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Domino's "Gluten Free" Crust
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Peter, I was agreeing with you. But I am rather dismayed that these non profit "celiac orgs" and trade groups like National Foundation for Celiac Awareness somehow get associated with this newest version of "GFINO" from Domino's. The Domino's video I saw had their "sticker" on it, saying the NFCA did not recommend this for celiacs. Most common people are not going to hear this properly, and be sort of confused. Domino's guy Phil is implying that if NFCA says "don't eat this if you're celiac" then what they are doing at Domino's is otherwise okay in the gluten free community.

It makes it seem more faddish and trivial, and so many of us are trying to make it serious so we can all help each other to be healthy (and find safe food to eat.)

This drives most of the sensitive people sort of wild down here in the lower American Boondocks.

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I got so excited when I saw the headline that I was pretty pissy when I saw that they come right out and say they make zero effort to even try to keep it safe for anyone. I emailed them saying as much. While the effort could be commendable, they clearly are bandwagoning for profit and don't give a hoot about whether or not it's safe.

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"Domino's and the NFCA found that while the crust is certified as gluten free, current store operations at Domino's cannot guarantee that each handcrafted pizza will be completely free from gluten," the company's news release said."

I hate these pseudo gluten-free menus. It confuses the non- gluten-free people who think we can eat at these places because they have the gluten-free menu.

I was excited to see Dominos offering gluten free pizza and then when I read the article and saw it said it would not be safe for people with celiac disease I was disappointed. I hate these pseudo gluten free menus too and all the pseudo gluten free products. People with celiac are getting lost in this gluten free fad. That is why I don't eat out, don't eat prepakaged food. That way I know I am not eating pseudo gluten free.

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I hate when companies do this....it makes it hard for us who have celiac because it makes non-celiac people think that we can eat everywhere, and they get confused. Of they just think we are crazy, because "come on if it says "gluten free" you can eat it!" "stop being so picky" "quit trying to get so much attention" all of those kinds of comments by uneducated people I know, who I try to educate. But now dominos is gonna go ruin it for me again by trying to gain popularity points with the new gluten free fad diet people....whatever I hope their "gluten-free" pizza doesn't succeed. It's gonna hurt people who are new celiacs and don't understand CC and it hurts us celiacs by making life harder for us socially. :(

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I don't think we can expect dedicated ovens. I do think we should expect fresh toppings, not the cheese they have been putting their flour laden hands in. Locally, Minskys is certified and had training to make gluten-free pizza. They get fresh ingredients from the fridge for the gluten-free pizzas. They put them in the ovens with a 15 in (?) space between them and other pizzas. I have found several " gluten-free" pizza places make the gluten-free pizzas with the same toppings as the regular pizzas. I tried to explain to one place that the cheese was full of flour from the cooks pulling out dough then sticking this rands in the cheese. They just kept saying, " But they use fresh gloves for the gluten-free pizza".

I hope these pizzas aren't around long. Next Robotics season, the lunch parents will order Dominos thinking they can get a pizza for me, too. I hate to tell someone their nice gesture isn't OK.

Godfathers does a gluten-free pizza ( or they did recently). It's OK. They get them frozen and ready to cook in about 3 choices. They have special pans & utensils. That seems the safest for a fast food pizza.

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If they just said "No gluten ingredients, but made in a facility that (yada yada)" I think this would make most people happy. Not as happy as if their stuff actually was okay to have, but still.

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If they just said "No gluten ingredients, but made in a facility that (yada yada)" I think this would make most people happy. Not as happy as if their stuff actually was okay to have, but still.

It doesn't even rise to that standard.

They aren't cleaning their equipment (so to speak).

It's no different than going to a restaurant that is clueless about gluten, trying to order gluten-free, and knowing it will be unsuccessful. It just happens to be pizza instead of a salad, or grilled chicken....

The fact the crust starts out gluten-free is no different than lettuce starting out gluten-free. It's how they screw it up before it hits your plate.

