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Autism Rising


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42 replies to this topic

#31 beebs

 
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Posted 08 April 2012 - 05:47 PM

Oh sure, I get you, my son (when suffering severe malabsorption) was diagnosed with toddler diarrhea. He then became severely aneamic to the point where he couldn't breathe properly, couldn't stand up or play and developed a heart murmur. All the while I was telling the Paed about our family history of coelaic, she did the blood tests which were negative and then tried to tell me that was the gold standard in testing. :rolleyes: Boy, don't they absolutely despise when a lowly citizen knows more about something medical than they do!
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#32 sora

 
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Posted 09 April 2012 - 03:17 AM

Found this article this morning. How significant is it when there were only a thousand or so in the study?

http://www.ottawacit...8724/story.html

This is an article from Jan. 2012.

http://www.ottawacit...3448/story.html
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Ah, but I was so much older then, Im younger than that now.


#33 Ninja

 
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Posted 09 April 2012 - 04:29 AM

Yes they do!! I am so sorry about your son, I assume he is doing better now?
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#34 Bubba's Mom

 
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Posted 09 April 2012 - 05:54 AM

Found this article this morning. How significant is it when there were only a thousand or so in the study?

http://www.ottawacit...8724/story.html

This is an article from Jan. 2012.

http://www.ottawacit...3448/story.html

I found the article that said a Mother's blood sugar could affect the baby's brain especially interesting. I wouldn't have guessed that connection.
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#35 krystynycole

 
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Posted 09 April 2012 - 06:51 AM

I think there may be a country to country thing here, you can't just diagnose autism here, you have go to a number of different specialists here, its actually quite a long and tedious process. But still - at the end of the day, special Ed teacher is not the same as a specialist, and if going though this process has taught me anything then yes - ASD is on a scale, no to people are alike, they all have strengths and weaknesses just like anyone else. It can be mild or severe and every shade in between. And with early intervention - a child who was diagnosed with quite bad ASD, given the right services can be almost completely normal when they are older. So that whole Scoffing over kids with ASD etc, just proves to me that lucky -doesn't know anything at all about ASD.

Having said that - there are of course misdiagnoses, just as there are with everything in life. Are you guys honestly saying that you expect 100% diagnosis rate? Because science just isn't there yet.


From my experience when I walked through the process with my sister last summer in the USA, we only went to one neurologist and got the diagnosis. However, I think that because there are so many different specialists who can diagnosis, there is no way they can all share the same views and be kept up to date on the changes and new information. I have various students who have a diagnosis and they all have their diagnosis from different types of doctors: psychiatrist, psychologist, or neurologist. If doctors GI docs can't get celiac right, how can all these different doctors keep ASD straight?!

Just my opinion...
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#36 Lisa

 
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Posted 09 April 2012 - 01:00 PM

A couple current links:

http://sfari.org/new...m-sparks-debate

http://www.disabilit...m-autism/15266/
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#37 beebs

 
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Posted 09 April 2012 - 02:54 PM

Found this article this morning. How significant is it when there were only a thousand or so in the study?

http://www.ottawacit...8724/story.html

This is an article from Jan. 2012.

http://www.ottawacit...3448/story.html



Hmm, I know a few people with Autistic children (as you do when you start going through the process) and all the mothers are normal or below average weight wise. I was very thin when pregnant as was my SIL. I did read somewhere that twins have a 30 times higher rate of Autism than singletons - which is interesting.
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#38 krystynycole

 
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Posted 09 April 2012 - 03:29 PM

Hmm, I know a few people with Autistic children (as you do when you start going through the process) and all the mothers are normal or below average weight wise. I was very thin when pregnant as was my SIL. I did read somewhere that twins have a 30 times higher rate of Autism than singletons - which is interesting.




I thought the same thing. My sister is very thin!
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#39 beachbirdie

 
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Posted 13 April 2012 - 09:44 AM

My husband and I just watched a phenomenal movie yesterday called "Temple Grandin" about the life of an autistic woman who went on to do amazing things in her life, and even those without one. I highly recommend this inspiring film! It will encourage anyone with an autistic person in their life!

Temple was born in 1947, a time when autism was still blamed on a "cold, distant, un-affectionate mother". She holds a Ph.D now, and teaches in the animal science department at Colorado State University, has written many books on the experience of autism from the "inside" as well as helping those who live with autistic people. Temple also presents at autism seminars.


Here's the Wiki about her, here is her own website.

There are several videos on YouTube of her speaking on autism, all good viewing.

I know there is still much uncertainty about causes, but it is so heartening to know that many people on the autism spectrum can thrive, function, and contribute great things to the world. I speak as one who has a sibling with Asperger's. His life has been so hard because of the difficulties that go with AS; he is over 60 now, born before the "spectrum" was understood as it is now {sigh}.
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#40 Kelleybean

 
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Posted 13 April 2012 - 04:26 PM

Couple random thoughts ...

I absolutely believe that autism is on the rise, and that it's not just a case of "misdiagnosis." My son is autistic - he was diagnosed at 18 months. We suspected at 15 months. He had SO many of the characteristics that we just "knew". But when we talked to our pediatrician about our concerns, he completely blew us off. Told us boys talk later, let's wait and see, etc. etc. etc. I'm so glad that we didn't listen to him. I have talked to other parents and my experience was not at all uncommon - for every child that is diagnosed, there are so many who are autistic but are undiagnosed.

