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Drywall Repairs


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48 replies to this topic

#1 eatmeat4good

 
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Posted 27 April 2012 - 08:25 PM

They will be doing drywall repairs at my place of work on Monday. I'm scared. I've read that drywall contains gluten. I have been gluten free for one year and six months. It took me 14 months to clear my DH rash. I don't know what to do. My boss told me about the repairs being done on Monday so I could decide what to do. Wear a mask? I've read that doesn't really help unless it is the respirator type. I don't have one and they are expensive. Do I take off work and miss two days of pay that I really need to put food on the table? How long will drywall dust stay in the air? I'm thinking two days off to be safe and then maybe wear a mask for a few days...but I really don't know. I get really sick from gluten. Anyone with experience with this problem? Any advice will be appreciated. I don't want to spend the next 2 to 3 weeks with depression and anxiety and probably many more months with the rash and sores that won't heal.. Please advise.
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Healing is a matter of time, but it is sometimes also a matter of opportunity.
--Hippocrates

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#2 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 27 April 2012 - 08:54 PM

Well, I got into something when they were repairing my house. We weren't living there, but I'd go and work on the house.

Sometimes there's gluten in the joint compound, or the wallboard. You'll never know.

The time it really got me was when I ATE at the house. Yes, I'd washed my hands but it wasn't good enough.

So, for me if I wore pants, wore sleeves if i could,didn't eat there, didn't refill my water bottle...and showered the second I got home and took an antihistimine I got through it.

But in the end, it was THE EATING.

Now the house is semi clean and I'm less sensitive and I'm ok. I still get it itchy but I take an antihistimine and im ok.

Of the dust will be in the air (demolition) I'd stay home. That stuff gets everywhere. If they are installing new, the dust will be minimal. But it will be on surfaces.
  • 0
Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#3 captaincrab55

 
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Posted 28 April 2012 - 02:52 AM

Just wondering, has this type of Topic been covered before??? I work Commercial & Industrial Construction and I'm often exposed to drywall & joint compound dust.. I have DH and had many unexplained itches and feeling bad... Sounds like I need to check the MSDS Sheets for Gluten...
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I'm a New Man Without GLUTEN!

#4 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 28 April 2012 - 03:27 AM

Just wondering, has this type of Topic been covered before??? I work Commercial & Industrial Construction and I'm often exposed to drywall & joint compound dust.. I have DH and had many unexplained itches and feeling bad... Sounds like I need to check the MSDS Sheets for Gluten...


You may find this site by the NIH helpful:

http://householdprod...nds&id=18001046
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#5 Di2011

 
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Posted 28 April 2012 - 04:15 AM

OMG With my DH I'd be out of there, literally. I'm a low income single mum. After 12 months of head to toe DH this is a situation that would need me to be on severe avoidance.. so that I could have minimal impact on my ability to pay future bills.
I hope it works out for you whatever you decide to do. Let us know. All of these experiences and decisions are important for us (and newcomers) to make informed decisions.
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#6 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 28 April 2012 - 04:19 AM

There's an old thread on here, about this. Search for it.

But yes, some building materials have it, others don't. Sometimes it's hard to figure out or get the MSDS, and then if it's an old construction (like my house) you'll never know.
  • 0
Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#7 eatmeat4good

 
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Posted 28 April 2012 - 02:33 PM

Thanks everyone. Yes, this has been covered before. I googled gluten in drywall and came up with many posts about people getting sick from sheetrock/drywall.

I am very low income and can't afford to be off work. BUT the drywall work is really minor repairs of nail holes and such. I think I will wear a mask and go all day without eating. I am really worried. I am the housekeeper so I'm supposed to clean up the sheetrock mess. Ugh! If I don't do it Monday, it will be there on Tuesday so I guess I will just have to face it.

Hey Captain...look at this...http://hartkeisonline.com/natural-health/drywall-guy-solves-his-own-health-issues/

I really don't want to get sores again. I guess I am still thinking it over. As soon as I think about the depression and the sores I could be in for...I decide that taking one day off isn't that big a deal. And Tuesday might be safer. But it took 7 years to find out what caused the sores and 14 months to heal them so I sure as heck don't want a reaction.

