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Any Advice On Grinding Flours?


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8 replies to this topic

#1 dws

 
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Posted 21 May 2012 - 05:56 PM

Ok, so I'm thinking about taking the plunge and grinding my own flours. Been eyeballing the Nutrimill online- about $270. A voice in my head keeps asking what I will gain by grinding my own, say rice flour. If I am not tolerating rice flour made in a dedicated facility, why would I do any better by grinding my own? I guess one difference would be if I washed the rice before I ground it. I am almost sure some of you do the same based on posts I've read about washing rice before using it. Do any rice flour manufacturers wash it first? I think I read somewhere that you need to wash it or soak it to get rid of a certain taste. What's the best way to dry it after washing it so you can grind it? I have done small amounts in a burr grinder and I dried that in the oven after washing it. I was not happy with the texture the burr grinder produced- not fine enough and it did have a bit of an unpleasant flavor. Any advice?
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#2 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 22 May 2012 - 06:02 AM

As a super sensitive you would also need to sort it. I am surprised how often I find grains that don't belong when I sort mine. Sorting and washing only works for me if it is pretty clean to begin with.
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#3 bennl1

 
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Posted 22 May 2012 - 06:32 AM

A voice in my head keeps asking what I will gain by grinding my own, say rice flour.

I seriously doubt that rice flour imported from Thailand would contain any gluten. The rice factories over there do not process anything other than rice.
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Ben (58)

Diagnosed Celiac 12-Apr-2012
Dairy intolerant, B12 malabsorption, Bile acid malabsorption.
Osteopania
Lifetime of misdiagnoses.

2008-2011 Lived in Thailand, almost symptom free.
Now only eat Thai food.
Easy to cook - gluten/dairy free - delicious

#4 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 22 May 2012 - 12:06 PM

I seriously doubt that rice flour imported from Thailand would contain any gluten. The rice factories over there do not process anything other than rice.



I have ground various flours including bean flour with a Whisper Mill. I think K-Tec Blendtec Kitchen Mill might be my next mill. I am unsure if it will do bean flours or not. I see Azure Standard has a mill for 241 dollars.

I like home milled flour because it still has most of its nutrients in it. The longer particles have been ground the more it loses. I also like the whole grain aspect. When I ate grains I could tell there was an off flavor in flours milled and much later baked.

Happy milling!



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------






Price:

$241.70



Code:

HA108



Size:

1 unit



Shipping Weight:

9.0 lb.

they ended their business though. I am considering a Kted
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#5 dws

 
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Posted 22 May 2012 - 02:12 PM

As a super sensitive you would also need to sort it. I am surprised how often I find grains that don't belong when I sort mine. Sorting and washing only works for me if it is pretty clean to begin with.

Steph, how do you dry yours after you wash it?
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#6 dws

 
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Posted 22 May 2012 - 02:17 PM

I seriously doubt that rice flour imported from Thailand would contain any gluten. The rice factories over there do not process anything other than rice.

Funny you would mention Thai rice flour. I just posted a question about it's purity. Have you ever used Erawan brand? I have seen Thai wheat flour, but judging by your profile, you have a lot of experience with Thai products. So Thai rice flour producers and packagers tend to be a pretty safe bet as far as cc is concerned?
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#7 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 23 May 2012 - 04:39 AM

Steph, how do you dry yours after you wash it?

I either let it dry on the counter or I put it in the oven at low temp.
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#8 bennl1

 
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Posted 23 May 2012 - 08:11 AM

Funny you would mention Thai rice flour. I just posted a question about it's purity. Have you ever used Erawan brand? I have seen Thai wheat flour, but judging by your profile, you have a lot of experience with Thai products. So Thai rice flour producers and packagers tend to be a pretty safe bet as far as cc is concerned?

Not sure I ever used it, logo looks familiar though. The brand is only listed for rice products.
Thailand mostly produces rice and corn in the wet areas, while the little cereal they produce (only 0.5%), they do in the dry areas. Therefore there is very little chance of cross contamination on the land or in the factories/mills.

So far I've only been glutened once, by rice noodles that did not have a Thai address on the pack.
Now I make sure the products I buy are imported as is from Thailand.


(Exception: Mama instant noodles, as they always contain wheat, even the rice varieties.)


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Ben (58)

Diagnosed Celiac 12-Apr-2012
Dairy intolerant, B12 malabsorption, Bile acid malabsorption.
Osteopania
Lifetime of misdiagnoses.

2008-2011 Lived in Thailand, almost symptom free.
Now only eat Thai food.
Easy to cook - gluten/dairy free - delicious

#9 alwaysafter8

 
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Posted 18 June 2012 - 03:53 PM

I use a vitamix blender to blend mine & I can't live without it, especially now that I'm glutenfree.

It's a little bit pricier than just a mill, but it's multifunctional (can make frozen desserts, juiced drinks, smoothies, soups, sauces, nut butters, flours..) just the convenience of being able to make fresh flours & in small batches if necessary. I make a wicked quinoa flour with it :)

I always soak my grains (or sprout them, if I have time) & dry them in the oven. Seems to work the best.
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