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Labeling aside, I can't imagine any experienced Celiacs being comfortable attempting to eat this. It's just red flags all over.

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Labeling aside, I can't imagine any experienced Celiacs being comfortable attempting to eat this. It's just red flags all over.

I can't imagine anyone who seriously has an issue with gluten or wheat (allergy) trying it. Perhaps if you are gluten light OR if you happen to have a chain that lets you go in and supervise the assembly/baking and tell them how to do it?

I love reading the news reports about this - particularly the phrase "mild gluten allergy". WTF is THAT???

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Just FYI I did a blog on this subject on Celiac.com as I felt it was an important topic: http://www.celiac.com/blogs/358/Dominos-Pizza-Now-Offers-Almost-Gluten-Free-Pizza-So-Be-Careful.html

I left my two cents on your blog:

Thank you for writing this, Scott and for refusing to let them advertise on Celiac.com

I cannot understand any organization looking out for the welfare of those with gluten intolerance (Celiac or NCGI) endorsing this product as safe. The very term "Kitchen practices may vary" makes this entire concept a joke. Can you imagine the degree of cross- contamination? It makes this celiac's stomach turn just thinking about it. This is all about the $$$$$ to be made. This is a company jumping on the "let's put out something and call it gluten-free" bandwagon, with little regard for the people who will undoubtedly suffer the health consequences.

Safe"Gluten free pizza" is not the same as "alternative grain flour pizza dough made with the same equipment as our wheat flour dough and baked in the same ovens".

Don't fall for it. There is better (and safer) gluten-free pizza to be enjoyed. Say NO! to DomiNO!!

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Just FYI I did a blog on this subject on Celiac.com as I felt it was an important topic: http://www.celiac.com/blogs/358/Dominos-Pizza-Now-Offers-Almost-Gluten-Free-Pizza-So-Be-Careful.html

Great blog! This is such a ridiculous grab at the money to be made from people following the "fad" aspects of a gluten-free life. I thank you for your decision to not allow Dominos to advertise here.

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I used to work for Domino's..

The cornmeal they use is everywhere, and its mixed with flour. I wouldn't trust anything from that place. even just meat and cheese will have cornmeal in it.

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I understand the issues with Domino's gluten-free pizza and cross contamination - does the cheese actually contain gluten? also?

I was hoping to take my 10-year-old daughter (diagnosed via blood test - TTG greater than 100 - with celiac one month ago) to get the pizza and see if it bothers her. Is that not a wise decision?

Is cross-contamination always really bad for celiacs or can symptoms dictate how careful you have to be? For instance, although I've spent many years (i.e., 35 years) not feeling well and feel great after going gluten-free, I don't seem to get the immediate reaction to gluten that some get. Does that mean anything or not? (I suspect myself with celiac as well, but wasn't tested until after going gluten-free for too long. It runs in my family, though.)

If my daughter eats at Domino's and feels ok, does that mean it IS ok or is that meaningless?

Thanks!

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Even a small crumb that you can't see is causing an immune reaction. Whether you notice it or not, doesn't mean it isn't happening. It might not manifest as a "stomach" issue. It may be a headache or something else you don't realize is related to gluten.

Cc is an issue. The amount of flour that would be in the cheese from the flour on the workers hand, is enough to make most people sick. The cheese likely, like most cheese, was gluten free until they put thier floury hands in it or stretched the floured dough over it.

Maybe you aren't familiar with Dominos? I say that because you sound like you would go there and eat. It is carry out or pick up as far as I have seen. Find a nicer pizza place that does gluten-free pizza. Call when they aren't busy and talk to the manager. They will cost more but many will get fresh cheese, & toppings for a gluten-free pizza. That's a safer place to go.

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This makes me so irritated. Gluten-free, unless you have to avoid gluten ... what's the point? This is the side effect of the faddishness of the gluten-free diet, where the realy disease is overshadowed by people just "eating healthier."

