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Help With Possible Dairy Intolerance
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After many months of narrowing it down, i think i have dairy issues. Seems like i'm fine if i eat say gluten free bread that has milk in it, but if i were to have ice cream, or lots of cheese i am not.

I have read that you can't test for dairy issues.....does anyone else experience this?

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Thats the way I am. I believe I am lactose intolerant. I can't have raw milk at all. Ice Cream I do eat, but I feel awful for hours later on. I can handle cheese in small amounts, yogurt and things that milk is in (baked goods)...but basically I try to only eat a small amount of these things.

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<br />Thats the way I am.
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So Delicious Coconut milk, creamer, ice cream and yogurt.

High calcium and tastes great!

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The enzyme that breaks down the lactose in dairy products is made on the tips of the villi. If you have any villi damage, lactose will give you trouble.

Some people take a supplement that helps break it down if they feel the need to continue eating it.

Yogurt and some cheeeses have the lactose processed out when they are made, so you could still eat them. If those bother you, you may have a problem with casein..the protein in milk?

If you take away whichever dairy bothers you, you may be able to enjoy it again once you've healed.

I ditto IrishHeart on the SoDelicious coconut milk. I get the vanila flavored milk for my cereal..it's yummy!

For a butter substitute I use Earth Balance soy free spread.

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<br />The enzyme that breaks down the lactose in dairy products is made on the tips of the villi. If you have any villi damage, lactose will give you trouble.<br />Some people take a supplement that helps break it down if they feel the need to continue eating it.<br /><br />Yogurt and some cheeeses have the lactose processed out when they are made, so you could still eat them. If those bother you, you may have a problem with casein..the protein in milk? <br /><br />If you take away whichever dairy bothers you, you may be able to enjoy it again once you've healed.<br /><br />I ditto IrishHeart on the SoDelicious coconut milk. I get the vanila flavored milk for my cereal..it's yummy!<br />For a butter substitute I use Earth Balance soy free spread.<br />
<br /><br /><br />

can you cook with that butter like regular butter? is there a better choice for cooking?

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<br /><br /><br />

can you cook with that butter like regular butter? is there a better choice for cooking?

Yes, like Bubba's Mom (or BM as I have called her for short on threads, but she probably does not like that :lol: )---

I use the Earth Balance Soy free too.

You can cook with it and use it in baking, too.

Works great. It's a blend of healthy omega oils.

It's not my favorite flavor, to be honest, but until I could tolerate dairy, it was very helpful! :)

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Aged cheeses do not have lactose, the aging process loses the lactose (sugar), say is true for your good yogurts that are all sugar. If cheddar cheese is bothering you I would say it was lactose. If age cheese like parmesian (actual brick) is bothering you I would say it is casein (protein). There's other things in ice cream besides lactose they could be bothering you as well like beans such as guar or bean gum, I cannot eat them. If you cannot eat butter I do not suggest anything that can sit in the fridg and never grow mold as there is too many chemicals. Switch to a nut spread. If you are baking use shortening or oil instead when you can, margarine is really not a healthy food. If you want to try milk that is lactose free be very aware that other ingredients are put in almond, soy, coconut milk....things like carrageenan and the gums. The lactose enzymes do work. I was on them for a year, doing much better now.....still cannot drink the lactose free milk because of the gums. Read labels and let your body tell you the rest.

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<br /><br /><br />

can you cook with that butter like regular butter? is there a better choice for cooking?

I haven't tried baking with the Earth Balance. I use it on baked potatoes, veggies, stuff like that.

For baking, or gluten-free Krispy Treats I use coconut oil. The good kind..like Nutiva(organic, pure) It has a lot of health benefits, so I use it quite a bit instead of butter,and for browing meats, etc.

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I used it the EB in baked goods, bread, muffins, etc. It worked fine.

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can you cook with that butter like regular butter? is there a better choice for cooking?

I asked this question recently on a food intolerance message board I'm on. Almost everybody who is dairy-sensitive, even people who are extremely sensitive, can tolerate ghee. It has a rich butter flavor and it's great for sauteeing. You can find it at Indian food stores or make your own from unsalted butter.

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I asked this question recently on a food intolerance message board I'm on. Almost everybody who is dairy-sensitive, even people who are extremely sensitive, can tolerate ghee. It has a rich butter flavor and it's great for sauteeing. You can find it at Indian food stores or make your own from unsalted butter.

