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Anaheim / Disneyland Gluten Free Restaurants / Products?


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24 replies to this topic

#16 anabananakins

 
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Posted 18 May 2012 - 06:52 AM

I'm Australian and I'm used to walking a lot (and Sydney is really hilly) and I had no problem walking around Anaheim, it's flat as a pancake. I felt safe wandering around, it was all families. I even walked alone from the park to my hotel around closing time (there were crowds of families walking to their hotels too and my friends were at a hotel on a different shuttle route to me). I stayed at the Sheraton Park Hotel on South Harbor. Disneyland itself is awesome for gluten free, and there is a PF Changs on Katella and a McDonalds on South Harbor but beyond that, I think options were going to be a bit limited.

That said, while I was happy walking around, food4less looks like a long walk, the blocks are really big. And you're walking away from the main park area on a busy road. I had a look on google maps and it looks like a nice suburban area so the supermarket is probably decent sized but I personally wouldn't walk there.
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#17 rosetapper23

 
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Posted 18 May 2012 - 06:29 PM

Amber,

I hadn't realized that you'd responded personally to my posting...until now. My daughter lives four blocks from Bondi Beach. Whenever I visit her, I'm always astounded that the neighborhood bakeries offer gluten-free pastries, muffins, and breads.
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#18 amber

 
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Posted 19 May 2012 - 02:35 AM

I'm Australian and I'm used to walking a lot (and Sydney is really hilly) and I had no problem walking around Anaheim, it's flat as a pancake. I felt safe wandering around, it was all families. I even walked alone from the park to my hotel around closing time (there were crowds of families walking to their hotels too and my friends were at a hotel on a different shuttle route to me). I stayed at the Sheraton Park Hotel on South Harbor. Disneyland itself is awesome for gluten free, and there is a PF Changs on Katella and a McDonalds on South Harbor but beyond that, I think options were going to be a bit limited.

That said, while I was happy walking around, food4less looks like a long walk, the blocks are really big. And you're walking away from the main park area on a busy road. I had a look on google maps and it looks like a nice suburban area so the supermarket is probably decent sized but I personally wouldn't walk there.


Thanks for your reply. I'm sure it will be fine walking around. I think I will just get a cab to one of the health food stores to get some gluten-free supplies for my daughters breakfast. The rest of the meals we will eat at Disney and places like PF changs. We are only there 3 nights then off to New York which seems to be the best city for gluten-free in the USA from what I have read.
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#19 amber

 
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Posted 19 May 2012 - 02:43 AM

Amber,

I hadn't realized that you'd responded personally to my posting...until now. My daughter lives four blocks from Bondi Beach. Whenever I visit her, I'm always astounded that the neighborhood bakeries offer gluten-free pastries, muffins, and breads.


:) Bondi Beach would be an interesting place to live. The beach is a great people watching place on a hot summers day. We really enjoy watching Bondi Rescue. Have you seen it? It is a reality show based on the day to day activities of the lifeguards at Bondi Beach. We have been to Bondi once and I remember their being a pizza place somewhere where they did a very nice gluten free pizza. I don't know how long it has been since you were last here but I have noticed more and more gluten free everywhere (well here in Melbourne at least). We just back from dinner at a local restaurant and my daughter had a delicious gluten free spaghetti with calamari and prawns. They told us they could do any of the pastas gluten free and most of the main meals were gluten free also. We could have gone to at least 6 or 7 other restaurants very close by that had gluten free options so yes, gluten free is definately booming here.
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#20 rosetapper23

 
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Posted 19 May 2012 - 09:31 AM

I actually visited my daughter last November, and the next time I visit, we plan to fly to Melbourne for a few days. My daughter says it reminds her of Europe.

Yes, Australia is far superior to the US when it comes to restaurants that are willing to accommodate people with gluten sensitivity. In Cairnes, I was able to order hamburgers with gluten-free buns, and there's a Brazilian barbecue place in Sydney where almost everything on the menu is automatically gluten free (including the cheesy bread and the pasta). I'm also amazed at how well educated and aware most Australians are. Sometimes when I'd order a gluten-free meal, another customer would turn to me and ask, "Oh, do you have celiac?" Here in the States, hardly anyone has even heard of celiac. Funny thing--when I went on a snorkeling trip to the Great Barrier Reef in Cairnes, four out of the 23 passengers on the boat had celiac disease. The crew told me, "There's always at least one of you blokes on every trip we make!"

Oh, yeah, I LOVE Australia! So, just be careful at restaurants outside of Disneyland--the servers and cooks aren't very well educated. You'll find that a lot of the restaurant workers in Southern California are immigrants, and they possess a low level of education. I usually just buy fresh food at a supermarket rather than risk eating in any of the restaurants there. That's why I just eat at Disneyland exclusively--no reason to go elsewhere.
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#21 amber

 
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Posted 16 June 2012 - 11:24 PM

I actually visited my daughter last November, and the next time I visit, we plan to fly to Melbourne for a few days. My daughter says it reminds her of Europe.