Yeah, people should be aware of gluten in drywall/sheetrock. The dust is fine and I'm sure it will last for days.

Has anyone survived this situation without getting sick? Pricklypear, thanks for the advice, I will take those precautions if I go in.

Oh my gosh! I do not know what to do.

I know we have to live in the real world, but really, I can't take it. I feel like I will be walking into a radioactive waste site and not knowing when the radiation sickness will hit...but knowing that it will.

I'm taking Monday off. I can't even stand thinking about it anymore. I haven't been glutened in several months and I am so relieved to finally be well. Muscles are working great...no migraines...no sores...it's just not worth it.
  • 0
Healing is a matter of time, but it is sometimes also a matter of opportunity.
--Hippocrates

#8 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 28 April 2012 - 03:46 PM

Well, quite frankly if they're just patching nail holes that's manageable - or it would be for me. I even patched mail holes in that house without issue.

When I reacted, it was from them literally ripping walls and floors out and there was a sheet of dust EVERYWHERE.

If you wear rubber gloves/particle mask (just a dust mask) and dispose of the cleanup I'd bet you'd be fine - or at least I would.

I would eat OUTSIDE, though, for a few days and wash yourself down well before you eat- face, arms.

It might actually be better if you're there so you can direct the construction workers about what NOT to do. Force them to clean up properly and get ahead of it. You'll know where they go, etc.
  • 0
Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#9 squirmingitch

 
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Posted 28 April 2012 - 04:58 PM

And it might look sort of silly but can you pin your hair up on your head & cover all with a kerchief or some such type of thing? That way none will get it your hair & then cause you grief.
  • 0

Self diagnosed dh Sept. 2011~~~ confirmed dx July 18, 2012
Gluten free Dec. 2011
Soy free Dec. 2011
Hubs self diagnosed dh March 30, 2012
Hubs gluten free March 30, 2012

Summer 2013 We both have added back a little soy which is near unavoidable & we are doing okay with that small amount.

 


#10 scaredblossom

 
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Posted 28 April 2012 - 05:35 PM

I had a question related to this topic, the house we live in has a wheat field right in front of it! Will the harvesting of the wheat bother me and if so is allergy medication enough to keep it at bay???
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#11 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 28 April 2012 - 05:44 PM

I found this one article written by Jane Anderson, who frequently writes about celiac disease.

Question: Can I Get Symptoms from Inhaling Airborne Gluten?

Answer:

There is indeed evidence that it's possible. One medical study backs the idea that it's possible to experience celiac disease symptoms by inhaling gluten, rather than eating it. In addition, there's anecdotal evidence that airborne gluten can cause symptoms.

So while airborne gluten has not been proven to cause problems, if you have celiac disease and continue to have symptoms despite following a gluten-free diet, it would make sense to look for possible airborne sources of gluten in your environment.

The medical report, published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1997, involved two farmers diagnosed with nonresponsive celiac disease (also known as refractory celiac disease).

Each day, the two spent time in an enclosed space, feeding their cattle a mixture of barley, wheat and other grains that contained at least 6% dust particles by weight. The report estimates that the two farmers "were potentially exposed to over 150 g of gluten-containing dust particles per day, which they were inhaling and ingesting."

For reference, that's about 15,000 times the amount of gluten considered "too much" on a daily basis for a person with celiac disease.

Both farmers suffered from ongoing symptoms, including cramps, bloating, fatigue and diarrhea. One of the farmers — the one with the worst symptoms — had total villous atrophy, despite following the gluten-free diet. The other, who also followed a gluten-free diet, showed less severe intestinal damage.

Once both farmers began wearing face masks, their symptoms cleared up. The farmer with the more severe intestinal damage saw improvement in his intestinal lining, and the other farmer had total resolution of the damage.
What Does This Mean for Other Celiacs?

Most of us aren't farmers, nor are we exposed to that much gluten each day, either from gluten in "gluten-free" foods or airborne gluten. However, it shows that airborne gluten can have an effect and cause symptoms.

For non-farmers, there aren't any medical studies that show airborne gluten can be a problem. However, anecdotal evidence suggests you can get glutened from airborne flour, either in a private kitchen or even near an active grocery store bakery. This has happened to me more times than I can count, and it's happened frequently to celiac and gluten-intolerant friends. You don't have to be super-sensitive, either.