I used ghee, too without issues. :)

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I asked this question recently on a food intolerance message board I'm on. Almost everybody who is dairy-sensitive, even people who are extremely sensitive, can tolerate ghee. It has a rich butter flavor and it's great for sauteeing. You can find it at Indian food stores or make your own from unsalted butter.

Ghee is great!

Only caveat is that if you are trying to avoid inflammatory foods, ghee is out because it's an animal fat. But if lactose/casein is your concern then ghee away. I love it.

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Ghee is great!

Only caveat is that if you are trying to avoid inflammatory foods, ghee is out because it's an animal fat. But if lactose/casein is your concern then ghee away. I love it.

I've seen info that the butyric acid and other short-chain fatty acids found in butter and ghee are anti-inflammatory. :) I don't think ghee would be included in the animal fat/inflammation link. It's just good stuff all around!

The long-chain saturated fatty acids, especially stearic acid in grain-fed beef, are definitely an issue for inflammation.

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<br />Ghee is great!<br /><br />Only caveat is that if you are trying to avoid inflammatory foods, ghee is out because it's an animal fat. But if lactose/casein is your concern then ghee away. I love it.<br />
<br /><br /><br />

I am still pretty new to figuring out the dairy intolerance, i will still need to narrow it down as to whether it's lactose or casin, i am pretty sure it's lactose, but not 100%. I am off on vacation next week and on a cruise, so i am not going to go crazy over this til i get back.

i really appreciate all the help. I am going to go dairy free the minute i get home from vacation and see if it helps!

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I've seen info that the butyric acid and other short-chain fatty acids found in butter and ghee are anti-inflammatory. :) I don't think ghee would be included in the animal fat/inflammation link. It's just good stuff all around!

Yes, I used ghee with the understanding that it is an ANTI-INFLAMMATORY.

"Ayurveda medicine has traditionally used ghee in place of butter for its various healing benefits, according to Yoga Journal online. One benefit of incorporating ghee into the diet is its anti-inflammatory properties. Ghee is thought to naturally lubricate connective tissues in the body, which can help to improve flexibility and provide the body with essential antioxidants. This effect is especially helpful for healing, as the formula can enhance the immune system to reduce inflammation, speed the recovery of wounds and heal blisters"

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I've seen info that the butyric acid and other short-chain fatty acids found in butter and ghee are anti-inflammatory. :) I don't think ghee would be included in the animal fat/inflammation link. It's just good stuff all around!

The long-chain saturated fatty acids, especially stearic acid in grain-fed beef, are definitely an issue for inflammation.

I'll try to find the link to where I found it...but I swear you hear 20 things all different.

I turned down a share in a milk cow because I'm trying to cut dairy. I wouldn't drink the milk, but I'd sure make ghee and yogurt and butter. And ice cream and cheese...

I think grass-fed milk is better for you than even grain fed organics (at least that's what "they" say)....

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No need to dig up links. I've read 20 things all different too. :lol: It's looking up butyric acid on Pubmed and seeing good things that convinced me ghee/butterfat is a good fat (in moderation of course). I also think there is a lot of wisdom accumulated in the 5,000 years of ayurveda and they hold ghee in very high regard for its healing properties.

I've also read the same thing you have that grass-fed > grain-fed organic > conventional as far as vitamin K2 and and omega-3 fatty acids. The tradeoff of course, is that there can be more pesticide residue in the non-organic, grass-fed milk.

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No need to dig up links. I've read 20 things all different too. :lol: It's looking up butyric acid on Pubmed and seeing good things that convinced me ghee/butterfat is a good fat (in moderation of course). I also think there is a lot of wisdom accumulated in the 5,000 years of ayurveda and they hold ghee in very high regard for its healing properties.

I've also read the same thing you have that grass-fed > grain-fed organic > conventional as far as vitamin K2 and and omega-3 fatty acids. The tradeoff of course, is that there can be more pesticide residue in the non-organic, grass-fed milk.

Problem is I'm in AZ and grass fed is uh, not likely. I can get raw milk from a farmer (and she's babied beyond belief-one happy Jersey) and she has a pasture, etc but grass is just not here.

Sigh.

Oh well, it's good to know ghee is a "go"! Thanks!!

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I don't know where you read that you can't test for dairy intolerances. You can. I have been tested. I am intolerant.

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There is, indeed, a lactose intolerance test.

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