Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Oh, It's Just The New Thing!


  • Please log in to reply

8 replies to this topic

#1 KMMO320

 
KMMO320

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 159 posts
 

Posted 01 June 2012 - 04:30 AM

This is what EVERYONE aside from my sis in law who has celiac disease has said to me. Everyone from my husband, coworkers, my boss (I waitress), friends, family, etc. EVERYONE!

Oh, Gluten is the new bad guy, Dr's tell people it's gluten only because they dont know what it REALLY is. How can wheat cause this. Its just the new thing, its all in your head. The Dr is making you think its Gluten but its not.

And more...

Of course, most times I ignore it..but there are sometime I wonder if I am "going along" with it and believing in the new thing...

The non-support is actually more frustrating than having to eat gluten-free.

Also, everyone tells me its a way for companies to make money off me buying the "expensive food" Actually, all I have bought gluten-free so far are donuts...otherwise, I stocked my house full of just naturally gluten-free foods..
My sis in law who is Celiac has even said that only about 2%of her weekly shopping is on gluten-free foods..everything else she buys is just normal, naturally gluten-free food...
  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 dani nero

 
dani nero

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 623 posts
 

Posted 01 June 2012 - 05:10 AM

Just give them a small history lesson in celiac. It was discovered ages ago. There's nothing new or "thingie" about it. It's just what it is. If people care less about educating themselves by actually reading rather than just watching silly shows, why should we bugger ourselves over it ;-)

My whole family except for my mom and hubs don't believe me, and I'm still in the process of making myself care less about what they thing.
We need to relax, care less about their "oh so insightful opinions" that come from daily shows, and enjoy our journeys to good health being gluten-free :-)
  • 1
Self diagnosed January 2012, and on elimination, low-salicylate & low-iodine diet.
Also G6PD

#3 mommida

 
mommida

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,945 posts
 

Posted 01 June 2012 - 06:32 AM

Here's some history. It is believed to be the "wasting away" disease described in the Bible.

The cure was discovered through the starving children of Belgum during the war. Children who had been diagnosed as failure to thrive, became "healthier" when they were STARVING. This lead to the conection ~it was food related. They usually just left the person on a banana diet.

You have to remember there was no "routine" endoscopy in the past. The furthest information gastroenterology had was from Dr. Beaumont. Dr. Beaumont had a patient that was accidentally shot in the stomach. The wound never healed properly and left in layman's terms a "window" into his gut. So Beaumont got to watch human digestion through this window and was termed "the father of gastro physiology"

If this "fad" term is happening because more people are asking to be tested. At least people are hearing about Celiac and DH begging to be tested. Because it matches symptoms that they have had for (what 40 some years depending on their age)?

One out of every 300 people are estimated to have Celiac/ DH. The number is probably higher, because doctors really haven't tested. (It was a blind study of blood supply~ only blood donations were sampled) I always get turned down for being underweight, anemic, and so on. So how are the true bunch of undiagnosed Celiacs going to donate blood? ;)

Sorry went on a Cliff Claven rant. :ph34r: :ph34r:
  • 1
Michigan

#4 bartfull

 
bartfull

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,563 posts
 

Posted 01 June 2012 - 08:54 AM

As more and more people hear about it, even if it is through the hype from the famous people who are going gluten-free without needing to, more and more people might put two and two together. If people who actually HAVE Celiac discover it and start eating gluten-free and thereby prevent all of the terrible things that can happen to a Celiac who continues to eat wheat, it is worth it. We who truly have the disease may suffer from the taunts and pooh-poohs of others, but our suffering is nothing compared to the cancer, neurological problems, thydroid problems and the like that an undiagnosed Celiac faces.

Just last night I was talking to a lady I know about it. After hearing the non-digestive symptoms that I have, she now believes her daughter may have it. She has thydroid problems, rashes, and balance problems. I half expect her to show up here in the next day or two. I hope she gets tested, or at least tries gluten-free to see if it helps. I made it a point to direct her to this site so she can learn HOW to go gluten-free - reading labels, CC issues, all the pitfalls that await us in the grocery stores.
  • 0

gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#5 Pegleg84

 
Pegleg84

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 612 posts
 

Posted 01 June 2012 - 10:46 AM

Yeah, I get a lot of this too. More people are eating gluten free even though they don't have Celiac or an intolerance. I'm not saying it's not healthier to eat gluten free, I just think you're crazy to do it if you don't have to!

I inherited Celiac from both sides of my family. My aunt developed thyroid cancer partially due to undiagnosed celiac. It's definitely not in your head. Also, if eating gluten free makes you feel better, then you should eat gluten-free regardless of any diagnosis.

Just tell your friends/family (as I often do) that the gluten-free diet keeps you a healthier, happier person and they don't want to be around to face the consequences if you get glutened.

Education and awareness helps (how many times have we explained our condition to someone..?), and reminding them that it's a DISEASE, not a fad, and that you wouldn't be doing it if you didn't have to.

Also, if more people eating gluten-free means better/more affordable gluten-free products for the rest of us, all the better.
(though don't get me on a rant about exploiting the celiac. When you're stuck at a restaurant where the only option is a tiny salad, or $5 extra for pizza, what do you think...)

Peg
  • 0

~ Be a light unto yourself. ~ - The Buddha

- Gluten-free since March 2009 (not officially diagnosed, but most likely Celiac). Symptoms have greatly improved or disappeared since.
- Soy intolerant. Dairy free (likely casein intolerant). Problems with eggs, quinoa, brown rice

- mild gastritis seen on endoscopy Oct 2012. Not sure if healed or not.
- Family members with Celiac: Mother, sister, aunt on mother's side, aunt and uncle on father's side, more being diagnosed every year.


#6 1974girl

 
1974girl

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 318 posts
 

Posted 01 June 2012 - 11:42 AM

I was scared it was going to be a passing phase..finding gluten free food in the store. But, my SIL's nephew has autism and has been told to go gluten free. Considering how high the autism rate is, it wouldn't suprise me if they find out it is caused by what we are doing to our food in America! When everything (practically) gets better when gluten free, I think the awareness will just grow...and hopefully the menu! I have friends who do gluten free for their daughter's ticks. Within 3 days they were gone. I am for finding a cure and the University of Chicago says by 2026, they will have one for celiac. However, I wish more studies would be done on how our wheat crop is different than it used to be and maybe stop these other problems as well.
  • 0

#7 KMMO320

 
KMMO320

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 159 posts
 

Posted 01 June 2012 - 12:44 PM

Today's food makes me so.scared and I dont.know.if.its that medical.science is more advanced and thats why they can diagnose more problems, or that our nutrition.is so poor that more problems are arising. Scary times.
  • 0

#8 JNBunnie1

 
JNBunnie1

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,326 posts
 

Posted 01 June 2012 - 02:39 PM

I have friends who do gluten free for their daughter's ticks. Within 3 days they were gone.

By this I assume you mean nervous tics, not biting ticks?


Just checking....

:ph34r: :ph34r:
  • 0
If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

#9 jeanzdyn

 
jeanzdyn

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 94 posts
 

Posted 01 June 2012 - 02:58 PM

of course people who have not suffered stomach cramps or chronic diarrhea would think that you are just on a 'fad diet' or something. tell them, in graphic details, about your symptoms!

If you feel better gluten free that is all that really matters!


I want to add that, although some gluten free items are expensive, you can find a lot of gluten free foods that are not any more expensive than any other food items.
I eat a lot less now that I am gluten free, so that $3.50 bag of rice noodles is about 8 meals, and maybe 10 meals, depending on what I have with the rice noodles.
  • 0
What is food to one man may be fierce poison to others. —--Lucretius


I miss bread! But I love Kinnikinnick gluten free pizza crust.


Diagnosed celiac disease: November 2011 (biopsy and endoscopy)
other conditions: asthma, arthritis




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: