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Does "milk Fat" Always Mean Casein?
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What does "milk fat" indicate, exactly? Does it always contain casein/whey? Sorry if this is a stupid question, I'm just hopeful that there is some chance milk fat does not contain casein and whey.

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What does "milk fat" indicate, exactly? Does it always contain casein/whey? Sorry if this is a stupid question, I'm just hopeful that there is some chance milk fat does not contain casein and whey.

On a quick search I couldn't find a definitive answer. Whey and casein are two separate protein components of milk; lactose is the sugar component of milk, and milk fat is the "fat" in the milk. When cream is churned for butter, or when cheese is made, the fat is agglomerated (the globules are made to adhere to each other) and the whey and lactose are forced out as byproduct. I am not sure what happens to the casein in this process. Alternatively, when milk is dried to a powder it is usually converted to a casein powder, but there is also whey powder made as in the powder for protein drinks. Coming from New Zealand as I do, I guess I should know more about milk since it is one of our biggest export products :( I did not have time to read this whole article: http://www.foodsci.u...ryedu/chem.html but you might find the info in there. Butter is almost exclusively fat and the 'harder' the cheese the higher the fat content. This is why some people who are lactose intolerant can eat butter and cheese - there is very little lactose left in them - the butter because it has been churned out and the cheese because it has all been digested by enzymes. But how much whey or casein? I don't know.

Sorry I couldn't answer that. See, it was not at all a stupid question. Hopefully someone else will have an answer for you. :)

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Wow, actually that is EXTREMELY helpful. I will check out the article. THANK YOU!

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Wow, actually that is EXTREMELY helpful. I will check out the article. THANK YOU!

If you find the answer, let me know :D

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