Peter, I couldn't agree with you more about Il Fornello's. They do a great job there! Their gluten-free pasta is fabulous, and they use the gluten-free pizza crust to make their famous bruschetta. I've never had a problem there, ever. They know exactly what gluten-free truly requires.

As for Dominos... I hated their pizza before I was gluten-free, so personally it's no loss.

However, to those saying it's a step forward, I respectfully disagree. When brand-recognized companies tout "gluten-free" and then don't take the proper steps, it reinforces the preconceived notion so many people already have about us - cross-contamination isn't real, small amounts of gluten won't hurt, "almost gluten-free" is good enough, etc. It puts us all at risk and damages the progress we've made so far. It makes it harder to convince our friends and co-workers that yes, things need to be done properly - even if Domino's doesn't agree.

Sigh.

Pardon my rant, folks - it's been a long day.

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However, to those saying it's a step forward, I respectfully disagree. When brand-recognized companies tout "gluten-free" and then don't take the proper steps, it reinforces the preconceived notion so many people already have about us - cross-contamination isn't real, small amounts of gluten won't hurt, "almost gluten-free" is good enough, etc.

Pardon my rant, folks - it's been a long day.

amen, sister! and yaay! I am so glad to have some company in my "rant fest"!! :lol: thanks for posting, even after a long day. ;)

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Domino's new "gluten free" crust is absolutely horrible in my opinion. My 11 year old daughter was recently diagnosed with celiac. Her friends and school are trying to figure out the things that she can eat. I can not tell you how many times someone has told both me and my husband about this "gluten free" pizza. I then have to explain that it is not actually gluten free since it would be contaminated and my child is not going to be able to eat the pizza. I know that at some point someone will buy this falsely labeled pizza for my child and expect her to eat it at some event or school function without asking me about it. I am trying to teach my daughter how to politely tell people that she can not eat anything contaminated with gluten.

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Pretty certain that Rissoteria in NYC does use dedicated ovens for their gluten-free pizza. I think.

richard

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Just FYI I did a blog on this subject on Celiac.com as I felt it was an important topic: http://www.celiac.com/blogs/358/Dominos-Pizza-Now-Offers-Almost-Gluten-Free-Pizza-So-Be-Careful.html

Thank you so much for doing this.

NFCA response so far is not giving confidence that their intent is "patient" advocacy, if any company can get the "amber" sticker and use it to retail items which are Gluten Free In Name Only, but then the company is targeting marketing to those seeking gluten free food. <_<

NFCA's twitter feed, if anyone wants to see some more spin on this PR clusterglutenuck as they respond to comments (bet they are deleting some of them).

http://twitter.com/#!/CeliacAwareness @CeliacAwareness

Now they're claiming they need blogger outreach to spread the word that "Amber designation means kitchen practices may vary, so it's important to ask questions and consider your needs."

I would be more than happy to spread the word that an "Amber" designation and logo from NFCA means that the item is not really gluten free, and can make celiacs and true gluten intolerants with auto immune reactions quite sick.

What does NFCA stand for, Not For Celiacs All-the-time ? Why are they then using the word Celiac in their name, and then the phrase "mild gluten sensitivity?" as a possible acceptable category of consumer safety ?

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Thank you so much for doing this.

NFCA response so far is not giving confidence that their intent is "patient" advocacy, if any company can get the "amber" sticker and use it to retail items which are Gluten Free In Name Only, but then the company is targeting marketing to those seeking gluten free food. <_<

NFCA's twitter feed, if anyone wants to see some more spin on this PR clusterglutenuck as they respond to comments (bet they are deleting some of them).

http://twitter.com/#!/CeliacAwareness @CeliacAwareness

Now they're claiming they need blogger outreach to spread the word that "Amber designation means kitchen practices may vary, so it's important to ask questions and consider your needs."

I would be more than happy to spread the word that an "Amber" designation and logo from NFCA means that the item is not really gluten free, and can make celiacs and true gluten intolerants with auto immune reactions quite sick.

