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Drywall Repairs
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Lisa, You have to look for it on these links but yes, wheat starch as well as corn starch is used in making drywall. One may not be able to discern which is used in what but it's certainly being utilized.

http://oklahoma4h.okstate.edu/aitc/lessons/extras/facts/wheat.html

http://www.alibaba.com/showroom/gypsum-board-starch.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starch

http://www.adm.com/en-US/products/industrial/starches-industrial/Pages/default.aspx

http://www.commonfire.org/community/greendetails.html

This one is about using wheat starch in concrete:

http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/ar/archive/jan97/starch.pdf

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Lisa, You have to look for it on these links but yes, wheat starch as well as corn starch is used in making drywall. One may not be able to discern which is used in what but it's certainly being utilized.

http://oklahoma4h.okstate.edu/aitc/lessons/extras/facts/wheat.html

http://www.alibaba.com/showroom/gypsum-board-starch.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starch

http://www.adm.com/en-US/products/industrial/starches-industrial/Pages/default.aspx

http://www.commonfire.org/community/greendetails.html

This one is about using wheat starch in concrete:

http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/ar/archive/jan97/starch.pdf

Thanks for providing those links. The NIH one I posted earlier is also a good one but not all inclusive. It isn't just the drywall, some of those are safe, but also the drywall mud. In addition many wallpapers use 'non-toxic' wheat paste as an adhesive. The OP was right to be concerned. One of the worst glutenings I had post-diagnosis was after doing drywall work in the shop I had back then. That did lead me to do a bit of research into it and that was how I discovered the NIH site.

Keeping my fingers crossed that the OP is able to get through the work without getting 'got'.

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Just to add to the discussion :P

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10192194

CONCLUSION:

Wheat starch-based gluten-free flour products were not harmful in the treatment of coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis

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(Pssstttt.... I think she likes to think she's a leprechaun

Gasp! leprechaun? those old cronies?! bah!!

My pic is of Queen Maeve, the magnificent Warrior Queen of the Faeries.

(and that is your Celtic legend mini-lesson for the day....) :)

P.S.

(and she would also avoid dry wall and wheat starch).

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Just to add to the discussion :P

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10192194

CONCLUSION:

Wheat starch-based gluten-free flour products were not harmful in the treatment of coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis

Well I will just have to run right out and get me some Codex Wheat starch. Nice to know based on this study of abut 50 people I can eat it with no damage. Guess my reaction to drywall mud and wallpaper paste and our European members reactions to Codex were all in our heads.

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Let's also note: that one study about Codex wheat starch-- which is designed for food products in EUROPE--- is from 1999.

Is there anything new on this topic and how does it apply to drywall in the US?

EDITED BY IH--

To answer my own question: :)

I found one more study from 2003---

but it was done by the same team in Finland as the 1999 study involving wheat starch in food.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12622768

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Let's also note: that one study is from 1999.

Does the year invalidate the study? :huh:

I offered the study, because I found it of interest and someone else may also.

I don't argue on this forum. Feel free to if you wish. ;)

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Not saying it "invalidates" it, just wondering if anything else was current? Many times, further scientific inquiry yields drastically different results. The one study I found--done a few years later by the same team in Finland regarding specially formulated wheat starch in food--restates their conclusion. That study is about wheat starch in Europe.

This one study does not change my opinion about eating wheat starch myself or wanting it to be on my food or face where it may be ingested.

What celiac would eat wheat starch? :blink:

I'm with Ravenwoodglass on this point.

And I do not know what Codex wheat starch used in food products in Europe has to do with wheat starch used in drywall in the US?

I know you often ask if there is anything current available, don't you? As we all should, so I asked as well.

I am not arguing with you --I do not argue with anyone!--and I think you may have misinterpreted me.

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The date of this study might make a difference if the wall board industry has changed the composition of the dry wall. Industries do sometimes drastically change what a product is made from in 10+ years. For instance " wood" siding changed the ingredients in the late 90's as some sidings rotted too quickly. Sometimes an ingredient, for lack of a better word, becomes too expensive and a substitute is used. After Hurricane Andrew, wood building materials were expensive so many switched to metal studs in walls.

Is pertains to food products as well & is why we often remind people that a post is old and they may want to seek more current info.

If you are purchasing the building materials, I have found that they may not list wheat but you can call companies and ask. Some won't give you the ingredient list siteing proprietary issues. I found that they will look at the list and tell me if anything list wheat and found that worked OK. I just say " bad allergy".

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The date of this study might make a difference if the wall board industry has changed the composition of the dry wall. Industries do sometimes drastically change what a product is made from in 10+ years. For instance " wood" siding changed the ingredients in the late 90's as some sidings rotted too quickly. Sometimes an ingredient, for lack of a better word, becomes too expensive and a substitute is used. After Hurricane Andrew, wood building materials were expensive so many switched to metal studs in walls.

Is pertains to food products as well & is why we often remind people that a post is old and they may want to seek more current info.

If you are purchasing the building materials, I have found that they may not list wheat but you can call companies and ask. Some won't give you the ingredient list siteing proprietary issues. I found that they will look at the list and tell me if anything list wheat and found that worked OK. I just say " bad allergy".

Good point Karen. Also there is the question of what was being used in drywall when an existing home was built. 1935?, 1950?, 1970? --- these are all factors as is the age of the drywall in one of those homes. Perhaps at some point after the home was built it received damage from say an "Andrew" & the drywall was replaced. These are things we do not know.

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Good point Karen. Also there is the question of what was being used in drywall when an existing home was built. 1935?, 1950?, 1970? --- these are all factors as is the age of the drywall in one of those homes. Perhaps at some point after the home was built it received damage from say an "Andrew" & the drywall was replaced. These are things we do not know.

It's a mystery! Because drywall dust isn't good for anyone to breathe, you should use a respirator or at least an allergy/ sawdust mask. We have a respirator mask and it was less than $100, probably less than $50. I can't remember. My kids re- do thier cars & build robots and things, so we needed one. They do make you look like a creature from Star Wars. :D

Meant to add: turn off heat/ AC and cover vents. This is important for any remodel that produces dust, including wood floor sanding. Wait about 2 days and the dust will have fallen out of the air.

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Meant to add: turn off heat/ AC and cover vents. This is important for any remodel that produces dust, including wood floor sanding. Wait about 2 days and the dust will have fallen out of the air.

That's a really good point. When I was doing drywall work we would use a fine spray mist of water sprayed into the air to try and get the dust to fall more quickly. It also helps to spray just a bit on the seams to keep the dust down when you are doing the finish sanding on the mud.

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I survived the second day of drywall dust and I do not appear to have gotten glutened. I wore a mask all day, I had to shake out the dropcloths and clean up the dust and I'm sure it's still hanging in the air. So either the mask was really effective in keeping me from inhaling the dust particles with gluten...or....there wasn't any gluten in the drywall to begin with. Either way, I'm really glad you all gave me suggestions and I was able to keep myself safe. I covered my hair, wore the mask, showered when I got home and washed my clothes, and I didn't drink from an open cup or glass, and I ate outside. I usually have a cup of coffee and a glass of water sitting there that I drink out of...thinking of the dust...I only drank water from a closed water bottle. I wore gloves and washed my hands a dozen thousand times. But it worked!!!! I stayed healthy and when I got home, I still had the energy to clean up, dress up, and go out for dinner to the Outback with my son for my birthday. So thanks everyone who helped with this situation. I truly appreciate it. I'm sure the reaction can be delayed so I will be watching for sores or headache, but no severe reaction yet and it's been several hours. Very happy about that!

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That's great news!

And happy happy birthday!!!

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I survived the second day of drywall dust and I do not appear to have gotten glutened. I wore a mask all day, I had to shake out the dropcloths and clean up the dust and I'm sure it's still hanging in the air. So either the mask was really effective in keeping me from inhaling the dust particles with gluten...or....there wasn't any gluten in the drywall to begin with. Either way, I'm really glad you all gave me suggestions and I was able to keep myself safe. I covered my hair, wore the mask, showered when I got home and washed my clothes, and I didn't drink from an open cup or glass, and I ate outside. I usually have a cup of coffee and a glass of water sitting there that I drink out of...thinking of the dust...I only drank water from a closed water bottle. I wore gloves and washed my hands a dozen thousand times. But it worked!!!! I stayed healthy and when I got home, I still had the energy to clean up, dress up, and go out for dinner to the Outback with my son for my birthday. So thanks everyone who helped with this situation. I truly appreciate it. I'm sure the reaction can be delayed so I will be watching for sores or headache, but no severe reaction yet and it's been several hours. Very happy about that!

YAAAAAAYYYYYY!!!!!!!

Keep us posted.

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FANTASTIC NEWS, SWEETIE! We can all stop holding our collective breath now--okay, everyone! Breathe!! :lol:

Hope you and T had a wonderful birthday dinner!!xxoo

:)

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Great to hear that things have gone well. Do have a Happy Birthday!!!

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Happy Birthday! :)

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I will be doing some remodeling soon and after reading this thread I contacted USG, the makers of Sheetrock Brand, about wheat being in their products. Specifically I asked about :

SHEETROCK® Brand Easy Sand™ Lightweight Setting-Type Joint Compounds

SHEETROCK® Brand All-Purpose Joint Compound

SHEETROCK® Brand Gypsum Panels

This was my reply:

"We do not use wheat in the production of any of our products. We do recommend wearing a dust mask when sanding any of our Joint Compounds though."

Regards,

Chris Curtiss

Specialist/Service Improvement

Technical Support

550 West Adams St.

Chicago, IL 60661

(312)436-8322

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We are having extensive work done on our house at the moment to make room for a bedroom for my disabled hubby, unfortunately our 7 yr old girl has been ill twice this week and we have noticed a small amount of dry skin formimg on her face. It was purely by a chance remark by someone on the Coeliac uk facebook page that made me google it and I came up with this site. I am so horrified by this and the fact that our daughters health is at risk  :huh: feel awful. Will be eager of any advise you can give

Thanks

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Avoid places where drywall is being installed. If you need to have work done on your house, have someone else do it and stay away until the work site's been thoroughly cleaned up. Don't use ready-made spackling putty or compound, either, since most are wheat-based.

Great. We had a slab leak last month and drywall opened up in several rooms while they rerouted the pipes. I thought the three days of jack hammering just took it's toll. The insurance company delayed and I've been living in my house with drywall everywhere. It was built in '81. I kept waiting to clean it up until after the work was complete and there is still tile to lay!

At the same time, I'm handling enough stress to kill a horse (life and death issues) and have begun to think this lingering reaction to dairy is stress taking it's toll. I feel like I'm drowning. I'm not happy about this drywall revelation :/. No wonder my reintroduction of intolerant foods have all gone south. My poor body.

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Great. We had a slab leak last month and drywall opened up in several rooms while they rerouted the pipes. I thought the three days of jack hammering just took it's toll. The insurance company delayed and I've been living in my house with drywall everywhere. It was built in '81. I kept waiting to clean it up until after the work was complete and there is still tile to lay!

At the same time, I'm handling enough stress to kill a horse (life and death issues) and have begun to think this lingering reaction to dairy is stress taking it's toll. I feel like I'm drowning. I'm not happy about this drywall revelation :/. No wonder my reintroduction of intolerant foods have all gone south. My poor body.

 

 

Ok, just to be clear...this small portion that you have highlighted here?.Those are not my words, okay, but part of a quote from ONE study from one article from a post nearly 2 years ago.

 

If it helps calm your fears, I have had drywall repairs done in my home the last few weeks and nothing has happened to me. 

 

IrishHeart, on 28 Apr 2012 - 9:44 PM, said:snapback.png

Avoid places where drywall is being installed. If you need to have work done on your house, have someone else do it and stay away until the work site's been thoroughly cleaned up. Don't use ready-made spackling putty or compound, either, since most are wheat-based.

 

:)

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Drywall or gypsum board is mainly gypsum ( a ground up rock) and glue. There is a slight chance 1 brand might use a small amount of wheat starch in it but it's not likely nor plentiful. I wouldn't eat it or anything with dust on it - but I doubt most people would. I think I would worry more about getting the wall finished and kicking the insurance companies butt than I would about wheat that probably isn't there.

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If it helps calm your fears, I have had drywall repairs done in my home the last few weeks and nothing has happened to me. 

Drywall or gypsum board is mainly gypsum ( a ground up rock) and glue. There is a slight chance 1 brand might use a small amount of wheat starch in it but it's not likely nor plentiful. I wouldn't eat it or anything with dust on it - but I doubt most people would. I think I would worry more about getting the wall finished and kicking the insurance companies butt than I would about wheat that probably isn't there.

Thanks and good to know! Oddly, it comes up on about.com as well and that's a source I've come to trust. The insurance company has been called and the ball is back in our court.

I'm under a great amount of stress and think this is, most likely, the reason I feel terrible.

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