Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

When Going Gluten Free Isn't Enough


  • Please log in to reply

16 replies to this topic

#16 dilettantesteph

 
dilettantesteph

    Advanced Community Member

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,035 posts
 

Posted 04 May 2012 - 03:44 AM

I've proved gluten isn't the issue with me by eating rye products without problem.

From what I gather, histamine intolerance is kind of like a cup. You can only take so many histamines from the various sources (food's not the only one) and then when the cup fills and starts overflowing you have problems.

Oh, I hope I didn't give the impression that I was doubting that you had figured out your problem. I didn't mean to. It was good that you posted about it in case someone else has it and is unaware.

I just didn't want to discount low levels of gluten in all cases.
  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#17 MariaOfColumbia

 
MariaOfColumbia

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 15 posts
 

Posted 04 May 2012 - 05:23 AM

That's OK. And I'm not trying to imply that everyone ought to try a low histamine diet, either. I kind of envy you folks who only have to avoid gluten.

When I was on a gluten-free diet, I thought that was hard. When I made a combined list of all the foods the various histamine intolerance websites and sat back and looked at it.... I was appalled. Who could do that????

But, it turns out... pain is a powerful behavioral modifier. It turns out that not only can I do the diet, I don't even like the smell of bread any more. I have kind of a "Yuck, that's poison!" reaction now to most of the foods I can't eat.

In case anyone's interested, here's the big list consolidated from all the websites I could find. It contains both foods that have a high histamine content, or foods that cause your body to release histamines.

Alcohol
Anise
Apricot
Artificial colors
Artificial flavors
Avocado
Bacon
Baking mix
Bananas
Beans, red
Beans, soy
Beer
Blue Cheese
Bratwurst
Buttermilk
Cake decorations
Candies, commercial
Cashews
Champagne
Cheese
Cherry
Chicken
Chickpeas
Chocolate
Cider
Cinnamon
Citrus
Cloves
Cocoa
Coffee
Confectionary
Cranberry
Currant
Curry
Date
Drinks, carbonated
egg white
Eggplant
Fish
Fish, canned
Flour, bleached
Gelatin, flavored
Gherkin pickles
Grapefruits
Ham
Icings, ready made
Ketchup
Kiwi
Loganberry
Mango
Margarine
Meals, prepackaged
Meats, leftover
Meats, processed
Milk, flavored
Mincemeat
Miso
Mushrooms
Mustard
Nectarine
Nutmeg
nuts
Olives
Orange
Papayas
Paprika
Parmesan Cheese
Pea
Peach
Peanuts
Pears
Pineapple
Pizza
Plums
Preservatives
Prunes
Prunes, red
Pumpkin
Raisins
Raspberries
Red Wine
Relish
Salads, commercially prepared
Salami
Sauerkraut
Sausage
shellfish
Soy sauce
Spinach
Strawberries
Sunflower seeds
Syrups, flavored
Tangerines
Tea, all
Tea, black
Tofu
Tomato Ketchup
Tomatoes
Vegetables, canned
Vinegar, balsamic
Vinegar, red wine
Walnuts
Wheat
Wine
Yeast
Yogurt
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: