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Shared Equipment Warnings...
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Today at the grocery, there were some great items that had the warning "manufactered on shared equipment that manufacters wheat". I have been told that is basically a cover-your-tail move in case of accidently exposure. I wonder if you guys go ahead and eat them or not. One was labeled gluten free with a tag on the shelf yet still had that warning! I went ahead and bought it but not sure if I should have. I know it can happen but is it COMMON that people react with just the shared equipment.

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Not sure what other people do but our nutritionist told us to start with the least restrictions (No gluten ingredients) and see how that works. If we were still having problems, we would then move to the next level - no gluten ingredients and NOT processed on shared lines. After that, I'm not sure - maybe only whole foods and no processed foods at all? We are not there yet. But, after my son's 6 month blood test (no change) it was clear we needed to step it up. He doesn't get many symptoms so sometimes it is hard to tell if he is getting cross-contaminated. Stepping it up also means we don't eat out anymore (unless it is a gluten-free place) and we don't eat food prepared in other people's kitchens.

I guess you just need to see what works best for you. If you are just starting out, I would stay away from all that stuff for a while, then you can try adding things one at a time and see how you feel.

Cara

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I won't eat food off shared lines ever since I had a bad reaction to a food on shared lines with soya products.

spent too much of my young life sick and weak to take chances with food.

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Today at the grocery, there were some great items that had the warning "manufactered on shared equipment that manufacters wheat". I have been told that is basically a cover-your-tail move in case of accidently exposure. I wonder if you guys go ahead and eat them or not. One was labeled gluten free with a tag on the shelf yet still had that warning! I went ahead and bought it but not sure if I should have. I know it can happen but is it COMMON that people react with just the shared equipment.

When I see that something is produced on shared equipment I won't eat it. I'm even nervous about a shared facility, because I have no idea what is shared..or if it's likely to come in contact with the gluten-free stuff?

That's just me. I would call myself very sensitive though. I seem to react to things that some others can tolerate.

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I avoid anything processed on shared equipment with wheat products.

It may be safe for some, but I choose not to try it. That's just me.

I was too sick for too long and trace gluten does me in for weeks.

With so many dedicated facilities, I find I have plenty of options.

:)

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I have always avoided anything made/packaged on shared equipment. I do not avoid things made in the same facility as, and have not yet been burned by it. It's rare that I buy a 'same facility' product, and it is usually something canned/jarred, adn from a brand I know is trustworthy.

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I avoid anything with a 'shared equipment" warning--have gotten sick every time I've decided something sounded good enough to try.

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My advice would also be to avoid it. Shared equipment means cross contamination.. It's the same as someone dropping a piece of bread in your food then taking it out. It's actually what I'm finding trouble with most. My husband keeps forgetting that cross contamination is a problem. He bought bresaola that was sliced on a shared slicer for other gluten-containing products. I barely slept that night and was irritated like crazy the day after.. We were baffled about my mood until my husband thought back and realized his mistake.

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