What does NFCA stand for, Not For Celiacs All-the-time ? Why are they then using the word Celiac in their name, and then the phrase "mild gluten sensitivity?" as a possible acceptable category of consumer safety ?

The Amber designation by NFCA does have a use after seeing what /who they give it to (Domino's bs attempt at gluten-free).

It helps me identify where I WON'T eat.

So yes, please, restaurants go out and get certified so I know NOT to eat there. Do they have an Amber list? I want it! I can enter them into my map bookmarks under "do not eat there".

So see, all is not lost. I don't even have to go to the restaurant, or call and ask about gluten-free. NFCA did it for me and I know NOT TO EAT AT AMBER RESTAURANTS because these are restaurants that have already stated (by earning this prestigious Amber designation) they DON'T HANDLE FOOD SAFELY FOR PEOPLE WITH CELIAC.

See?

I'm going to go have a drink now, and feel sorry for the people in PR @ NFCA.

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Let me see if I understand this.

There are places that offer a pizza crust that does not have any gluten, but who are HONEST in telling us that the contamination risk is likely too high for those with celiac disease.

The NFCA rates them "amber."

We then slam them for being HONEST. While those of us with celiac disease probably can not safely eat there, there are some who may be able to. For them, this information is useful.

I guess that being HONEST and making FULL DISCLOSURE is a BAD thing. That sucks, big time.

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Let me see if I understand this.

There are places that offer a pizza crust that does not have any gluten, but who are HONEST in telling us that the contamination risk is likely too high for those with celiac disease.

The NFCA rates them "amber."

We then slam them for being HONEST. While those of us with celiac disease probably can not safely eat there, there are some who may be able to. For them, this information is useful.

I guess that being HONEST and making FULL DISCLOSURE is a BAD thing. That sucks, big time.

What makes me grouchy is - how will we know it's an "amber" rating? We see gluten-free and think its gluten-free not gluten lite. We might have caught it here , but other places say NFCA certified gluten-free & we think it's safe. If they said "NFCA certified amber level" or "NFCA certifie gluten lite", then we would know. Being "certified" conveys an amount of security that they have had training and are following procedures to make the food gluten-free.

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Let me see if I understand this.

There are places that offer a pizza crust that does not have any gluten, but who are HONEST in telling us that the contamination risk is likely too high for those with celiac disease.

The NFCA rates them "amber."

We then slam them for being HONEST. While those of us with celiac disease probably can not safely eat there, there are some who may be able to. For them, this information is useful.

I guess that being HONEST and making FULL DISCLOSURE is a BAD thing. That sucks, big time.

I completely agree I wish that they wouldn't have labeled the crust gluten-free! Because after being cc with the oven, screens, and utensils. It just like when you pick up a box of cereal, that looks like it could be gluten-free then you start reading the ingredients and there at the bottom in the fine print it says Warning processed and packaged in the same factory as wheat. Maybe even worse than that. I know that I loved Domino's pizza, I worked there and gained like 20 lbs from eating the food. I will miss it, I have often thought about going back to work there but now that's out of the question, just the dust in the air could make me sick.

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Let me see if I understand this.

There are places that offer a pizza crust that does not have any gluten, but who are HONEST in telling us that the contamination risk is likely too high for those with celiac disease.

The NFCA rates them "amber."

We then slam them for being HONEST. While those of us with celiac disease probably can not safely eat there, there are some who may be able to. For them, this information is useful.

I guess that being HONEST and making FULL DISCLOSURE is a BAD thing. That sucks, big time.

I'm absolutely thrilled Domino's is being honest.

I don't see the point in doing what they are doing, the way they are doing it -except to cash in on the gluten-free "diet" trend. But I'm very glad they are being honest (they'd have to be, eventually, when people publicly slammed them for glutening them, so yes it was better to be honest).

I do hope NFCA publishes an Amber list - because it will save a lot of people a lot of time and misery.

I thought this was an excellent blog post http://www.spinningspoons.com/2012/05/why-gluten-free-pizza-at-dominos-does.html

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