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How Accurate Is The Ttg Blood Test?

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Celiac Disease Comprehensive Panel tests are back...I AM FLABBERGASTED TO SAY THE LEAST...Charity, Bethany and I all tested NEGATIVE for Celiac Disease.

Bethany - TTG Antibody IGA <3 (negative is anything <5)

Bethany - Gliadin Antibody (IGA <3 (negative is anything <11)

Charity - TTG Angibody IGA <3 (negative is anything <5)

Charity - Gliadin Antibody <3 (negative is anything <11)

The lab did not perform the rest of the panel based on this information.

Me - TTG Antibody, IGA <3

Me - Gliadin Antibody (IGA) 8

IGA, Serum 212

The lab did not perform the rest of the panel based on this information.

I don't know what to think now. Of course, I am thankful we do not have celiac disease. However, I was certain this was the answer to my babies problems. What do I do now? Bethany is obviously thriving on a gluten free diet so I know there must be some kind of sensitivity. She is still scheduled to see a GI doctor next week.

The above tests did not even show a SENSITIVITY to gluten, right?

What should I do now?

You can read more about my situation in "11 Month Old Starving To Death" in the parents of kids with celiac forum here at


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The tTG test is pretty accurate.

Were you all on gluten before testing? If you were gluten free then that can really screw up tests.


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False positives can occur - a gluten free diet can cause a false positive, and individuals deficient in IGA antibodies and cause a false positive.


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All of the celiac tests can be inaccurate in children under 2 years. Also, there is some question about accuracy under 5 years of age. If your child is thriving on a gluten free diet, I would leave her on it for now. Or you could put her back on gluten and pursue an endoscopy and biopsy. Just be sure to get someone who knows how to do the biopsy properly - 4-6 samples from the 3rd portion of the duodenum. There are cases where intestinal damage is apparent, even when blood work is negative.


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    • Hi Gemini, My birthday is in June, so I'm a Gemini too---and I do agree with some of your good points.  I had written that one could EITHER try Dr. Fine's stool sample testing, where his EnteroLab looks for elevated numbers of IgA antibodies to various food proteins (gluten, milk proteins, soy proteins, yeast proteins, etc.), OR one could just avoid eating or drinking or touching suspect food proteins, for at least a month (3 months is better), and see whether AVOIDING eating and touching such proteins causes improvement or not, in one's symptoms and lab test results. I urge you (and anyone else who wonders about this) to speak by phone, with people working at Dr. Fine's EnteroLab,  and state your objections to them, and see what their replies might be. Here's their phone number: 972-686-6869. I called Dr. Fine's Enterolab, and the folks I spoke with there, were nice enough to reply to any questions that I had, including one lady (I believe she was a nurse) there telling me about the "IgA deficiency" blood test called "total secretory IgA", which one can do first, to see whether it pays to try EnteroLab's stool sample testing! From what I understand, Dr. Fine doesn't try to distinguish between Celiac and non-Celiac forms of gluten "sensitivity". This is because although Celiac Disease is VERY serious, it is the "tip of the gluten-sensitive iceberg", meaning, that higher percentages of gluten-sensitive folks are NON-Celiac gluten-sensitive folks, who can also have major health problems, but the non-Celiac folks have "villi" that are sub-microscopically damaged, and thus, this sub-microscopic villi damage cannot be seen under the microscope--but it's there! And, Dr. Fine's point, is that in both Celiac and non-Celiac types of gluten sensitivity, the cure is the same: AVOID GLUTEN! Dr. Fine doesn't use the term "gluten intolerance", because newer uses of the word "intolerance" refers to NON-PROTEIN intolerances, such as "lactose/milk sugar intolerance" (lactose/milk sugar is a carbohydrate, not a protein), and intolerances are not related to one's immune system, while gluten "sensitivity" and other "sensitivities" ARE related to one's immune system, with ingestion (eating or drinking the offending proteins) causing one's immune system to cause the production of antibodies to those proteins that one is "sensitive" to. Many years ago, a friend of my husband, went to a local doc who told my husband's friend to try avoiding gluten. My husband's friend, without being biopsied, went off gluten, and has become well, ever since that day long ago. Some years ago, both my husband and I did Dr. Fine's "EnteroLab" stool sample testing, for gluten sensitivity. My husband came out positive, and I came out negative. My husband has avoided gluten, ever since then, and I try to do so also, to avoid tempting him to cheat, and he has avoided getting colds, etc., the way he used to, before he stopped eating glutenous foods. And, there is much disagreement (I know, because I'm a retired nurse, and I've been a patient now and then) between doctors, about gluten sensitivity, and about anything medical. So, I've learned to be wary of the terms "valid medical institutions" and "valid medical professionals". What may seem valid today, might be disproved tomorrow, and what might not seem valid today, may be shown to be valid tomorrow. Medicine is always in flux, thankfully. If not, medicine would be "dogma". If you call and speak with Dr. Kenneth Fine (M.D., gastroenterologist, "sensitive" to many food proteins himself, including gluten, but not "Celiac") &/or to the folks working at his Enterolab, please let us know what their replies are, to your objections to his lab's work. In the meantime, let's both try to keep an open mind. Sincerely, Carol Sidofsky (wife of gluten-sensitive non-Celiac hubby, and I'm a retired RN/nurse)
    • Where do you live? I was going to go to Cleveland but just got an appointment with Celiac Center in Boston. 5 hour drive next month. Hoping it is worth the trip. Might be worth looking into.   I just educated a lab on DGP yesterday. They just brought a celiac panel in house and i saw they were using gliadin. I think they are running my sample on the old test in-house and sending it out for DGP to see what happens.     
    • Me too, I am not a member of Medscape.    Is this the article?  I goggled the topic and filtered using "news".  (Hope it works!) Celiac Disease in Children: Experts Clarify Diagnosis and Management Recommendations   Here is what I liked.....a gluten sniffing dog for helping kids to remain dietary compliant!   Count me in!  
    • There is not test for non celiac gluten sensitivity. That would not cause your numbers to be elevated.
    • Sorry it's not working . If you google the article in the first post you should be able to bring it up.  It's from 3 of the leading Celiac Meds Docs so really worth a look.  
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