Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Help With Possible Dairy Intolerance


  • Please log in to reply

20 replies to this topic

#1 kaki_clam

 
kaki_clam

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 124 posts
 

Posted 24 April 2012 - 04:33 AM

After many months of narrowing it down, i think i have dairy issues. Seems like i'm fine if i eat say gluten free bread that has milk in it, but if i were to have ice cream, or lots of cheese i am not.

I have read that you can't test for dairy issues.....does anyone else experience this?
  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 Metoo

 
Metoo

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 223 posts
 

Posted 24 April 2012 - 04:59 AM

Thats the way I am. I believe I am lactose intolerant. I can't have raw milk at all. Ice Cream I do eat, but I feel awful for hours later on. I can handle cheese in small amounts, yogurt and things that milk is in (baked goods)...but basically I try to only eat a small amount of these things.
  • 0

#3 kaki_clam

 
kaki_clam

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 124 posts
 

Posted 24 April 2012 - 05:02 AM

<br />Thats the way I am.I believe I am lactose intolerant.I can't have raw milk at all.Ice Cream I do eat, but I feel awful for hours later on.I can handle cheese in small amounts, yogurt and things that milk is in (baked goods)...but basically I try to only eat a small amount of these things.<br />

<br /><br /><br />

when you eat small amounts you seem fine, but over load, not so much, i think that is what is happening with me. I am going to try to cut out all obvious dairy for a bit and see what happens. Do you have problems with milk soilds found in non diary foods? also, do you use a dairy free "milk' and can you recommend a good brand for a beginner to try?
  • 0

#4 IrishHeart

 
IrishHeart

    Warrior Princess

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,550 posts
 

Posted 24 April 2012 - 05:38 AM

So Delicious Coconut milk, creamer, ice cream and yogurt.

High calcium and tastes great!
  • 0

"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#5 Bubba's Mom

 
Bubba's Mom

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,457 posts
 

Posted 24 April 2012 - 05:55 AM

The enzyme that breaks down the lactose in dairy products is made on the tips of the villi. If you have any villi damage, lactose will give you trouble.
Some people take a supplement that helps break it down if they feel the need to continue eating it.

Yogurt and some cheeeses have the lactose processed out when they are made, so you could still eat them. If those bother you, you may have a problem with casein..the protein in milk?

If you take away whichever dairy bothers you, you may be able to enjoy it again once you've healed.

I ditto IrishHeart on the SoDelicious coconut milk. I get the vanila flavored milk for my cereal..it's yummy!
For a butter substitute I use Earth Balance soy free spread.
  • 0

#6 kaki_clam

 
kaki_clam

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 124 posts
 

Posted 24 April 2012 - 06:07 AM

<br />The enzyme that breaks down the lactose in dairy products is made on the tips of the villi. If you have any villi damage, lactose will give you trouble.<br />Some people take a supplement that helps break it down if they feel the need to continue eating it.<br /><br />Yogurt and some cheeeses have the lactose processed out when they are made, so you could still eat them. If those bother you, you may have a problem with casein..the protein in milk? <br /><br />If you take away whichever dairy bothers you, you may be able to enjoy it again once you've healed.<br /><br />I ditto IrishHeart on the SoDelicious coconut milk. I get the vanila flavored milk for my cereal..it's yummy!<br />For a butter substitute I use Earth Balance soy free spread.<br />

<br /><br /><br />

can you cook with that butter like regular butter? is there a better choice for cooking?
  • 0

#7 IrishHeart

 
IrishHeart

    Warrior Princess

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,550 posts
 

Posted 24 April 2012 - 06:21 AM

<br /><br /><br />

can you cook with that butter like regular butter? is there a better choice for cooking?


Yes, like Bubba's Mom (or BM as I have called her for short on threads, but she probably does not like that :lol: )---

I use the Earth Balance Soy free too.

You can cook with it and use it in baking, too.

Works great. It's a blend of healthy omega oils.

It's not my favorite flavor, to be honest, but until I could tolerate dairy, it was very helpful! :)
  • 0

"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#8 AVR1962

 
AVR1962

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,107 posts
 

Posted 24 April 2012 - 07:21 AM

Aged cheeses do not have lactose, the aging process loses the lactose (sugar), say is true for your good yogurts that are all sugar. If cheddar cheese is bothering you I would say it was lactose. If age cheese like parmesian (actual brick) is bothering you I would say it is casein (protein). There's other things in ice cream besides lactose they could be bothering you as well like beans such as guar or bean gum, I cannot eat them. If you cannot eat butter I do not suggest anything that can sit in the fridg and never grow mold as there is too many chemicals. Switch to a nut spread. If you are baking use shortening or oil instead when you can, margarine is really not a healthy food. If you want to try milk that is lactose free be very aware that other ingredients are put in almond, soy, coconut milk....things like carrageenan and the gums. The lactose enzymes do work. I was on them for a year, doing much better now.....still cannot drink the lactose free milk because of the gums. Read labels and let your body tell you the rest.
  • 0
Yesterday is not ours to recover but today is ours to win or lose!

