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#1 KNG

 
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Posted 18 April 2012 - 04:05 PM

Hi everyone,

My name is Katie. I'm 21 and I found out a few days ago that I am gluten intolerant (I did the enterolab test). I'm not really sure what compelled me to take it. Just a feeling, I guess. I mean, I've always felt a little bloated but I have never had extreme symptoms like a lot of other people.

Anyway, going gluten-free is going to be a big challenge for me. I like to eat out a lot and now I can't have my favorite foods, which sucks. Especially since I know my friends will continue to go to these places without me. They don't understand that I can't eat gluten anymore, even though I always have. It's getting annoying. It's not like this is some diet fad I'm doing or whatever.

I guess my biggest challenge will be figuring out what to eat. I tried some glutino (I think) bread and wow...it's pretty terrible. So dry and almost stale tasting!

Anyway, I look forward to meeting you all, and learning from you!

Katie :)
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#2 mushroom

 
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Posted 18 April 2012 - 04:58 PM

Hi Katie, and welcome to the board.

Yes, probably the biggest challenge a person who is gluten intolerant faces is not the obvious one of eating gluten free, but in dealing with the reactions from friends and family to your gluten free status :rolleyes: We have all walked that particular parth, and sometimes it can seem like you are walking a tightrope. They have all seen you hoeing into gluten goodies previously, so what has changed? Well, what has changed is your body's reaction to gluten, which has been progressively becoming more unpleasant to the point that you investigated why, and you have now found out that the reaction is a harmful one which coujld lead to more serious problems in the future if you continue to eat it, so therefore you must eliminate it - all of it!! That is really all the explanation that is needed, and you do not have to make excuses. And yes, they will probably go to those places without you :( but if you handle it well and they are 'good' friends they should start to be respectful of your needs too and let you choose a place where you will feel safe eating.

Evenutally you will learn how to make substitutes for practically every goody that you are having to give up (although good bread is a problem - have you tried Udi's or Rudi's?? they make good sandwick style bread (often you will find it in the freezer section, sometimes fresh). We have a wonderful recipe section on the forum where you can find how to make practically anything you are used to (and lots of things you are not yet used to). But eating out is always going to be a bit problematic, particularly at your stage of life where hanging out with friends at fast food restaurants is so BIG!

One necessity of getting by is to always have food with you - in your purse, in your car, have a stash of food readily available so that if you find yourself in a situation where there is nothing you can eat you will not have to starve while watching everyone else eat. Things like nuts, trail mix, Lara and Kind bars, dried fruits will stand you in good stead. Another coping mechanism when you know you will be going to some place where you can't eat is to eat before you go and then just buy a drink (or if it is safe, some french fries). Taking a dinner plate of food with you to a meal at the home of friends and family is perfectly acceptable and less stressful than eating food cooked by someone who doesn't 'quite' understand gluten free and cross-contamination - which is probably the riskiest eating.

Anyway, again welcome and settle in and take a look around. This place is packed with useful information and friendly people who will give you a helping hand. :)
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

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Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

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#3 Marilyn R

 
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Posted 18 April 2012 - 05:37 PM

I welcome you to, Katie!

Forum members/moderators are going to start wondering if I'm working for Against The Grain. Their bagels and pizza are so good! It may just be my older oven, but I bake the pizza for about 5 minutes longer than it says to, and let it rest for a few minutes before slicing. I don't feel like I'm missing out on anything when I have that product. And the bread you have may be good toasted. (Toaster not grilled.) You can still have BLT's!.
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Positive improvement from elimination diet. Mother dx'd by Mayo Clinic in late 1980s. Negative blood tests and Upper & Lower GI biopsy. Parathyroidectomy 12/09. Recurring high calcium level 4/10. Gluten-free 4/10. Soy & Dairy Free 6/10. Corn free 7/10. Grain free except rice 8/10. Legume free 6/11. Fighting the battle of the battle within myself, and I'm going to win!

As of 2/12, tolerating dairy, corn, legumes and some soy, but I limit soy to tamari sauce or modest soy additives. Won't ever try quinoa again!

Discoid Lupus from skin biopsy 2011, discovered 2/12 when picking up medical records. Systemic Lupus Dx 6/12. Shingles 10/12.

#4 JonsLoveBugg

 
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Posted 28 May 2012 - 06:54 AM

Hi Katie-

I know at first it's pretty depressing and you feel like your never going to be able to eat good foods ever again but that's not the case!

I have bought enzymes that are supposed to help me digest gluten but I'm honestly terrified to take them! And I alway tell my hubby (who is constantly trying to get me to take them to just try!) but I always say once I think of a food that I loved being gluten filled that I ant get gluten free then I'll take them for that. (because being sick for a week isn't worth some mediocre gluten filled snack! ) but to be honest there is no food that is gluten filled that I can't get gluten free that is just as good!

As far as bread goes, yeah that sucks... But I've found that Schar makes the best bread closest to gluten filled. And no it's not frozen! If you have a wegmans grocery store try there or go on glutenfreely.com or even amazon and you can order it! It's the best. And against the grain ANYTHING is amazing!!!!!!! There rolls taste like donuts if you just microwave them and add butter! Why would I eat gluten with those?!?!

Good luck!
Natalie
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