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Dry-How To Overcome


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7 replies to this topic

#1 StephanieL

 
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Posted 28 May 2012 - 05:18 PM

So I have been experimenting a lot lately for a class I am working on. I like what I am coming out with for the most part but things seem so dry. Any ideas on how I can change that with the limitations of gluten-free, DF, EF and SF?

Thanks
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#2 Mom23boys

 
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Posted 28 May 2012 - 11:05 PM

I've been experimenting myself. It wasn't bad when we still had eggs but pulling the eggs made things difficult.

I have found that using not 1 but 2 egg subs seems to help. I will use a combo of egg replacer and gelatin in most applications. Be sure and let your gelatin bloom. I know they say either/or but I like both.

If you are using rice flour, let it sit for a while so it doesn't get grainy. If you are using coconut flour, let it sit to absorb water and be prepared to add a little more.

For butter in baking, I've been using canned pumpkin. It gives an odd orange color to everything but it keeps a moist texture.

HTH
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Shellfish free since 1980
Milk free (all forms) since 1991
Feingold in 2003
First gluten-free round 2007
Now entering full time Gluten free, egg free, almond/peanut free

#3 Jestgar

 
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Posted 29 May 2012 - 05:51 AM

I agree with the multiple replacers. Depending on what you are making, try throwing in a well-processed banana, or applesauce, or gelatin, or flax seed, etc.
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#4 kareng

 
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Posted 29 May 2012 - 06:23 AM

Got this from Blender Girl. I'll credit where she got it from when I find it.


"A flax ‘egg’ is only suitable for baking.  Don’t try to make a quiche with it or anything.  Might seem like a no-brainer but … ya never know!

Flax Egg Replacer

1 Tbsp ground flax seed
3 Tbsp fresh water
Whisk together in a small bowl.  Let sit for 5-10 minutes until the mixture gelatinizes into the same texture of a beaten egg.  Whisk once more before using in your recipe.

Recommended for use in baking recipes which call for one or two eggs.  Would likely not be suitable for recipes that call for many eggs."


Here we go: http://www.thegluten...lax-egg-recipe/

This is the website that linked to it:
http://healthyblenderrecipes.com/
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#5 StephanieL

 
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Posted 29 May 2012 - 08:30 AM

I have found that flax goo in bread type applications makes things really gelatinous. I am not a fan. I have also found that rice milk AND rice flour seem to be overload on the rice and I get a gummy texture too.

My pizza dough is pretty good but my shortcakes I made yesterday were really dry (which in this application wasn't too too bad as I just put the strawberry syrup on it early to let it soak in and soften the cake).

I can't do banana (allergy) and again, I am not a fan of the texture applesauce gives things.

I'll look into gelatin. I haven't tried it as an egg replacer. I'll try the two egg replacement thing too!

Thanks
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#6 auzzi

 
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Posted 01 June 2012 - 04:22 AM

Most gluten-free flour/blends require more liquid when baking.

An example of gluten-free mix
1 ˝ c sorghum flour
1 c potato starch or arrowroot
1 c glutinous rice flour
1 c tapioca flour
If you can do moong bean flour, substitute it for 1/2 cup tapioca flour

Dairy Free - If you are lactose free, try lactose-free milk. If not, try coconut milk/cream, juice, rice milk or hemp milk
Try lard, or Coconut oil [mostly solid at room temperature].

Egg Free - Look for recipes that are vegan in origin - no egg or dairy. Mushed chia seeds in water is also a substitute ... Mashed potatoes in place of applesauce [puree vegetable or fruit]

Soy Free - Hmmm-mm-m ... you're on you own with that one ...

Example of a gluten-free/LF/EF recipe:

Shortcakes
1 3/4 cups all-purpose gluten-free flour
1 1/2 ts xanthan gum
2 tbs sugar
1 tbsp gluten-free baking powder
3 tbsp lard or coconut oil
1/2 tsp grated orange peel (zest)
3/4 cup df milk
Preheat oven to 450°F. Grease a baking sheet.
Sift the flour with the baking powder, and sugar. Add the orange peel. Rub the fat into the dry mix until it becomes crumbly. Mix in the liquid to form a really soft dough.Add more liquid if necessary.
On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough into a large circle that's 1/2-inch thick. Using a 2.5-inch cutter, cut out shortcakes.
Place onto the greased cookie sheet and bake in the oven for 12-15 minutes until golden brown.

Notes: 1 egg - 1 tablespoon flax meal or chia seed+ 3 tablespoons hot water. Let stand, stirring occasionally, about 10 minutes or until thick. Use without straining.
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#7 Kelleybean

 
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Posted 03 June 2012 - 04:32 AM

So I have been experimenting a lot lately for a class I am working on. I like what I am coming out with for the most part but things seem so dry. Any ideas on how I can change that with the limitations of gluten-free, DF, EF and SF?

Thanks


I wonder if you could also increase the oil slightly. I make the egg-free cookies from Elana's Pantry a lot (the chocolate chip cookies are a staple in our house!) and sometimes add an extra tablespoon or so of whatever fat I'm using (coconut oil, shortening, etc.). I started doing this b/c my almond flour gets clumpy and I think that was making me use more flour than the recipe called for, but I could see a little extra fat benefitting an egg-free recipe in general.
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#8 JNBunnie1

 
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Posted 04 June 2012 - 03:28 AM

I have found that flax goo in bread type applications makes things really gelatinous. I am not a fan. I have also found that rice milk AND rice flour seem to be overload on the rice and I get a gummy texture too.

My pizza dough is pretty good but my shortcakes I made yesterday were really dry (which in this application wasn't too too bad as I just put the strawberry syrup on it early to let it soak in and soften the cake).

I can't do banana (allergy) and again, I am not a fan of the texture applesauce gives things.

I'll look into gelatin. I haven't tried it as an egg replacer. I'll try the two egg replacement thing too!

Thanks


Ever tried chia seeds? They're used the same way you use flax.
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