Yes, Australia is far superior to the US when it comes to restaurants that are willing to accommodate people with gluten sensitivity. In Cairnes, I was able to order hamburgers with gluten-free buns, and there's a Brazilian barbecue place in Sydney where almost everything on the menu is automatically gluten free (including the cheesy bread and the pasta). I'm also amazed at how well educated and aware most Australians are. Sometimes when I'd order a gluten-free meal, another customer would turn to me and ask, "Oh, do you have celiac?" Here in the States, hardly anyone has even heard of celiac. Funny thing--when I went on a snorkeling trip to the Great Barrier Reef in Cairnes, four out of the 23 passengers on the boat had celiac disease. The crew told me, "There's always at least one of you blokes on every trip we make!"

Oh, yeah, I LOVE Australia! So, just be careful at restaurants outside of Disneyland--the servers and cooks aren't very well educated. You'll find that a lot of the restaurant workers in Southern California are immigrants, and they possess a low level of education. I usually just buy fresh food at a supermarket rather than risk eating in any of the restaurants there. That's why I just eat at Disneyland exclusively--no reason to go elsewhere.


Sorry I didn't see your post until now. Great to hear you had such a good experience when you were in Australia with regards to gluten free. That is amazing that 4 out of 23 passengers on the boat tour were celiac! Yes, celiacs seem to be everywhere these days. Thanks for your advice regarding Disneyland. We will probably eat most of our meals in Disneyland as we can trust that they know what they are doing. Did you need to make reservations before you got to Disney or could you just turn up at lunch or dinner? We will be going in September so it is not the busiest time of year.

If you do end up coming to Melbourne let me know and I will tell you about some gluten free friendly places to eat.
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#22 anabananakins

 
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Posted 20 June 2012 - 07:24 PM

Did you need to make reservations before you got to Disney or could you just turn up at lunch or dinner?



Not Rose but I can answer this one :) I didn't have reservations for lunch and had no problems with that (we went to the Village Haus). It was super crowded (I was there Labor Day weekend) but the person taking my order called over one of the cooks when I said gluten free and he handled it specially. For dinner, we had reservations at Ariel's Grotto because it was part of the package we had for the World of Color. The chef came out to our table to speak to me personally about my order/meal and they substituted some stuff that was on the shared platter.. it was great and I didn't get sick.

Plus the hand out I got from the town hall listed snacks being sold around the place... so I could put myself into a sugar coma on fairy floss and have no way of blaming it on gluten :)

I could live at Disney, so long as I stayed away from the "It's a Small World Ride" *shudders*
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#23 rosetapper23

 
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Posted 20 June 2012 - 10:07 PM

I agree--I could LIVE at Disneyland year round and be a happy camper. I wish I could just move into the Disneyland Hotel and take up residence. The gluten-free food is abundant and tasty--and I've never felt safer.

As for reservations, it's advisable to make reservations for dinner at the nicer restaurants. Then the chef can be alerted to come out and speak to you about your special dietary needs. Lunch isn't so much of a hassle since you can eat anywhere you'd like (as long as you have the information from the customer service desk). Really--all you have to say is that you must eat a gluten-free diet, and a specially-assigned chef will be called forward to help you...even at snack shacks). You're going to have the time of your life!
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#24 amber

 
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Posted 21 June 2012 - 05:55 PM

Not Rose but I can answer this one :) I didn't have reservations for lunch and had no problems with that (we went to the Village Haus). It was super crowded (I was there Labor Day weekend) but the person taking my order called over one of the cooks when I said gluten free and he handled it specially. For dinner, we had reservations at Ariel's Grotto because it was part of the package we had for the World of Color. The chef came out to our table to speak to me personally about my order/meal and they substituted some stuff that was on the shared platter.. it was great and I didn't get sick.

Plus the hand out I got from the town hall listed snacks being sold around the place... so I could put myself into a sugar coma on fairy floss and have no way of blaming it on gluten :)

I could live at Disney, so long as I stayed away from the "It's a Small World Ride" *shudders*


Thank you for you input - sounds wonderful!
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#25 amber

 
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Posted 21 June 2012 - 05:56 PM

I agree--I could LIVE at Disneyland year round and be a happy camper. I wish I could just move into the Disneyland Hotel and take up residence. The gluten-free food is abundant and tasty--and I've never felt safer.

As for reservations, it's advisable to make reservations for dinner at the nicer restaurants. Then the chef can be alerted to come out and speak to you about your special dietary needs. Lunch isn't so much of a hassle since you can eat anywhere you'd like (as long as you have the information from the customer service desk). Really--all you have to say is that you must eat a gluten-free diet, and a specially-assigned chef will be called forward to help you...even at snack shacks). You're going to have the time of your life!



That all sounds fabulous! It's great to be able to go somewhere and not have to stress about where to get food. Disney have done a wonderful job in making the Disney experience a good one for everyone.
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