Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Crohns Vs. Celiac
0

24 posts in this topic

I have this friend that is always I mean always in and out of the bathroom, with what she has been diagnosed with as Croons. But when my symptoms got the worst she asked me if I had been tested for Croons. I would like to talk to her about going on a gluten-free Diet herself. Mainly because along with the Croons issues, she has mood disorders, thyroid issues among others.

I would just like to get a few websites on the benefits on the gluten-free diet with Croons. I dont think she has Celiac, but on the other hand I think that she could benefit from the diet to help with the symptoms of the Croons.

Any suggestions?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Good for you for trying to help your friend. :)

The Crohn's Forum is a good site for info. Some people with Crohn's do feel better on a gluten-free diet. Others don't report feeling any better at all. So it is not a sure thing that it will help her. It seems there is no way to tell if it will help except to try the the gluten-free diet though. There are people with Crohn's on that forum who are trying the gluten-free diet now, so she might want to join (it's free) and check with them. They are real nice people too. There is plenty of good info on gluten-free right here if she needs it also..

They also have threads on other things like psyillium husks, helpful drugs and some natural herbs etc. So if she isn't on the Crohn's forum now she is missing out on lots of info from fellow Crohnies that might help her. One of the big topics is how to get into remission and that is good stuff for her to read also. The site also ah info on the various surgery options. It is really a gret site for Crohn's info.

Crohn's forum

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since my doctor routinely checks people with celiac disease for Crohn's (and he did for me, since it is in my family) he seems to think they are related.

Do people with Crohn's also have Celiac? Yes!

She has another AI disease already (thyroid), so she may want to ask for a Celiac test from her GI doctor.

Otherwise, whether your friend will benefit from a gluten-free diet or not--well, she can try it and see!

I see Gee Eff in Dee Cee has already referred you to the site.

You're a good friend to help her feel better!

Here are a few articles you might find interesting:

http://www.celiac.com/articles/915/1/Celiac-Disease-Prevalence-High-in-Patients-with-Crohns-Disease/Page1.html

http://www.celiac.com/articles/22440/1/Study-Shows-Celiac-Crohns-Disease-Share-Genetic-Links/Page1.html

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have this friend that is always I mean always in and out of the bathroom, with what she has been diagnosed with as Croons. But when my symptoms got the worst she asked me if I had been tested for Croons. I would like to talk to her about going on a gluten-free Diet herself. Mainly because along with the Croons issues, she has mood disorders, thyroid issues among others.

I would just like to get a few websites on the benefits on the gluten-free diet with Croons. I dont think she has Celiac, but on the other hand I think that she could benefit from the diet to help with the symptoms of the Croons.

Any suggestions?

EDITED TO FIX LINK!

Your friend might look into the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, you can read up on it at Breaking the Vicious Cycle. It is not only gluten-free, but grain-free and starch-free.

This is a diet created especially for people with Crohn's, ulcerative colitis, and other intestinal maladies. My daughter-in-law went on it after a long struggle with c. diff, and she has been thriving on it. The "legal" foods are based on their molecular structure, only simple carbohydrates are allowed. It probably compares well to the "paleo" diet that is becoming very popular.

Another similar diet is GAPS, ("gut and psychology syndrome").

There are folks here using both diets; you might find some of their posts by using the forum "search" tool and searching for "GAPS" or "SCD" or "specific carbohydrate".

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your friend might look into the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, you can read up on it at Breaking the Vicious Cycle. It is not only gluten-free, but grain-free and starch-free.

This link does not work. Can you try another? Thanks, Beachbirdie!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




This link does not work. Can you try another? Thanks, Beachbirdie!

OOPS! Got it fixed, sorry about that!

Thanks for pointing out the problem! :blink:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My sister has Crohn's. Hers won't go into remission, so she has to get IV therapy to keep her immune system knocked down. I've told her she should try gluten-free, but she won't do it. She says she can't. I think she tried for just a few days and gave up? I told her she should be tested for Celiac, but she won't do that either. :blink:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I talked to her, I went about it softly, she asked how the diet was going, and if my symptoms had cleared up I said for the most part. She was like so do you think its a possibility that you have Crohn's. I said I havent ruled it out but there is studies that have been done about the relation between Celiac and Crohn's. That some people with Crohn's are seeing improvement in their health by going on the diet, and that she might want to atleast talk to her doctor about going on the diet. She cant even go to her sons soccer games because there is no real bathroom for her to use. If that were me I would draw the line there and do what ever it took to clear things up. She said she would talk to her Dx and see what she thought.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a cousin with Crohn's and while I haven't talked with her about Celiac and gluten-free I have talked with her sister who has gallbladder disease and "other issues". I know the Crohns cousin is not gluten-free. I mentioned there's quite a bit of overlap and my cousin didn't know that.