Pet food may pose a potential problem, according to the clinicians who wrote the airborne gluten medical report. Most dry pet food contains gluten, and when you pour it out, it's possible to inhale some of it. In addition, some powdered household products, such as drywall compound, contain gluten, and working with these may cause a reaction. I've had bad reactions from drywall dust.

How to Avoid Airborne Gluten

To avoid airborne gluten, you need to know where it occurs. Here are some suggestions, both from my own experience and from other celiac educators:

Never use flour in the kitchen. Don't work with flour; don't let anyone else work with flour in your kitchen; and don't visit with friends and family members in their kitchens while they're working with flour.

Switch to gluten-free pet food. It's theoretically possible for you to avoid the dust if (1) someone else feeds your pet, and (2) you keep the food and the bowl outside. But if you have a close relationship with your pet, you'll be better off switching anyway, since you'll inevitably be exposed.

Avoid places where drywall is being installed. If you need to have work done on your house, have someone else do it and stay away until the work site's been thoroughly cleaned up. Don't use ready-made spackling putty or compound, either, since most are wheat-based.

Exercise caution around store-based bakeries. Some of these seem fine for me, while others get me every time. I think the difference may be in the ventilation systems. If you can smell the bread and cookies baking, you may be risking an airborne reaction.

Consider using a face mask in certain situations. I haven't had great luck with a face mask when I've tried to use it to avoid drywall dust. I still got a reaction — it just took longer. But for short exposures, it might do the trick. I recommend a full respirator, rather than a painter's mask — they're about $40 in home improvement centers. If you have asthma or another respiratory condition that affects your breathing, you should use a respirator with caution and remove it if you have trouble breathing with it on.

Not everyone needs to take all these precautions; if you're not particularly sensitive to gluten cross-contamination, you may be fine in most or all of these situations. But if you find you're still having unexplained symptoms, even though you follow the gluten-free diet very strictly, you might want to check out your environment as well as your food.

Source:

Kasim S. et al. Nonresponsive Celiac Disease Due to Inhaled Gluten. New England Journal of Medicine 2007; 356:2548-2549.
  • 2

"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#12 eatmeat4good

 
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Posted 28 April 2012 - 06:20 PM

Good point Squirming! I have long hair...and wear a braid...but hadn't thought of the dust that will get in my hair. I will put it up and wear a mask and a shower cap! How about that! I guess I won't be flirting with any construction workers Monday! Won't I be cute? hey! Maybe Captaincrab?
  • 0
Healing is a matter of time, but it is sometimes also a matter of opportunity.
--Hippocrates

#13 dws

 
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Posted 28 April 2012 - 06:39 PM

I found this one article written by Jane Anderson, who frequently writes about celiac disease.

Question: Can I Get Symptoms from Inhaling Airborne Gluten?

Answer:

There is indeed evidence that it's possible. One medical study backs the idea that it's possible to experience celiac disease symptoms by inhaling gluten, rather than eating it. In addition, there's anecdotal evidence that airborne gluten can cause symptoms.

So while airborne gluten has not been proven to cause problems, if you have celiac disease and continue to have symptoms despite following a gluten-free diet, it would make sense to look for possible airborne sources of gluten in your environment.

The medical report, published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1997, involved two farmers diagnosed with nonresponsive celiac disease (also known as refractory celiac disease).

Each day, the two spent time in an enclosed space, feeding their cattle a mixture of barley, wheat and other grains that contained at least 6% dust particles by weight. The report estimates that the two farmers "were potentially exposed to over 150 g of gluten-containing dust particles per day, which they were inhaling and ingesting."

For reference, that's about 15,000 times the amount of gluten considered "too much" on a daily basis for a person with celiac disease.

Both farmers suffered from ongoing symptoms, including cramps, bloating, fatigue and diarrhea. One of the farmers — the one with the worst symptoms — had total villous atrophy, despite following the gluten-free diet. The other, who also followed a gluten-free diet, showed less severe intestinal damage.

Once both farmers began wearing face masks, their symptoms cleared up. The farmer with the more severe intestinal damage saw improvement in his intestinal lining, and the other farmer had total resolution of the damage.
What Does This Mean for Other Celiacs?

Most of us aren't farmers, nor are we exposed to that much gluten each day, either from gluten in "gluten-free" foods or airborne gluten. However, it shows that airborne gluten can have an effect and cause symptoms.

For non-farmers, there aren't any medical studies that show airborne gluten can be a problem. However, anecdotal evidence suggests you can get glutened from airborne flour, either in a private kitchen or even near an active grocery store bakery. This has happened to me more times than I can count, and it's happened frequently to celiac and gluten-intolerant friends. You don't have to be super-sensitive, either.

Pet food may pose a potential problem, according to the clinicians who wrote the airborne gluten medical report. Most dry pet food contains gluten, and when you pour it out, it's possible to inhale some of it. In addition, some powdered household products, such as drywall compound, contain gluten, and working with these may cause a reaction. I've had bad reactions from drywall dust.

How to Avoid Airborne Gluten

To avoid airborne gluten, you need to know where it occurs. Here are some suggestions, both from my own experience and from other celiac educators:

Never use flour in the kitchen. Don't work with flour; don't let anyone else work with flour in your kitchen; and don't visit with friends and family members in their kitchens while they're working with flour.

Switch to gluten-free pet food. It's theoretically possible for you to avoid the dust if (1) someone else feeds your pet, and (2) you keep the food and the bowl outside. But if you have a close relationship with your pet, you'll be better off switching anyway, since you'll inevitably be exposed.

Avoid places where drywall is being installed. If you need to have work done on your house, have someone else do it and stay away until the work site's been thoroughly cleaned up. Don't use ready-made spackling putty or compound, either, since most are wheat-based.

Exercise caution around store-based bakeries. Some of these seem fine for me, while others get me every time. I think the difference may be in the ventilation systems. If you can smell the bread and cookies baking, you may be risking an airborne reaction.

Consider using a face mask in certain situations. I haven't had great luck with a face mask when I've tried to use it to avoid drywall dust. I still got a reaction — it just took longer. But for short exposures, it might do the trick. I recommend a full respirator, rather than a painter's mask — they're about $40 in home improvement centers. If you have asthma or another respiratory condition that affects your breathing, you should use a respirator with caution and remove it if you have trouble breathing with it on.

Not everyone needs to take all these precautions; if you're not particularly sensitive to gluten cross-contamination, you may be fine in most or all of these situations. But if you find you're still having unexplained symptoms, even though you follow the gluten-free diet very strictly, you might want to check out your environment as well as your food.

Source:

Kasim S. et al. Nonresponsive Celiac Disease Due to Inhaled Gluten. New England Journal of Medicine 2007; 356:2548-2549.

Yikes! My wife works on a horse farm and comes home covered with dust and horse poo. I've been having ongoing problems. Makes me wonder.
  • 0

#14 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 28 April 2012 - 06:57 PM

Good point Squirming! I have long hair...and wear a braid...but hadn't thought of the dust that will get in my hair. I will put it up and wear a mask and a shower cap! How about that! I guess I won't be flirting with any construction workers Monday! Won't I be cute? hey! Maybe Captaincrab?


The shower cap is a great idea. The hair is why I suggested a shower ASAP.

If they are just spackling it's the lesser evil.

What sucks is you'll be the one cleaning, regardless. But your best defense may be an offense - getting them to responsibly clean up after themselves will go a long way. When the crew cleaned up our house it was basic - dust, damp mop, wipe down and made a HUGE difference.
  • 0
Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#15 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 29 April 2012 - 05:11 AM

And it might look sort of silly but can you pin your hair up on your head & cover all with a kerchief or some such type of thing? That way none will get it your hair & then cause you grief.



:lol: Great minds again, dearie! Are you reading my mind somehow? :unsure: you are, aren't you?.... Scary woman!

I had emailed her earlier with this same thought. I know EatMeat has pretty hair down right down to her butt!! I suggested a mask from the drug store, but I also know if she gets even a whiff of gluten, she gets DH sores :( ....

We shall all keep our fingers crossed!!

Meatie, my friend....be VERY careful!! Maybe tell her majesty :) you cannot clean up after that kind of work?
Keep us posted, sweetie.
  • 1

"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif





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