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Westbrae Naturals Miso
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Hi everyone,

I bought some Westbrae Naturals Miso (http://www.westbrae.com/products/miso/mbrm.php) when I was travelling because I was craving some miso. Anyway, I figured bcasue it was Hains Celestial it would be okay, because I thought that they note everything.

This company has a line of items that ARE labelled as gluten-free (like Imagine soups). Westbrae Naturals isn't a part of that. I called the company and she basically gave me the "we aren't sure of our suppliers" spiel. Normally I would never buy the item based on this, but I did already buy it because I was away (and it cost $8 so I don't want to toss it or give it away yet!)

I had also emailed the company before calling because it was a weekend. This (below) is what they wrote (note that the link they provide for their gluten-free items does not include the miso).

Looking at the ingredients of the miso, it doesn't include natural flavors. What would you do? Has anyone tried this before? I don't want to take a risk if I don't have to, but I do know I run a tight ship with my celiac.

-----

Thank you for taking the time to contact us regarding our Westbrae Miso Red (4X8) (K) (Wb). We strive to maintain the highest quality products and your satisfaction is very important to us.

We consider gluten to be in the following, barley, bulgur, couscous, durum, graham flour, kamut, malt , rye, semolina, spelt, triticale and any other types of wheat. We do not consider oat products to be gluten free due to the fact that studies are needed to determine the long- term safety of oat consumption. The issue of cross contamination with oat and wheat remains a concern in North America.

Consumer health and safety is our number one concern. We do not have lists of products that are specifically considered to be gluten free. Reading the label is the best way to check for the presence of ingredients which contain gluten. If gluten is a major ingredient, it will be specified in the ingredient list. For consumers concerned about the presence of trace amounts of gluten, we suggest avoiding products that include natural flavors or spices.

Hain Celestial Group products that make a gluten-free claim will carry the triangular Gluten-Free symbol, be labeled gluten-free, or specify Gluten Free certification by GFCO. To learn more about the wide variety of gluten free foods we offer please visit www.glutenfreechoices.com. We hope you find the information, recipes and articles to be a useful resource.

Both major and minor ingredients of all products, as well as all processing procedures and equipment, are closely scrutinized and all potential allergen issues as determined by the Hain Celestial Group are declared on our labeling.

We assure you that strict manufacturing processes and procedures are in place and that all of our manufacturing facilities follow rigid allergen control programs that include staff training, segregation of allergen ingredients, production scheduling, and thorough cleaning and sanitation.

Thank you for your continued support. If we can be of further assistance, please feel free to contact us at 1-800-434-4246, Monday through Friday from 7AM - 5PM Mountain Time.

Sigrid

Consumer Relations Representative

----

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The starter culture for miso can be grown on barley and when it is that barley is not considered an ingredient since it is later separated from the part that is put into the miso product. If you go to South River Miso Co.'s website they have a great explanation with photos of the miso making process. I know some disagree with me, but that part of the process and labeling issue with regards to barley is why I don't eat comercially made miso unless I can confirm it is made with kome koji, meaning the starter culture is grown on rice.

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Miss's Mom summed it up. With miso you have to know how it was made. Im working in JApan right now and last night asked to see the package of miso -- something not done here but once i explained why the staf and chef at a small restaurant became interested in knowing more. It was kome koji or rice starter and made with daizo ( soy beans) instead of barley. A lot of red miso is made from barley. If you have a japanese market in your town then you cna almost always find at least 1 type of miso you can have.

Hi everyone,

I bought some Westbrae Naturals Miso (http://www.westbrae....s/miso/mbrm.php) when I was travelling because I was craving some miso. Anyway, I figured bcasue it was Hains Celestial it would be okay, because I thought that they note everything.

This company has a line of items that ARE labelled as gluten-free (like Imagine soups). Westbrae Naturals isn't a part of that. I called the company and she basically gave me the "we aren't sure of our suppliers" spiel. Normally I would never buy the item based on this, but I did already buy it because I was away (and it cost $8 so I don't want to toss it or give it away yet!)

I had also emailed the company before calling because it was a weekend. This (below) is what they wrote (note that the link they provide for their gluten-free items does not include the miso).

Looking at the ingredients of the miso, it doesn't include natural flavors. What would you do? Has anyone tried this before? I don't want to take a risk if I don't have to, but I do know I run a tight ship with my celiac.

-----

Thank you for taking the time to contact us regarding our Westbrae Miso Red (4X8) (K) (Wb). We strive to maintain the highest quality products and your satisfaction is very important to us.

We consider gluten to be in the following, barley, bulgur, couscous, durum, graham flour, kamut, malt , rye, semolina, spelt, triticale and any other types of wheat. We do not consider oat products to be gluten free due to the fact that studies are needed to determine the long- term safety of oat consumption. The issue of cross contamination with oat and wheat remains a concern in North America.

Consumer health and safety is our number one concern. We do not have lists of products that are specifically considered to be gluten free. Reading the label is the best way to check for the presence of ingredients which contain gluten. If gluten is a major ingredient, it will be specified in the ingredient list. For consumers concerned about the presence of trace amounts of gluten, we suggest avoiding products that include natural flavors or spices.

Hain Celestial Group products that make a gluten-free claim will carry the triangular Gluten-Free symbol, be labeled gluten-free, or specify Gluten Free certification by GFCO. To learn more about the wide variety of gluten free foods we offer please visit www.glutenfreechoices.com. We hope you find the information, recipes and articles to be a useful resource.

Both major and minor ingredients of all products, as well as all processing procedures and equipment, are closely scrutinized and all potential allergen issues as determined by the Hain Celestial Group are declared on our labeling.

We assure you that strict manufacturing processes and procedures are in place and that all of our manufacturing facilities follow rigid allergen control programs that include staff training, segregation of allergen ingredients, production scheduling, and thorough cleaning and sanitation.

Thank you for your continued support. If we can be of further assistance, please feel free to contact us at 1-800-434-4246, Monday through Friday from 7AM - 5PM Mountain Time.

Sigrid

Consumer Relations Representative

----

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Miss's Mom summed it up. With miso you have to know how it was made. Im working in JApan right now and last night asked to see the package of miso -- something not done here but once i explained why the staf and chef at a small restaurant became interested in knowing more. It was kome koji or rice starter and made with daizo ( soy beans) instead of barley. A lot of red miso is made from barley. If you have a japanese market in your town then you cna almost always find at least 1 type of miso you can have.

How do I find this out for this one? I tried it anyway and am not 100% sure how I felt.

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Contact the mfr. and ask what grains are innoculated with the starter culture and what grains are used in the bed that the starter culture is grown on. Leave the word gluten out of it. You will know by what grains they use, you know which grains contain gluten. Look up info. on how miso is made and then you can make an informed decision whether or not you feel it is safe, if it is grown on gluten containing grains, if you feel that it is possible that even if those grains are not included as an ingredient in the final product that they are removed thoroughly enough to make the miso gluten-free to your satisfaction.

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sometimes on imported miso the english label will cover the japanese label which often gives much more detailed info. You could try to find someone to read it for you or post a picture and either Missys mom, or I or someone else should be able to tell what the starter was

How do I find this out for this one? I tried it anyway and am not 100% sure how I felt.

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I had called them and their reply was about. The actual ingredients are here: http://www.westbrae.com/products/miso/mbrm.php

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