Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Asian Flours And Starches
0

20 posts in this topic

This subject has been posted before without much response, but I thought I'd give it a try. There is a Thai grocery near my house and they carry rice and tapioca flour as well as potato starch. One brand they carry is Erawan. The owners say a lot of celiacs buy the flours. Has anyone been able to find out about possible cc issues with this or other asian companies? I sent out an email to Erawan several days ago, but nothing but silence so far. The flour is cheap and close by for me, but if I can't confirm it is made and packaged in a gluten free facility, I won't use it. There are Thai procuded wheat flours in the store so its not like thailand is especially a gluten free country.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

This subject has been posted before without much response, but I thought I'd give it a try. There is a Thai grocery near my house and they carry rice and tapioca flour as well as potato starch. One brand they carry is Erawan. The owners say a lot of celiacs buy the flours. Has anyone been able to find out about possible cc issues with this or other asian companies? I sent out an email to Erawan several days ago, but nothing but silence so far. The flour is cheap and close by for me, but if I can't confirm it is made and packaged in a gluten free facility, I won't use it. There are Thai procuded wheat flours in the store so its not like thailand is especially a gluten free country.

Oriental markets can be an inexpensive source for gluten-free flours. I looked them up online and it looks like they don't produce gluten flours at all? I would consider them safe and give them a try.

http://www.erawan.thailand.com/index.htm

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I buy my rice flour from an oriental store and have never had a problem with it, and I'm pretty sensitive. I've used it in a variety of recipes. I just wish I could master thai rice pancakes! :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oriental markets can be an inexpensive source for gluten-free flours. I looked them up online and it looks like they don't produce gluten flours at all? I would consider them safe and give them a try.

http://www.erawan.thailand.com/index.htm

Yeah, I checked out their website too but could not tell if they produced it or if they were just distributors who obtained it from others who produce who knows what else. They are called Erawan Marketing Co. so they may just buy it from whoever is cheapest that week. I'm not against giving it a try though.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been afraid of flour that isn't tested for gluten since that Tricia Thompson study. I skip the oriental store stuff and pay the extra for Bob's Red Mill.

If you do decide to try imported flour, also beware of bugs. I bought imported red rice and a couple months later it was full of moths! Fortunately I had put it in a canister that seals well so they didn't infest the pantry.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




I've had the bugs in non-imported flours, so I wouldn't blame it just on imported ones.

FWIW, I don't seem to react noticeably to small amounts of CC but I most certainly do react to any substantial amount of gluten, and I've yet to ever have a problem with a flour I bought at an Asian market.

richard

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been afraid of flour that isn't tested for gluten since that Tricia Thompson study. I skip the oriental store stuff and pay the extra for Bob's Red Mill.

If you do decide to try imported flour, also beware of bugs. I bought imported red rice and a couple months later it was full of moths! Fortunately I had put it in a canister that seals well so they didn't infest the pantry.

Can you tell me more about the study you mentioned? Edit: That's ok, I looked on line and found it. The chances of cc can be high without testing. It's just a shame that some of these asian sources may actually be gluten free and produced in gluten free facilities but we just can't be sure since the info is just not there. Still no answer to the email I sent them. Probably not a good sign.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An added bonus to purchasing rice flour in Asian stores is that it is finer than regular rice flour and thus better for cooking and baking.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An added bonus to purchasing rice flour in Asian stores is that it is finer than regular rice flour and thus better for cooking and baking.

Yes! Yes! Yes! . . . Cheaper (99 cents/lb) and finer ground. We prefer it to BRM. I buy Flying Horse brand. We haven't had any issues with it

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I first went gluten-free years ago, I purchased flour from the oriental market. Used it for about a year.Went for my yearly check-upwith tons of bloodwork. Came back I had high levels of lead... which I didn't have the year prior. Doctor questioned me & I told him what I was using. He stopped me & said rice flour & such from China are full of lead... Since that I have had no lead issues.Products from Thailand are"supposed"to be safe but I just don't take chances .. Cheap is not always better...

I felt no side effects from using oriental rice flours so I didn't know the damage I was causing to myself until the high lead level ...only found through blood work....

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I first went gluten-free years ago, I purchased flour from the oriental market. Used it for about a year.Went for my yearly check-upwith tons of bloodwork. Came back I had high levels of lead... which I didn't have the year prior. Doctor questioned me & I told him what I was using. He stopped me & said rice flour & such from China are full of lead... Since that I have had no lead issues.Products from Thailand are"supposed"to be safe but I just don't take chances .. Cheap is not always better...

I felt no side effects from using oriental rice flours so I didn't know the damage I was causing to myself until the high lead level ...only found through blood work....

Thanks for the info - I was unaware of this. Thankfully I do not use white rice flour often, anyway, as it is so low in nutritional value and so many flours work better in baking. It is excellent for crispy things such as tempura but often falls flat unless combined with other things when baking.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was totally dumb-founded when doc told me I had high lead levels...but I'm so glad this doc loves to run lots of blood work... I agree way better flour available...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was totally dumb-founded when doc told me I had high lead levels...but I'm so glad this doc loves to run lots of blood work... I agree way better flour available...

I can imagine! It would not be something you would ever think of. I am glad you mentioned it here.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I first went gluten-free years ago, I purchased flour from the oriental market. Used it for about a year.Went for my yearly check-upwith tons of bloodwork. Came back I had high levels of lead... which I didn't have the year prior. Doctor questioned me & I told him what I was using. He stopped me & said rice flour & such from China are full of lead... Since that I have had no lead issues.Products from Thailand are"supposed"to be safe but I just don't take chances .. Cheap is not always better...

I felt no side effects from using oriental rice flours so I didn't know the damage I was causing to myself until the high lead level ...only found through blood work....

:angry: It seems like there should be some restrictions in place to keep China from shipping their toxic things here! Kids toys and jewelry..and now food too? :o

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I first went gluten-free years ago, I purchased flour from the oriental market. Used it for about a year.Went for my yearly check-upwith tons of bloodwork. Came back I had high levels of lead... which I didn't have the year prior. Doctor questioned me & I told him what I was using. He stopped me & said rice flour & such from China are full of lead... Since that I have had no lead issues.Products from Thailand are"supposed"to be safe but I just don't take chances .. Cheap is not always better...

I felt no side effects from using oriental rice flours so I didn't know the damage I was causing to myself until the high lead level ...only found through blood work....

Wow, that's good to know. It's sad but after the melamine thing and the arsenic in imported apple juice, I am a little afraid of food from China. Not to say US food is always safe, but there seems to be more monitoring here.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree junk from China is just that JUNK

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Erawan Brand is perfectly fine. It is widely sold in Australia: and to do that, they have to declare gluten, manufacturing lines and contamination ...

These are the ones that I use ..

Tapioca starch

glutinous or sweet rice flour

Rice Flour

Potato starch

That's encouraging. Might just have to give it a try.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Erawan brand is Thai not mainland Chinese .. and the Tung Chun Soy Sauce & Canned Food Co Ltd has been in Hong Kong since 1876 ..

Lead levels are a world-wide problem.

High levels of lead have been detected in European, American, and most First World croplands due to it's use in petroleum products especially from combustion engines, the wide-spread use of lead paints that breakdown over time, and the use of processed "biosolids" {polite word} in agriculture. And then there is the lead levels in the birds, animals and fish that we eat ..

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Auzzi

You are correct Lead is worldwide... But for me I do an extensive screening yearly for lead,mercury & so on.The only thingI changed in my living habits was the flour ........And I did mention that I hear products from Thailand are safe but I choose to not use these as well...

Things coming from China (toys, food) are not safe & I would rather just not use these things for my family than down the road find out I caused harm to a family member because I took the less expensive way out... not to say that the US does not have issues as well.. And also for economy reasons I try to buy US made goods...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,640
    • Total Posts
      921,549
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • That's great to hear you are feeling better Nightsky.  I really think when our GI systems are in distress already that it doesn't take much to set off symptoms.  Once I eliminated the other foods that cause me symptoms that helped a lot too.  And added some extra vitamin D to my diet and selenium. Many of us have developed reactions to other foods besides gluten and need to avoid them to keep symptoms at bay.  For me nightshades, carrots, soy, dairy, and celery all cause symptoms.  It took me awhile to figure out all those food culprits, but it made a big difference getting them out of my diet. But we are all individuals, and our bodies react individually.  So you may or may not have additional food intolerances develop. Celiac is one of those life journey things and we learn as we go.  Just keep the bottle of aspirin handy!
    • I know that Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce  in the US is gluten free, I also know that in Canada it is NOT. This is a very reliable site: http://www.glutenfreedietitian.com/vinegar/ But it is in the US. I'm agast that the Irish Celiac Society says malt vinegar is gluten free.  I wouldn't use it. No sense taking any chance at all.
    • You should never have cut out gluten until you had the biopsy done. It's much worse to have to go back on after you've been off gluten for a while. There's no way I could ever do the gluten challenge after being off gluten for even a month because my reactions got so dramatically worse.  Stress definately can trigger celiac- before I was diagnosed - it got the worst after surgery and after a stressful time planning my daughters wedding. 
    • Hi not diagnosed celiac, Welcome to the forum! Your doctor should be sent to remedial celiac disease training.  Since that probably won't happen, I suggest you find a new doctor.  He doesn't know what he's doing when it comes to diagnosing celiac disease. You should not have gone gluten-free before completing all celiac disease testing.  The testing for celiac disease depends on the immune reaction being active.  Removing gluten before testing removes the antigen that causes the immune system to react, and lowers the chances of getting a correct test result dramatically.  The University of Chicago celiac disease center recommends: ******************************************** http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/what-is-a-gluten-challenge/ Prior to blood testing we recommend 12 weeks of eating gluten. Prior to an endoscopic biopsy we recommend 2 weeks of eating gluten. In the case of a severe reaction to gluten, a medical professional may opt to shorten the 12-week challenge and move immediately to an endoscopic biopsy. May, 2013 ******************************************** So you will need to go back to eating gluten before your endoscopy.  That may cause worse symptoms than before when you were eating gluten.  So it would have been better to do all testing before going gluten-free. Can you search for a celiac disease support group in your area?  They exist in many parts of the USA and world.  They can be a good place to get a knowledgeable doctor recommendation.  There is also a doctors subsection of this forum where you can search to see if any doctors in your area were recommended.
    • Hi All, I'm new to this and very confused! I have Lea & Perrins WC sauce, it lists it's first ingredient as Malt Vinegar.  I have the Coeliac Society of Ireland Food List 2015 here, and it says "All Vinegars are Gluten Free including Malt Vinegar." Doesn't that mean that L&P Worcestershire sauce is safe?   Their website states " Lea & Perrins® Worcestershire Sauce is cholesterol free, fat free, preservative free, gluten free and has 80% less sodium than soy sauce. " I'm cooking for my coeliac niece, can't afford to make a mistake!
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,643
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    moojoo
    Joined