We also had to go through a long process to get a diagnosis. We filled out extensive questionnaires on his behavior at home and saw a developmental pediatrician who spent several hours talking to us and observing Will before giving us a diagnosis. I'm sure there are some kids out there who are getting cursory examinations and coming out with a diagnosis of autism, but that was not our experience at all.

I think my last point is that to me it almost doesn't matter. 1 in 88, 1 out of 100 ... the point is that there are a lot of people out there with autism and we as a society haven't figured out how to handle it. We were fortunate to be able to get intensive early intervention and I'm not exaggerating when I say that it gave me my son. Prior to therapy, he had no words not even mama. Literally just walked around the house carrying the dog leashes and spinning their food bowls over and over. Very rarely interacted with us or even looked at us, never smiled. Now at age 4 he would be considered "high functioning". His language is catching up to age level, he interacts with us all the time and is starting to play with peers. He's the happiest kid I know. Even though he has a lot of issues, particularly socially, he has come so far it's incredible. But we had to spend our retirement, fight with insurance (many insurance companies don't even cover autism, which is beyond my understanding how they can deny paying for a neurological condition), and borrow from family to make it happen. We put off me going back to work so that I can take charge of his treatment. But not everyone can do that. I really wish that there would be an equal focus on how we can get these kids the help they need b/c it really does make a huge difference in the long run.

Ok stepping off my soapbox now!
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#41 Songbird1976

 
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Posted 13 April 2012 - 07:47 PM

Sometimes I wonder if some of these 'diagnosis' that they are labeling children with are really disabilities at all. There is no doubt that those with the most serious forms of autism need to be given all the help possible to achieve a more normal and productive life. But autism has many spectrums and some of the more mild forms, like Aspergers, produce adults that are very productive and very intelligent and high achievers. They may lack a bit in social areas, have a bit more difficulty making friends and would have worn the label of shy nerd in past years. People have differences and that isn't always something that needs a label or intervention. I have to wonder how many of our past scientists and inventor etc. would have been labeled in the past. And the impact those labels and interventions would have had on their discoveries.


As a parent of two daughters on the "Austim Spectrum" I will say this: I agree that some forms of the spectrum disorders are misdiagnosed as with any disorder. I also agree any serious forms should be given their full attention as required. I must say that it truly is impossible to understand something unless you have walked it and I learn that with every day I live. That said, my daughters, whom you would not know had full blown childhood Autism resembled the behavior of Helen Keller at best when they were young. You might give them a diagnosis of high functioning "Asperger's" today, given that we dedicated every waking moment and resource to their education and therapies. So diagnoses can be quite relative and subjective. They are very important for obtaining services for children and people with these very real disabilities. Just as they are for us with Celiac's in understanding and becoming healthy and whole again. I guess what I'm trying to say is it took a world to get these two girls to where they are now, people give up their lives, unseen, unheard, not just a diagnosis or not. I hope you don't mind my sharing... thanks :)
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#42 beachbirdie

 
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Posted 13 April 2012 - 07:49 PM

...I really wish that there would be an equal focus on how we can get these kids the help they need b/c it really does make a huge difference in the long run.


Beautifully said, Kelleybean. It seems almost criminal to hold back what these kids need when they can do so much with the right environment and the right kind of help. That sticks with me from the movie I mentioned, and it is the name of a book..."Different, not less".

I am so glad you were able to do what you did for your son and that he is doing so well!
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2012 - TtG IgG positive... I am now, finally, Gluten Free - 5/16/2012

#43 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 14 April 2012 - 04:40 AM

As a parent of two daughters on the "Austim Spectrum" I will say this: I agree that some forms of the spectrum disorders are misdiagnosed as with any disorder. I also agree any serious forms should be given their full attention as required. I must say that it truly is impossible to understand something unless you have walked it and I learn that with every day I live. That said, my daughters, whom you would not know had full blown childhood Autism resembled the behavior of Helen Keller at best when they were young. You might give them a diagnosis of high functioning "Asperger's" today, given that we dedicated every waking moment and resource to their education and therapies. So diagnoses can be quite relative and subjective. They are very important for obtaining services for children and people with these very real disabilities. Just as they are for us with Celiac's in understanding and becoming healthy and whole again. I guess what I'm trying to say is it took a world to get these two girls to where they are now, people give up their lives, unseen, unheard, not just a diagnosis or not. I hope you don't mind my sharing... thanks :)



I am glad your children were able to get the help they needed and are now doing much better. I have walked in your shoes and still do so daily. I have never said that folks who are having difficulties should not get help or treatment. But I do not think it should be a diagnosis given by one doctor who only sees the kids a couple times in the instances of children who are not severely impacted. All avenues should be explored before a diagnosis is given but that doesn't mean that treatment and therapies to make life easier shouldn't be done if the person is having problems that are interfering with their lives and learning.
Just looking at the high numbers of us celiacs who were labeled as depressed, hypochondriacs and IBS sufferers and then the doctors stopped looking for the real cause of our issues. It would be a shame if some of the children now being labeled as Aspies in reality had other issues going on but don't recieve help for them because their ped diagnoses Autism without checking to see if other things are actually impacting their function.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)




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