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Tocopherol Acetate Confusion
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How important is it to avoid this in cosmetics and how do I know if a product I have containing this is gluten free?

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More spedically I am wondering if neutrogena oil free acne stress control face wash is gluten free. The only tricky ingredient I can see is tocopherol acetate. Their offices aren't open on the weekends for me to call.

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I would not worry about it. Most current lists of safe food ingredients do not list tocopherols as a concern, so I can't imagine why they would be an issue in cosmetics.

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I would not worry about it. Most current lists of safe food ingredients do not list tocopherols as a concern, so I can't imagine why they would be an issue in cosmetics.

I have found quite a few articles online and even on this forum about tocopherol acetate being either synthetically or naturally derived. From what I've read if its naturally derived it can come from wheat, corn or soy. I just don't know if there's a way to tell which my new product comes from. It is not listed d- or di- before so I guess I have to call the company. I should have posted this is in a different section because I think what I'm really looking for is anyone with experience using this actual Neutrogena product since I cannot get ahold of the company until Monday.

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Yes, tocopherol can be naturally derived from a number of sources, including wheat. But the amount of protein contamination in the result is so low as to be below detectable limits. This material is then used as a minor ingredient in a product. The science tells me not to worry.

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That is good to hear! When I read that I needed to be concerned about that ingredient as well it felt frustrating to me because it is in a LOT of cosmetics. I have gotten glutened from very small amounts in the past so I am always overly-cautious.

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The new gluten free rice krispies have alpha tocopherol acetate as a ingredients. Does anybdy know if that is safe? I had 2 bowls and got severe stomach cramps/pain and DH has broken out all over my hands again. That's is only ingredient I see that may cause problems. Has anybody else had problems with the new rice krispies?

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I eat the gluten free rice krispies quite often with no issues and I am sensitive to very small amounts of gluten. I also have dh. I wonder if there's another food allergy on there or something else you're missing?

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I eat gluten-free Rice Krispies regularly, along with Rice Chex. No problems.

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Ok. Thank you both for the help and input

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The new gluten free rice krispies have alpha tocopherol acetate as a ingredients. Does anybdy know if that is safe? I had 2 bowls and got severe stomach cramps/pain and DH has broken out all over my hands again. That's is only ingredient I see that may cause problems. Has anybody else had problems with the new rice krispies?

I eat the gluten-free Rice Krispies often and have no problems whatsoever.

FWIW, I am a low-trace-gluten reactor :lol: so I would have an issue right away.

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More spedically I am wondering if neutrogena oil free acne stress control face wash is gluten free. The only tricky ingredient I can see is tocopherol acetate. Their offices aren't open on the weekends for me to call.

Honestly, the only "cosmetics" worry I would have (personally )is if a LIPSTICK contains wheat germ oil.

That should be listed.

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Honestly, the only "cosmetics" worry I would have (personally )is if a LIPSTICK contains wheat germ oil.

That should be listed.

I've also seen hydrolyzed wheat protein in shampoo. I don't know if it's a worry since shampoo washes off but it's easy enough to find a shampoo without gluten deliberately added as a selling point. :lol:

I don't worry about tocopherol either.

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I've also seen hydrolyzed wheat protein in shampoo. I don't know if it's a worry since shampoo washes off but it's easy enough to find a shampoo without gluten deliberately added as a selling point. :lol:

I don't worry about tocopherol either.

true, true :)

I should add that I also avoid wheat protein in shampoo.

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I react to any type of wheat or oats in shampoo, conditioner, makeup, body soap. I had a full blown reaction from mascara with hydrolyzed wheat protein. Definitely steer clear of gluten in your beauty products!

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Some of us with DH have a problem with sals (salicylates) http://salicylatesensitivity.com/

btw I also don't tolerate any of the commercial products like soap, shampoo etc. I am slowly (as finances allow) converting to no gluten and ((even harder)) low sals personal products. It is a very tough road but seems to make a difference.

My circumstances are extreme so I hope you don't need to go down this road.

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Honestly, the only "cosmetics" worry I would have (personally )is if a LIPSTICK contains wheat germ oil.

That should be listed.

Actually, it's NOT usually listed as "wheat germ oil" (except with more conscientious companies like Burt's Bees). "Alpha tocopheryl" often is wheat germ oil, but is not spelled out as such... presumably because the manufacturer is thereby free to use whatever the cheapest, most available source of alpha tocpheryl is at a given moment (wheat, corn, etc..), according to market fluctuations.

For months I was getting serious acne (and i'm past the age of acne) when using moisturizer with A.tocopheryl. I found a moisturizer without it (not easy to find), and the acne cleared up immediately. This isn't definitive proof of having been face-glutened, but it's enough to make me wary.

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If I wasn't sure, I would test a little on my skin and watch for a reaction.

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Actually, it's NOT usually listed as "wheat germ oil" (except with more conscientious companies like Burt's Bees). "Alpha tocopheryl" often is wheat germ oil, but is not spelled out as such... presumably because the manufacturer is thereby free to use whatever the cheapest, most available source of alpha tocpheryl is at a given moment (wheat, corn, etc..), according to market fluctuations.

For months I was getting serious acne (and i'm past the age of acne) when using moisturizer with A.tocopheryl. I found a moisturizer without it (not easy to find), and the acne cleared up immediately. This isn't definitive proof of having been face-glutened, but it's enough to make me wary.

http://www.glutenfreedietitian.com/newsletter/vitamin-e-from-wheat-germ-oil/

 

This ought to clear up any concerns about safety for Celiacs.  You most likely have a topical allergy to one of the ingredients, which is very common.

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Actually, it's NOT usually listed as "wheat germ oil" (except with more conscientious companies like Burt's Bees). "Alpha tocopheryl" often is wheat germ oil, but is not spelled out as such... presumably because the manufacturer is thereby free to use whatever the cheapest, most available source of alpha tocpheryl is at a given moment (wheat, corn, etc..), according to market fluctuations.

I missed this when it was posted two weeks ago. It is just wrong. Thanks, Gemini, for waking it up.

Alpha-tocopherol can be derived from wheat germ oil, but it is not the same thing. Starch (the single word in an ingredient list) is corn starch. But you can't put whole kernel corn into something and call it "starch." If you see alpha-tocopherol or tocopherol acetate it refers to a highly refined extract from vegetable oil (probably soybean oil), but not the actual oil itself.

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