It seems the crohns community is not very aware of the correlation.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, shoot, ten years ago, before I knew about celiac and gluten, my MIL's caregiver was always complaining about her Crohn's disease, and she was an inveterate pasta consumer, and I said to hubs, I thought people with Crohn's were not supposed to eat pasta???? Don't know how I heard this, but I kept thinking she is eating the wrong diet for her condition :blink: Of course, that was what I was eating too, but then, I didn't have Crohn's :ph34r::rolleyes:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, shoot, ten years ago, before I knew about celiac and gluten, my MIL's caregiver was always complaining about her Crohn's disease, and she was an inveterate pasta consumer, and I said to hubs, I thought people with Crohn's were not supposed to eat pasta???? Don't know how I heard this, but I kept thinking she is eating the wrong diet for her condition :blink: Of course, that was what I was eating too, but then, I didn't have Crohn's :ph34r::rolleyes:

I hear that crohns patients should be on an anti-inflammatory diet - which excludes gluten (and all grains, I think).

I don't see the correlation of Celiac very often.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems to me doctors don't push gluten-free to Crohns' patients because it doesn't help all of them. They suggest a low residue diet instead, white bread? Seems daffy to me as a celiac but lots of Crohns patients are told diet has no relation. And it doesn't help them all, it is not like celiac where it is a definite known thing. In fact, celiac is the only autoimmune disease where the trigger is known, ie gluten.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My cousin with Crohn's (and RA and thyroid disease) read the info I sent to my large family. They ALL have major gastro issues,(try finding a GB left among us! lactose intolerance, "IBS", GERD, colitis, diverticulitis, etc. ) various AI diseases (MS, diabetes, asthma, RA, Thyroid) and neuro/psych issues. My rather graphic description of my 3- year decline was sent to try and get them to see how gluten could be their problem, too? (to no avail) :rolleyes:

BTW, Do any of us think it's a coincidence that we have Celiac and the rest of our family members have Crohn's or other AI diseases?

Nope.

After reading all I wrote, she said to my Mom:

"That sounds exactly like me! I should be gluten free."

She has not done it as yet, I do not think--but her Crohn's has progressed so far that she wears a colostomy bag. She was only in her 40's when that happened. :(

I think if I were in the situation, I would at least TRY the diet and see if I felt better. What's the big deal?

Why are people so reluctant to try something that may help them feel better and stop living in the bathroom?

Hubs says: They weren't as sick as you. They have to be pushed to near death to take that step.

Maybe so.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
IrishHeart "Hubs says: They weren't as sick as you. They have to be pushed to near death to take that step."

Thats about where I am, when I was 16 I felt as though I was going to die. I had my gallbladder removed, I had acid reflux, I couldn't hold anything down, and wasn't responding to any medication what so ever. They could give me a shot of a medication then take a blood sample less than 24 hours later to test for the medication to find that I didn't have it in my system any longer. My mother was starting to talk about moving so where that I could get a precription for marijuana in the hopes it would help me eat, I had lost 60 lbs in one year. When I started getting sick again I freaked and was willing to do anything to keep from getting that bad again.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My cousin with Crohn's (and RA and thyroid disease) read the info I sent to my large family. They ALL have major gastro issues,(try finding a GB left among us! lactose intolerance, "IBS", GERD, colitis, diverticulitis, etc. ) various AI diseases (MS, diabetes, asthma, RA, Thyroid) and neuro/psych issues. My rather graphic description of my 3- year decline was sent to try and get them to see how gluten could be their problem, too? (to no avail) :rolleyes:

BTW, Do any of us think it's a coincidence that we have Celiac and the rest of our family members have Crohn's or other AI diseases?

Nope.

After reading all I wrote, she said to my Mom:

"That sounds exactly like me! I should be gluten free."

She has not done it as yet, I do not think--but her Crohn's has progressed so far that she wears a colostomy bag. She was only in her 40's when that happened. :(

I think if I were in the situation, I would at least TRY the diet and see if I felt better. What's the big deal?

Why are people so reluctant to try something that may help them feel better and stop living in the bathroom?

Hubs says: They weren't as sick as you. They have to be pushed to near death to take that step.

Maybe so.

