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Really A Pharmacist?


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43 replies to this topic

#16 Takala

 
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Posted 07 April 2012 - 05:28 AM


The pharmacist shrugged her shoulders, looked at the ingredients for all of about 3 seconds and said "Looks ok to me"! Um...not good enough. I told her I needed to call the manufacturer but they wouldn't let me remove it from the counter in order to do it. They said I had to buy it (and register my drivers license number in order to do so because of the meth dealers), call the manufacturer myself and then return it if need be.



What a great scam. Pharmacist unwilling to check for allergen in prescribed medication and forcing a sale. She could have laid the box label down on a copy machine, she could have given you a phone number to call with the code on the box.... she could have done her JOB and checked, herself.... Unfortunately you went along with it.... You really need to contact your state's Attorney General office and file a complaint against this store.

AND WHAT IS GLUTEN DOING IN A CHILD'S ALLERGY MEDICATION, or for that matter, ANY OTC ANTIHISTAMINE ?

I went thru really extensive research two years ago attempting to find out just what the h*ll was in different kinds of otc Benedryl, because the packaging changed, the kind I used to take (adequately labeled, and safe) was no longer available, and all the website research I was pulling up would not give the ingredients for all the different permutations now available... the liquid this, the gelcap that, all in pretty colors.... horrible marketing. Foreign manufacture, imported. This is extremely dangerous.
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#17 Skylark

 
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Posted 07 April 2012 - 07:51 AM

wow that must be a lot of gluten, since the pills are so tiny and wheat starch now is around 20ppm or less.
(the gluten-free goods manufacturers got the suppliers to understand that ALL gluten-free flour now needs to be purer, so they changed the process and started to make purer wheat starch)
(they use wheat starch based gluten-free foods here that test below 20 ppm)
(even that is too much for me)

The only pills I have seen with wheat starch, is a calcium carbonate over the counter tablet intended to relieve too much stomach acid, and caugh syrup often has glucose syrup that is made from wheat, and several kids got sick

My doctor also had a gluten-sensitive patient who reacted to pills so the US pills must not be so clean. He was a little surprised, but open-minded enough to start telling me and his other celiac/gluten intolerant patients to check meds and switch to naturally gluten-free foods with no eating out if they are feeling ill.
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#18 JustNana

 
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Posted 07 April 2012 - 08:07 AM

I found an OTC calcium, magnesium, zinc supplement in the back of my cabinet and it was several years past the shelf date. Have read hundreds of supplement labels and no gluten. There are also many highly sensitive people on this forum and don't seem to have problems with contamination.

My Dr did say he heard that Amour Thyroid (a natural dessicated T4, T3 med) had gluten. Anyone heard that?
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#19 Skylark

 
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Posted 07 April 2012 - 08:34 AM

My Dr did say he heard that Amour Thyroid (a natural dessicated T4, T3 med) had gluten. Anyone heard that?

Nope. Armour has confirmed their pills are gluten-free. http://www.glutenfre...gs.com/list.htm
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#20 hexon

 
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Posted 07 April 2012 - 03:00 PM

As a pharmacy student I can tell you that we aren't taught about celiac disease or even the word "gluten." We are taught the general information about most disease states, including Chrohns, PUD, and the other assortment of ulcer disease. However, with the majority of the health care field just now being brought up to snuff on gluten intolerances and celiac disease, you can expect pharmacy to eventually come in on the learning curve. Having dealt with gluten intolerance first hand, and having other celiac students in my class I can tell you that some of us will be more helpful than others. However, I can also say that many of the students I'm around daily know my dietary restrictions and will also learn from them and be more helpful to the gluten intolerant population later in life. Just be patient and respectful when you talk to your healthcare professionals and they'll learn from you and be must more willing to help you stay healthy.
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#21 Cujy

 
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Posted 07 April 2012 - 03:20 PM

Hexon, its very hard to be patient with someone who shrugs their shoulders and walks away from you, telling you that if its JUST an intolerance then no biggy, but IF it were an ALLERGY then well maybe we should look into it...they arnt asking questions and trying to inform themselves, that is the maddening part, there is no opportunity to explain yourself. Since my pharmacy here has a cross referencing program as Im sure most do, I asked if it shouldn't be put on my file and the pharmacist said well we could but it probably wouldn't make any difference!?!?!?
Patience that I had, is gone.
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#22 hexon

 
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Posted 07 April 2012 - 03:31 PM

Hexon, its very hard to be patient with someone who shrugs their shoulders and walks away from you, telling you that if its JUST an intolerance then no biggy, but IF it were an ALLERGY then well maybe we should look into it...they arnt asking questions and trying to inform themselves, that is the maddening part, there is no opportunity to explain yourself. Since my pharmacy here has a cross referencing program as Im sure most do, I asked if it shouldn't be put on my file and the pharmacist said well we could but it probably wouldn't make any difference!?!?!?
Patience that I had, is gone.


Next time perhaps you may try bringing a printout about celiac disease. Pharmacists understand anaphylaxis, but when a healthcare professional hears "intolerance" they immediately think, "oh, it's just going to give them gas." But if you educate them to celiac disease, not only are you helping yourself but also the next person who has to deal this this individual regarding gluten. If all else fails you may have to switch pharmacies, because after all, your health is the reason you're going to the pharmacy anyways.

Edit: the stock bottles of medications always come with a medication printout. You can ask your pharmacist to let you read through it to verify you can take it safely, since it contains all the ingredients. Just make sure to do it before you pay for your meds, because in the US once the medication leaves the store you can't legally take it back.
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#23 Cujy

 
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Posted 07 April 2012 - 03:44 PM

Next time perhaps you may try bringing a printout about celiac disease. Pharmacists understand anaphylaxis, but when a healthcare professional hears "intolerance" they immediately think, "oh, it's just going to give them gas." But if you educate them to celiac disease, not only are you helping yourself but also the next person who has to deal this this individual regarding gluten. If all else fails you may have to switch pharmacies, because after all, your health is the reason you're going to the pharmacy anyways.

Edit: the stock bottles of medications always come with a medication printout. You can ask your pharmacist to let you read through it to verify you can take it safely, since it contains all the ingredients. Just make sure to do it before you pay for your meds, because in the US once the medication leaves the store you can't legally take it back.


Woops sorry, quoted you and hit submit by accident...of course you're right that I would like to save someone else the trouble, BUT with my son having had a heart transplant/stroke/kidney failure/chronic lung disease, you get tired of explaining stuff to people, we call it "training" people amongst our family. Now with me having celiac, Im just too tired to explain anymore. I am taking the pred cuz I know its safe (I think!? :blink: ) and thats pretty much it, if it hasn't hurt me by now after three days, Im probably okay with it. Ive been trying to explain celiac to my family and friends, and thats it for now, maybe when everything dies down a bit and everyone around me finally GETS it, then I will venture out a bit more and possibly try to explain myself more.
Im still grieving the loss of my diet, and am cranky enough that my people skills just went whoosh down the toilet! :unsure:
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#24 melikamaui

 
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Posted 07 April 2012 - 03:49 PM

What a great scam. Pharmacist unwilling to check for allergen in prescribed medication and forcing a sale. She could have laid the box label down on a copy machine, she could have given you a phone number to call with the code on the box.... she could have done her JOB and checked, herself.... Unfortunately you went along with it.... You really need to contact your state's Attorney General office and file a complaint against this store.

AND WHAT IS GLUTEN DOING IN A CHILD'S ALLERGY MEDICATION, or for that matter, ANY OTC ANTIHISTAMINE ?

I went thru really extensive research two years ago attempting to find out just what the h*ll was in different kinds of otc Benedryl, because the packaging changed, the kind I used to take (adequately labeled, and safe) was no longer available, and all the website research I was pulling up would not give the ingredients for all the different permutations now available... the liquid this, the gelcap that, all in pretty colors.... horrible marketing. Foreign manufacture, imported. This is extremely dangerous.