Miscarriage, Kidney stones, Anemia, Pneumonia, Migraines, Restless leg, Bone fractures, Blurred/Double vision, Extreme fatigue, Bone & Joint Pain, Thyroid nodule, Celiac diagnosed 2011, Spine and leg bone loss, GERD, Vitamin deficiencies, Malabsorbtion, Neuropathy issues, Ataxia, Raynaud's Syndrome. Currently on diet with limited grain and sugar.

#9 Bubba's Mom

 
Bubba's Mom

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,457 posts
 

Posted 24 April 2012 - 07:58 AM

<br /><br /><br />

can you cook with that butter like regular butter? is there a better choice for cooking?

I haven't tried baking with the Earth Balance. I use it on baked potatoes, veggies, stuff like that.

For baking, or gluten-free Krispy Treats I use coconut oil. The good kind..like Nutiva(organic, pure) It has a lot of health benefits, so I use it quite a bit instead of butter,and for browing meats, etc.
  • 0

#10 IrishHeart

 
IrishHeart

    Warrior Princess

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,550 posts
 

Posted 24 April 2012 - 07:59 AM

I used it the EB in baked goods, bread, muffins, etc. It worked fine.
  • 0

"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#11 Skylark

 
Skylark

    Glutenologist

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,490 posts
 

Posted 24 April 2012 - 11:13 AM

can you cook with that butter like regular butter? is there a better choice for cooking?

I asked this question recently on a food intolerance message board I'm on. Almost everybody who is dairy-sensitive, even people who are extremely sensitive, can tolerate ghee. It has a rich butter flavor and it's great for sauteeing. You can find it at Indian food stores or make your own from unsalted butter.
  • 0

#12 IrishHeart

 
IrishHeart

    Warrior Princess

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,550 posts
 

Posted 24 April 2012 - 11:23 AM

I asked this question recently on a food intolerance message board I'm on. Almost everybody who is dairy-sensitive, even people who are extremely sensitive, can tolerate ghee. It has a rich butter flavor and it's great for sauteeing. You can find it at Indian food stores or make your own from unsalted butter.


I used ghee, too without issues. :)
  • 0

"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#13 pricklypear1971

 
pricklypear1971

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,684 posts
 

Posted 24 April 2012 - 11:30 AM

I asked this question recently on a food intolerance message board I'm on. Almost everybody who is dairy-sensitive, even people who are extremely sensitive, can tolerate ghee. It has a rich butter flavor and it's great for sauteeing. You can find it at Indian food stores or make your own from unsalted butter.


Ghee is great!

Only caveat is that if you are trying to avoid inflammatory foods, ghee is out because it's an animal fat. But if lactose/casein is your concern then ghee away. I love it.
  • 0
Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#14 Skylark

 
Skylark

    Glutenologist

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,490 posts
 

Posted 24 April 2012 - 11:49 AM

Ghee is great!

Only caveat is that if you are trying to avoid inflammatory foods, ghee is out because it's an animal fat. But if lactose/casein is your concern then ghee away. I love it.

I've seen info that the butyric acid and other short-chain fatty acids found in butter and ghee are anti-inflammatory. :) I don't think ghee would be included in the animal fat/inflammation link. It's just good stuff all around!

The long-chain saturated fatty acids, especially stearic acid in grain-fed beef, are definitely an issue for inflammation.
  • 0

#15 kaki_clam

 
kaki_clam

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 124 posts
 

Posted 24 April 2012 - 12:00 PM

<br />Ghee is great!<br /><br />Only caveat is that if you are trying to avoid inflammatory foods, ghee is out because it's an animal fat. But if lactose/casein is your concern then ghee away. I love it.<br />

<br /><br /><br />

I am still pretty new to figuring out the dairy intolerance, i will still need to narrow it down as to whether it's lactose or casin, i am pretty sure it's lactose, but not 100%. I am off on vacation next week and on a cruise, so i am not going to go crazy over this til i get back.

i really appreciate all the help. I am going to go dairy free the minute i get home from vacation and see if it helps!
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: