Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Igg Testing -Recent Article Questions Reliability
0

18 posts in this topic

THIS ARTICLE WAS POSTED IN THE PUBLICATIONS SECTION, but I thought some of you might find it interesting.

I paid (out of pocket) for IgG testing back in 2010 and it showed a severe intolerance to soybean, BUT NOT GLUTEN AND CASEIN. I was, however, gluten-free and dairy free for 5 weeks at the time, on a trial run to see if it would help me. (I did not know I was a celiac yet and my (then) doctor said it would not affect the test results.)

Given that I AM a celiac, that was a pretty dangerous assumption on his part and I continued to ingest gluten and go downhill.

( But that is a story for another day) :rolleyes:

The article, however, suggests these tests are not necessarily valuable at all.

Be wary of food intolerance tests — they may not live up to their claims

Published: April 19. 2012 4:00AM PST

If you’re considering taking a food intolerance test, it’s best to read the company’s marketing materials with a critical eye.

A quick scan of websites selling food intolerance tests revealed some inaccurate statements.

Here are some of the most common:

Claim: Food intolerances are caused by eating a repetitive diet; this overloads the immune system and the body responds by rejecting those foods.

Reality: “The gut-associated immune system is well-equipped to deal with loads of antigenic material, and there is just no evidence that it may become overloaded by exposure to large amounts of the same antigen,” said Stefano Guandalini, founder and medical director of the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center.

Claim: The number of Americans with food allergies may have risen to a whopping 60 to 75 percent.

Reality: Food allergies, which are different from food intolerance, affect 5 percent of U.S. children younger than age 5 and 4 percent of older children and adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

As many as 1 in 3 people think they have a food allergy, but only about 1 in 28 have a food allergy that has been confirmed by a health care official, the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases says.

Claim: Most insurance covers food intolerance testing.

Reality: Not true.

Claim: Hair sampling is a safe and noninvasive method of revealing nutritional deficiencies.

Reality: Hair is made up of a protein, keratin, that can be analyzed to determine its mineral content.

That data can be used to find out if the body is lacking in certain minerals, but it can’t tell you whether you have food intolerances, allergist Lee Freund wrote in “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Food Allergies.”

Double-blind studies haven’t shown any diagnostic value for this test.

Claim: The IgG blood test is 95 percent reliable.

Reality: The test is prone to false positives and not considered reliable by any U.S. or European allergy or immunology society.

— Chicago Tribune

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

I found the article interesting too. I've seen several tests offered that are supposed to tell your intolerances, and have been tempted to try them out of desperation.

Instead, I've just ordered the Fed Up book by Sue Dengate after Skylark mentioned the Failsafe diet. It tells in detail how to figure out intolerances on your own...and I think that's the key. We must figure it out on our own.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This article makes me angry. Says the testing may not be accurate but doesn't say why. Just like celiac testing may not be accurate. Because if you don't eat gluten prior to the test it may not be!

This article has caused people to call me crazy and say I'm am idiot for believing my test results.

I just know that I got better after the test. YMMV.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

THIS ARTICLE WAS POSTED IN THE PUBLICATIONS SECTION, but I thought some of you might find it interesting.

I paid (out of pocket) for IgG testing back in 2010 and it showed a severe intolerance to soybean, BUT NOT GLUTEN AND CASEIN. I was, however, gluten-free and dairy free for 5 weeks at the time, on a trial run to see if it would help me. (I did not know I was a celiac yet and my (then) doctor said it would not affect the test results.)

I had an IgG food test a year ago. Two of the items that I showed an intolerance to, I have not eaten in over thirty years--lobster and lamb. Interestingly, I showed an intolerance to gliaden but not to gluten or wheat--?????

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had an IgG food test a year ago. Two of the items that I showed an intolerance to, I have not eaten in over thirty years--lobster and lamb. Interestingly, I showed an intolerance to gliaden but not to gluten or wheat--?????

That IS interesting!

:blink:

Since the premise of IgG testing is that you have to be actively consuming a specific food protein for an antibody to it to show, how is that possible??

The "treatment" is to REMOVE that food protein so the antibodies die down and theoretically, you can tolerate them once more.

hmmm....

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




This article makes me angry. Says the testing may not be accurate but doesn't say why.

Actually, it does say why (according to the medical experts).

If these tests measure high antibodies to food proteins, and this doctor is saying there is no evidence that it even happens, how can it be measured?

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That IS interesting!

:blink:

Since the premise of IgG testing is that you have to be actively consuming a specific food protein for an antibody to it to show, how is that possible??

The "treatment" is to REMOVE that food protein so the antibodies die down and theoretically, you can tolerate them once more.

hmmm....

Our tests showed positive to things we have never eaten or things I haven't eaten in years. They are not things that sound appealing so I will not be eating them.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not every thing published is true.....if you're at wits end and can spend $100 to take this easy test, I don't see what's the big deal. It makes the elimination process easier. It worked for me. :) everyone I know personally who did this feel better from following the results of this test and I've found it quite reliable!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not every thing published is true.....if you're at wits end and can spend $100 to take this easy test, I don't see what's the big deal. It makes the elimination process easier. It worked for me. :) everyone I know personally who did this feel better from following the results of this test and I've found it quite reliable!

I feel the same. Immediately lost 6 pounds, the bloated stomach, the upset stomach. The sinus issues.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aren't some of those quotes ignoring leaky gut & the implications of things in the bloodstream that don't belong?

Aha ..there!

The Dr starts sentence w/ "The gut-associated immune system" - so in that textbook-style context he might be 100% right - as long as nobody ever has compromised intestinal permeability.

But leaky gut's well-known now & quotes like that regarding what should happen in an isolated gut might be fine for a textbook but appear misleading when WHOLE immune system & leaky gut & actual patients are added to the conversation.

Even the Tribune article had effective patient testimony.

I did one of the 100+ foods intol tests, btw & thought it was worth it. Long time & a lotta $ ago.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Long before my DH (dermatitis herpetiformis) became spectacularly evident one day I had one of those 'oh... wow' moments. I was in a health food shop and the owner/naturapthy asked me ( after inquiring about something to help my severe hayfever) what food I craved. Made me think.. eggs came to mind at the time. Two years later turns out that iodine is a problem for me (in the yolks).

After that day I've thought lots about the foods I've avoided and/or craved and pretty much all of them have been a problem one way or another.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FWIW, here are Dr. Weil's thoughts on this. (since the maintream medical community does not seem to believe in their reliability). If people feel they are useful, then by all means, they should use them.

"With certain exceptions (such as sensitivities to lactose and gluten, both of which have a genetic basis), food intolerances are often highly individual and mysterious. In some cases, they are due to physical or emotional stress or exposure to environmental toxins rather than a reaction to the foods themselves. Lactose intolerance results from a deficiency of the enzyme lactase, which is needed to digest the sugar in milk. At least one out of 10 people worldwide shares this deficiency and develops bloating, abdominal pain and, often, diarrhea when consuming milk. Gluten intolerance is caused by an abnormal immune response to the major protein in wheat and some other grains.

I discussed the issue of testing for food intolerances with Randy Horwitz, M.D., Ph.D., medical director of the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona, who specializes in immunology. We agree that the only reliable approach to determining food intolerances or sensitivities is to use avoidance and provocative testing - in other words, an elimination diet followed by a "challenge" to see whether a suspect food really does set off a reaction.

Dr. Horwitz notes that when food sensitivities - not true allergies - are a problem, traditional allergy tests such as the IgE RAST blood tests or skin prick tests often yield negative results. He says that in his practice, he has not seen uniformly good results with IgG anti-food blood tests, applied kinesiology (muscle strength testing), or "live blood" microscopic analysis, all of which have been advocated by some practitioners as ways of determining food intolerances. Results "go all the way from questionable to downright useless," he says.

Instead, he prefers to ask patients to keep a record for a few weeks of everything they eat and any symptoms that develop in response to specific foods. This can help narrow the list of foods that may be causing problems. The next step is a defined food elimination diet. This can be an avoidance diet of patient-defined triggers, a "hypoallergenic" diet for four to six weeks, or a rotation diet, in which new foods are introduced sequentially. Once symptoms have been associated with a food or food group, the intolerance can be confirmed with a "challenge" in which the patient is given the suspect food and then watched to see if symptoms develop (This isn't practical when symptoms are severe).

Sometimes you can overcome food intolerances by avoiding the food or foods to which you're sensitive for a few months. Then, you can try reintroducing each food (separately) on a regular basis beginning with tiny amounts. Eat some every day, gradually increasing the portions. With luck, you'll find that you are able to develop tolerance to foods that have previously bothered you."

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The IGG test was the way that my mom, children and I found that we were probably Celiac. We have done really well an a gluten-free diet and avoid the other foods that got high scores (as necessary for each person). After lifetimes of unexplained symptoms, debilitating allergies, and shifting diagnoses we are starting to feel better thanks to that test. Elimination diets never worked for us, as there were too many things to eliminate (and it really does take a rocket scientist to discover all of the secret things where gluten lies hidden).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am glad I did my IGG testing. There were some things that showed up I was surprised I was eating. However, did you realize that dried seaweed may contain crab and other sea creatures? I mostly discovered that I needed a rotational diet for Leaky gut. I am afterwards feeling quite well. It may be too soon to tell for sure. I am so glad that I found that chicken and eggs were not a problem for me. The test can show some safe foods. But yeah, if you haven't been eating them they will be negative.

It is great with me if you want to try paleo, elimination diet, or food journals to accomplish a healthy diet for you. I just wanted to say that some things are not accepted in the media, but that doesn't mean they are not a great help to many people. I can't think the immuno suppressing drug a doctor offered me was a great way to deal with food intolerances!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The IGG test was the way that my mom, children and I found that we were probably Celiac. We have done really well an a gluten-free diet and avoid the other foods that got high scores (as necessary for each person). After lifetimes of unexplained symptoms, debilitating allergies, and shifting diagnoses we are starting to feel better thanks to that test. Elimination diets never worked for us, as there were too many things to eliminate (and it really does take a rocket scientist to discover all of the secret things where gluten lies hidden).

How could an IgG test say that it was celiac? My daughter and I have had this done. Twice she tested positive for gluten and wheat and once for spelt. But it never said anything about celiac and now wheat, gluten and spelt are not problems for her.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for this post Irishheart. I looked into this testing awhile ago and came to the same conclusion. It seems that it can be an expensive way to help you choose items for diet elimination/challenge studies, but that is the best way to determine if something bothers you or not.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How could an IgG test say that it was celiac? My daughter and I have had this done. Twice she tested positive for gluten and wheat and once for spelt. But it never said anything about celiac and now wheat, gluten and spelt are not problems for her.

It doen't say you are celiac. In fact, we don't know for sure that we are, we just suspect as the symptoms match up and it is the whole family. The test simply told us some things to try to eliminate. Eliminating gluten made a big difference. Essentially, I am saying that I am grateful for the IGG test as it led us to forums like this, and we are getting better.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This article makes me angry. Says the testing may not be accurate but doesn't say why. Just like celiac testing may not be accurate. Because if you don't eat gluten prior to the test it may not be!

This article has caused people to call me crazy and say I'm am idiot for believing my test results.

I just know that I got better after the test. YMMV.

I agree. I was food tested for IGG and it helped me. I never would have figured out tapioca, turmeric, nutmeg, and artificial flavors were a problem? I know it is true because I write down everything I eat and how i feel. There was a definite connection. I did the test several months later and found out I can eat these things again, but now have problems with honey and a few other things. Meanwhile my gut is healing and eventually I will not have these food problems anymore. It is so important to rotate your food, which then you get different nutrients. I know many celiacs who are good with their diets but are still suffering from food sensitivities. They have brain fog or are easily crabby. I did the Elisa Food testing and you can go through them with your own doctor. Look up "Better Lab tests now" You get a kit and your doctor can do the blood draw.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      103,634
    • Total Posts
      918,415
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • amalgam dental fillings - remove or not?
      My friend, I'm sorry to hear of your pain. I don't know if mercury is related, but I will give you my brief experience. I went through so many health issues, medications, and dr's and nobody could find anything wrong with me, but I knew something was wrong. I've been through many doctors, shots, pills, etc and nothing helped. For me it all came down to gluten. I had blood tests that shown the antibodies and the endoscopy that proved I had celiac, which I don't think is needed. If your body makes the antibodies I can't help to believe you have it. Anyway, long story short. If you are sick, you are sick and if a doctor can't find the reason, move on to a new doctor. Celiac, at least for me was simple. Stop eating gluten and every other health problem goes away. I have 30 + year old amalgam fillings and I feel amazing as long as I don't put anything in my mouth that isn't naturally gluten free, which means I only eat meat and vegetables. Our bodies are all different. I guess my only advice to you is if you're sick, your sick. Nobody lives inside your body but you and you know best if you feel better. Don't be afraid to stand up for yourself. 
    • healthy bread recipe?
      Ok thank you for the input! I am happy to hear what you think about her biopsy. Her GI is actually getting a second opinion from the celiac specialist. Our appointment is in a week. I have always thought she had celiac too. I asked them to do a biopsy years ago and they did but it was normal. She has more neurological symptoms than GI. She has headache and POTS. But she was reacting to all kinds of foods all of the sudden a few months ago. The low histamine diet really helped and she tolerates more foods now. I make almost everything from scratch, there is no gluten anywhere in the house and I don't use gums because she and I react to them. Breakfast is the hardest. Eggs are high histamine, she can't have oats, can't have fermented foods (yogurt), Breakfast is a nightmare. Many fruits and veggies are high histamine. She eats the ones she can tolerate. That's why I was asking about breads. What do you eat for breakfast? Are flax seeds safe or are they like oats? I can't find any flax seeds that say certified gluten free.
    • Could this be celiac or is it really just IBS?
      Hi! So I've never posted in a medical forum but y'all seem super helpful so I figured I'd throw this out there! Sorry if this is long lol. Basically, I'm a 22 year old who has stomach problems for as long as I can remember and it's recently gotten worse. I remember having bad stomach aches and diarrhea off and on since I was little. I finally told my parents and saw a GI in high school who took an xray, said it was IBS, and told me to eat more fiber. Around the same time I was feeling weak all the time and I was having what kinda felt like panic attack symptoms without the actual psychological panic. It kind of felt like a hot flash or too much adrenaline? I just kept telling the doctors that I felt "off". I was also diagnosed with atrial flutter, sinus tach, and asthma for no apparent reason, and I just felt like crap in general some days with no explanation.  I leaned to deal with my stomach problems because everything seemed to come and go. Oddly enough when I went away to college it was a little better for my first year or two. Fast forward to about a year ago, and it started getting more consistent so I went to a new GI. She ordered an ultrasound of my abdomen and from there I actually found out that I had a poorly functioning gallbladder (without stones). I had that taken out in November and have not felt any better since. What's weird is that I never had what I would consider "gallbladder pain", as there really isn't a particular spot that hurts every time. Also I want to add that I am a super levelheaded person, so my doctor telling me it's IBS and to cut stress and see if it helps makes me roll my eyes. This is often how my diarrhea starts off these days: I'll feel bad hot flashes or just "off" and foggy for no reason, then hear the gurgles, get pain, and then diarrhea. Most of the time I feel better after that; sometimes I don't. But I think it's weird that I often feel fluish before my stomach even starts hurting.  Basically I just have all these weird vague symptoms that don't seem related and have been coming and going since at least high school. My current GI doc ordered IGA and IGG tests last summer which came back negative. She also did a colonoscopy a few weeks ago and that was negative too. Now she wants to do a small bowel xray with barium.  Here are my main symptoms: diarrhea 2-6 x a day (it ranges from just loose stools to full-on watery)  severe bloating to the point I look pregnant weird hot flashes that seem correlated to my stomach problems headaches had my gallbladder taken out even though I'm 22 and normal weight short stature (4' 10") nausea bad eczema   Does this really seem like IBS or could my blood results be wrong? My doctor seems to think she's thoroughly tested me for celiac. Would the small intestine xray show any of that? Thanks in advance!!!    
    • Diagnosis and Test Results
      I have been struggling with  symptoms for over a year and had lots of other testing done by my GI.  She did the celiac disease blood test a few weeks ago.  It came back positive for the two genetic markers but my antibodies were negative.  I received the results by phone from the (stupid) nurse who only relayed to me that "your tests showed that you are positive for Celiacs Disease.  you need to go on a gluten free diet and follow up in a few months".  I was so surprised by what she said it didn't even occur to me to call the doctor directly so I took it upon myself to research the disease and going on a strict  gluten free diet.  The first two weeks were horrible!  EVERYTHING I ate gave me diarrhea.  After two weeks, I started to feel better but anytime I inadvertently ate gluten by accident or was cross contaminated, I had horrible diarrhea again.  I spoke with my GI doctor today (I work at the hospital where she works) and she explained the blood results better to me.  (I still haven't expressed my anger about the nurse to her yet...but I will!) It doesn't make sense to me that I have the gene, have been experiencing IMO full blown symptoms (significant weight loss, malnourished, diarrhea, migraines, increased depression/anxiety, etc) but my antibody test was negative.  Could it be lab error?  I asked about an endoscopy and she said we could do it but it still may not confirm the disease.  I've also researched IBS and I don't seem to match up with those symptoms. Part of me wants to know if I have a gluten intolerance or the actual disease.  Either way I'll continue to follow the gluten-free diet but I think it's important to know if I have an autoimmune disease correct?  Or does it? Just looking for some guidance...
    • healthy bread recipe?
      Absolutely, absolutely, absolutely!!!!!!! Your doctor seems to think all her villi have to be completely wiped out for her to be celiac. Like cyclinglady says.... get the records & get a second opinion. BTW, I happen to agree with all the rest she said too but I just wanted to emphasize the second opinion part.  
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

    • celiac sharon  »  cyclinglady

      Hello cycling lady, have you noticed my picture is showing up as you?  Have no idea why but it's rather disconcerting to see my picture and your words 😉  Do you know how to fix it?  You seem to have far more experience with this board than I do
      · 1 reply
    • Larry Gessner  »  cyclinglady

      Hi There, I don't know if there is a place for videos in the forum. I just watched "The Truth About Gluten" I think it is a good video. I would like to share it somewhere but don't know where it should go. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
      Here is the link if you have never watched it.
      https://youtu.be/IU6jVEwpjnE Thank You,
      Larry
      · 2 replies
    • ChiaChick  »  Peaceflower

      Hi Peaceflower, Just wanted to say thank you for the chat.
      · 0 replies
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      60,725
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    bitsunderground
    Joined