DH accomplishes the same thing. Although, there were a few days I wondered how life was gonna work out, pre DH...with the belly aches, etc.

Yeah. All-over blisters make you reevaluate the importance of a baguette.

I agree. They just aren't sick enough yet (from their perspective).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a big reason for the low residue diet is that many have such extreme swelling in the large intestine that passage of stool is difficult. That can lead to the need for surgery. If you reduce the residue,...poo..., you can buy a lot of time where hopefully you will go into remission where the swelling will reduce.

Crohns used to be thought of as an autoimmune disease, but the current research shows it to be a weakened immune system. The body tries to adapt and goes wonky. It is definitely interesting to say the least.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a big reason for the low residue diet is that many have such extreme swelling in the large intestine that passage of stool is difficult. That can lead to the need for surgery. If you reduce the residue,...poo..., you can buy a lot of time where hopefully you will go into remission where the swelling will reduce.

Crohns used to be thought of as an autoimmune disease, but the current research shows it to be a weakened immune system. The body tries to adapt and goes wonky. It is definitely interesting to say the least.

So where does that leave someone with both crohns and Celiac? Because they say there's significant overlap.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think they still categorize it as an AI disease, at least the NIH and the AARDA does.

"The exact cause of Crohn's disease is unknown. It is an autoimmune disorder, which is a condition that occurs when your body's immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys healthy body tissue.

People with Crohn's disease have ongoing (chronic) inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract.

Severe inflammation and obstruction of various parts of the gastrointestinal tract due to swelling and scar formation can cause other problems like bowel perforation, abdominal distension (swelling), severe pain, and fever. This can be life-threatening.

Also, because Crohn's disease is an autoimmune disease, other parts of the body can become inflamed including the joints, eyes, mouth, and skin. In addition, gallstones, and kidney stones may also develop as a result of Crohn's disease.

Moreover, children with the disease may experience decreased growth or delayed sexual development."

Crohn's kind of walks and talks a bit like Celiac, doesn't it? :unsure:

My cousin suffered terribly from it. She was always in the hospital, having more and more of her colon removed.

In any case, if putting down the bagel helps, why not try it?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is the interesting thing. The current research articles say deficiency but the treatment focuses on reducing the immune response. Some researchers are focusing on immune activators while others want to reduce it. I think overall, it is still labelled an AI but in that weird stage between the two where no one is completely sure anymore.

And yes, the overlap is incredible. The differences between the two and what is happening are very similar. Crohns seems to be the body attacking bacteria, celiac hitting gluten. Ours causes issues but theirs causing destruction requiring surgery at times. Why the difference? Seems we got a bit lucky.

Oddly, nicotine helps ulcerative colitis but smoking triggers crohns. they both respond similarly to medications, so some docs are using nicotine suppositories with good success so far.

It would all be fascinating if not so devastating.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is the interesting thing. The current research articles say deficiency but the treatment focuses on reducing the immune response. Some researchers are focusing on immune activators while others want to reduce it. I think overall, it is still labelled an AI but in that weird stage between the two where no one is completely sure anymore.

And yes, the overlap is incredible. The differences between the two and what is happening are very similar. Crohns seems to be the body attacking bacteria, celiac hitting gluten. Ours causes issues but theirs causing destruction requiring surgery at times. Why the difference? Seems we got a bit lucky.

Oddly, nicotine helps ulcerative colitis but smoking triggers crohns. they both respond similarly to medications, so some docs are using nicotine suppositories with good success so far.

It would all be fascinating if not so devastating.

Exactly.

The fascinating if not devastating part.

I wonder if Crohn's is sometimes "the next step" after ai (Celiac). When the body tires of attacking itself it moves on...

Because if Crohns isn't truly ai and is an under active immune system, and Celiac is ai...those people with both are both over performing and under performing at the same time???

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation says it's an autoimmune disease.

Autoimmune means a condition that occurs when your body's immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys healthy body tissue.

Under their section: Why Do We Need More Research?

Although we have made very significant advances

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation says it's an autoimmune disease.

Autoimmune means a condition that occurs when your body's immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys healthy body tissue.

Under their section: Why Do We Need More Research?