This was actually for a non-prescription medicine. But in California they keep these particular allergy meds behind the pharmacy counter. If she had handed it to me she would have been breaking the law. I think it's a silly law, but what can you do? The AG would be on her side because she was following the letter of the law.
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#25 melikamaui

 
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Posted 07 April 2012 - 03:50 PM

Blut at least in doing so they didn't break the law


:P :blink: :unsure: :rolleyes:


Yup. Exactly!
:P
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#26 StephanieL

 
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Posted 07 April 2012 - 04:39 PM

Edit: the stock bottles of medications always come with a medication printout. You can ask your pharmacist to let you read through it to verify you can take it safely, since it contains all the ingredients. Just make sure to do it before you pay for your meds, because in the US once the medication leaves the store you can't legally take it back.



I have looked at these and have never found anything but "fillers" listed. Including Top 8 allergens. Where would this info be listed?
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#27 Cujy

 
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Posted 07 April 2012 - 05:16 PM

I have looked at these and have never found anything but "fillers" listed. Including Top 8 allergens. Where would this info be listed?

Not ALL the ingrediants are on that list, for sure not gluten specifically. Its not even on the pharmacists computer, they have no access to it, so even armed with a printout I wouldn't trust it, especially if I had celiac children. For myself Im knowingly taking a risk if I decide to take the meds, but no way would I take a chance with my kids.
They told me to call if I wanted to know (the manuf)
You can't bring meds back here either.
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#28 cait

 
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Posted 07 April 2012 - 05:31 PM

I have found a list of gluten-free meds through google searches, and that has been at least vaguely helpful. It's incredibly frustrating, though. I had multiple medical professionals tell me that the amount of gluten in my antidepressant wouldn't be a problem because it was so small-- just a wheat derivative in the coating. And yet, I felt so much better once I finally got off of it...
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Dad has Celiac
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Life vastly improved off gluten
Dunno what that makes me, but I'm not going back.
Now corn, soy, and dairy free

#29 Takala

 
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Posted 07 April 2012 - 08:25 PM


I think it's a silly law, but what can you do? The AG would be on her side because she was following the letter of the law.


What law ? This is clearly being abused by the store. She did not have to hand you anything, she merely had to do her job, which was to answer your questions as to product safety. She had the ability to do this. She refused to do it.

If you were serious about complaining about it, then, at this point you should contact an attorney and have them give you a professional opinion on whether or not this alleged pharmacist could legally withhold the ingredient information on a medication package from you, that you otherwise would have been within your legal rights to purchase as an over the counter medication.

The store was requiring the legal transaction of completing a contract (your releasing your private identity AND giving them money) before both parties had the full information of what it entailed. In other words, the store forced you to purchase a pig in a poke. She could have been then selling you a placebo, for example, and you would never have known the difference.

I don't care what the Attorney General of CA "thinks" about anything, because laws are subject to interpretation by the courts when they are abused by various commercial interests, and the opinion of the AG can be appealed to a higher court.
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#30 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 08 April 2012 - 03:24 AM

Not ALL the ingrediants are on that list, for sure not gluten specifically. Its not even on the pharmacists computer, they have no access to it, so even armed with a printout I wouldn't trust it, especially if I had celiac children. For myself Im knowingly taking a risk if I decide to take the meds, but no way would I take a chance with my kids.
They told me to call if I wanted to know (the manuf)
You can't bring meds back here either.

I find it infuriating that meds do not have to follow the same regs for binders that food does as far as labeling allergins.
The only thing we can do is find out the maker before we get the script, then go on the computer and put the makers name and the word contact in a search engine and then call the number that comes up. A long and frustrating process if you are ill or have a sick child. Things need to change with the label regs and they need to change now. I've wondered for a long time how many of the 'side effects' on drugs are due to undeclared inactive ingredients that people are reacting to rather than the actual drug itself.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)




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