy on their gluten-free diets, the ppm standard for gluten free food in that area was 200 ppm.

So looking at it, it seems like the conclusions of the study should be more that people who can safely, regularly eat foods that are <200 ppm do well with hydrolyzed wheat gluten.

I've been trying to see if any studies have been done with hydrolyzed protein and Celiacs who regularly eat a <20 ppm diet, but I haven't found any yet. Just more research where the gluten free standard was significantly higher than 20 ppm.

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That makes sense. I wonder about the sourdough study. You might glance at that one. I think they were testing with R5 elisa.

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Are fermented foods considered hydrolyzed? Soy sauce is fermented and considered hydrolyzed. Does that mean that this study would apply to vinegar and grain alcohol?

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I've got the study in another window. They include beer, baby food and syrup as hydrolyzed. Then they talk about beer, pasta, breadcrumbs and cake. I'm not sure if they mean gluten-free or not, but they found 68 - 218 ppm, so that couldn't be regular gluten baked goods, right? Anyone have access to the full paper and want to tell us? If you click on the link in the first post and then click on the link on the bottom you come to it.

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Preparation of self-made maize breads spiked with gliadins.

Firstly, we tested all the ingredients using the sandwich R5 ELISA

to ensure that they were gluten free. For preparation of the selfmade

breads A

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2.2.2.3. Food samples spiked with gliadins. We spiked 21 selected

food samples with 55 ppm of gliadins. To obtain a homogenous

powder and to check for a possible matrix effect that could interfere

with the analysis, the gliadins were weighed and added to the

food sample and the mixture was ground with an IKA A11 analytical

mill (IKA

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These data suggest that the R5 antibody cross-reacts with certain

soy proteins that remain in suspension in ethanol extracts

but precipitate when sample is preincubated with UPEX solution.

Consequently, we assumed that processing soybeans to produce

soy drinks might cause changes in the solubility of these proteins

leading them to remain in suspension in 60% ethanol but nor in

UPEX/60% ethanol. These results demonstrate that R5 ELISA combined

with extraction with the UPEX solution is a reliable way to

analyse gluten in soy foods

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Are fermented foods considered hydrolyzed? Soy sauce is fermented and considered hydrolyzed. Does that mean that this study would apply to vinegar and grain alcohol?

Yes, it would.

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I read the OP as pertaining more to Europe's allowance of "de-glutened" wheat products & finding that they're maybe not as de-glutened as they thought.

Every Euro study is tainted in my mind when their gluten-free group is stuffing themselves w/ these products.

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I've never seen any products with codex wheat, and wouldn't touch it if I did find any. I don't think UK celiacs are "stuffing themselves" with this rubbish. I can't speak for the rest of Europe though.

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I have to avoid an 'hydro' etc etc gluten originated sources of ingredients. I gave up researching the science etc when my experimenting led me to find any of these gluten-containing-origin ingredients didn't help my DH. It took many many months of experimenting and may just be me or my DH that reacts. Today I know that anything with all the 'gluten-free' but potentially gluten origin ingredients just simply don't help my skin condition.

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I've never seen any products with codex wheat, and wouldn't touch it if I did find any. I don't think UK celiacs are "stuffing themselves" with this rubbish. I can't speak for the rest of Europe though.

Sorry I was a bit hyperbolic.

You really don't see products in the UK w/ de-glutened wheat starch?

I've been under the impression they're quite common in Europe.

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Sorry I was a bit hyperbolic.

You really don't see products in the UK w/ de-glutened wheat starch?

I've been under the impression they're quite common in Europe.

Hi Tom

Yes, I always read labels, mostly reading them and putting them back on the shelves because I don't dare buy the products, as I find eating one item is ok, but eating half a dozen is not, and if I have a packet of a "gluten-free" treat in the house and find the first one ok, I find the rest hard to resist!

Most of our supermarket foods in the "free from" ranges are free from wheat, gluten and dairy. I guess the codex wheat products must be out there somewhere, but I never seem to pick them up. The UK celiac society officially approves it as gluten (but, obviously, not wheat) free. I suspect I have an allergy reaction to wheat so I take care to avoid it. I think I am probably more obsessive about this than the average UK celiac, but they can't be eating very much codex wheat if it is not commonly seen on the supermarket shelves.

However, I do understand what you mean. I am starting to think that, perhaps in the interests of making sure study cohorts are sufficiently large, researchers are sometimes glossing over sigificant differences in circumstances of their subjects, and thereby rendering their studies overly generic.

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