Although we have made very significant advances

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My boyfriend has a really bad case of crohns and could not get his symptoms under control after a bowel resection and strong meds. He met me, went dairy and gluten free when I did (ironically I always avoided wheat in general because I didn't like it, then ate it all the time when he was the chef and I got insanely sick!). He now has no symptoms, no meds. He was never checked for celiac or lactose intolerance. I wouldn't expect the dietary changes to work for everyone, but hey, why the heck not try it out? :) Or at the very least get the blood test. Boy is he glad he met me!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My boyfriend has a really bad case of crohns and could not get his symptoms under control after a bowel resection and strong meds. He met me, went dairy and gluten free when I did (ironically I always avoided wheat in general because I didn't like it, then ate it all the time when he was the chef and I got insanely sick!). He now has no symptoms, no meds. He was never checked for celiac or lactose intolerance. I wouldn't expect the dietary changes to work for everyone, but hey, why the heck not try it out? :) Or at the very least get the blood test. Boy is he glad he met me!

I bet he is...

I have had several conversations with her about the diet, she is interested. although she is not interested enough to try the diet. She had crohns surgery 10 years ago, and from what she says its in remission. I dont quite believe its in complete remission, she still has to run to the bathroom soon after eating, and has plenty of problems with just about anything she eats.

She is learning, and I think she might try it eventually... Maybe

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,375
    • Total Posts
      920,572
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • https://www.facebook.com/groups/SingaporeCeliacs/
    • Today was the big day when I went to the GI and this is the first time I have felt heard and taken care of.  I told him about the two celiac blood tests  (in my first post) normal, he said that often happens, even with people who do have celiac and he needed to see the report and pictures from my endoscope.    I had filled out the appropriate Kaiser paperwork for Sutter to send all my medical records, but they ended up sending a disc with records to me, which Sutter said they could not use.  We also talked about gluten sensitivity v. celiac, and he said a lot of people are sensitive to gluten even if they don't have celiac. He said that my symptoms sound like classic IBS, which can be caused by any number of things.  He asked if I would try the FODMAP diet, which limits certain foods and requires no gluten. He said my symptoms sound like classic IBS, which he said can be caused by any number of things, including gluten sensitivity.  He has asked if I would try the FODMAP diet, which has restricted foods as well as no gluten because most gluten products have wheat in them.  So, since I am planning on going gluten free anyway, and I don't want another endoscope or blood tests if absolutely necessary, I am going to try the FODMAP diet and see what happens. I filled a consent form at the GI office today to have all my records sent to him so he can view the endoscope pathology report and photos.  I have an appointment with a Registered Dietician on September 30, and follow up appointment the GI in 4 months. 
    • gluten-free andee, according to an article on celiac.com  that talks about this subject see this link http://www.celiac.com/articles/24406/1/Celiac-Diease-and-Other-Autoimmune-Diseases-Equals-Low-Inflammatory-Diet/Page1.html Quoting the author "In the author's personal experience, a gluten-free diet has many limitations. The reactivity between alpha gliadin and corn, millet, oats, rice and dairy has been denounced as invalid by gastroenterologists and celiac disease researchers. While at a medical school in Missouri, biopsies did not show improvement in villous atropy until all alpha gliadin sources and corn, millet, rice and oats were removed from the diet."  Note this research is two years old but hilites the problem with non-gluten rice protein that you are having. It is the alpha gliadin sources that it causing the cross reactivity you are experiencing when you eat rice protein's. She says quoting "Celiac disease has gotten the most attention in antibody research, but the current data on cross-reactivity of antibodies is allowing a better understanding of gluten sensitivity. Antigen reactivity to alpha-gliadin can trigger immune attacks on many individuals beyond those with positive DQ 2, DQ 8 and TTG test results. She goes on to say "A low inflammatory diet customized to each person through testing for cross-reactivity or elimination diet protocols is needed to restore a state of health and well-being."  which sounds exactly like what you are doing. If you are still having problems after elminating rice a 30 day elimination of all the alpha gliadin proteins might be in order.  Corn is a common reactivity problem I hear with a gluten allergy from my friends as well as the obvious lactose problems that can be common among celiacs.  But rarely do you hear Rice allergy's brought up in context of a gluten allergy. I am glad you are making progress on finding your triggers. Read the whole article for yourself to see if there are nuggets of truth I did not highlight in my response. I hope this is helpful. Good luck on your journey to health. Posterboy,
    • One other thing - you might be able to tolerate some dairy if it's only the FODMAPs problem. I discovered that many cheese such as cheddar have effectively no lactose. And my wife sometimes makes 24 hour yoghurt, which also has effectively no lactose. Those have been fine for my tummy.
    • Celiacs got better gluten-free. Post-war, grains became available again and the same patients got sick again. 1952 the Gluten-Free Diet is officially ... View the full article
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,451
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    Chelsealarita
    Joined