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Advice On Re-Glutening


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#31 IrishHeart

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 04:28 AM

I'm thinking of the people who match my 3 assumptions. Certainly not everybody, but enough people that I don't think the gluten-free is for everybody, either.
Like I said, my original comment was getting very carried away. I was thinking about people who advocate gluten free for *everybody* and don't bother putting any qualifiers on it. I'm sorry if it sounded like I thought that it was a bad diet in general.


You seem to have many misconceptions about the gluten-free diet. And I am "one of those people" :lol: who think everyone would really be healthier off gluten, although I do not "push it" because no one wants to give up their fattening packaged goodies. I also think it is a grain that is difficult to digest and that gluten intolerance is more common than the medical community believes.

But, I am a "live and let live" kinda girl and it's not my business to be the "gluten police".

FYI, the bread I eat is full of fiber --not sugar-- and I make it myself. I have a fiber -rich, nutrient- rich diet full of vegetables, fruit, nuts and various alternative grains.

I am lacking in nothing.

Post diagnosis, I eat far healthier than I ever have in my life. My husband (not a celiac), my best friend with MS (not a DXed celiac) and my Mom (never tested but had many symptoms) are all gluten-free --by choice--and are healthier than most people I know. They all work out at the gym several times a week and do not look (or act) their ages....they are all healthy and vibrant people.

Gluten- filled wheat bread is the not the holy grail of fiber and nutrients. Not at all.

You may wish to learn more about nutrition and what's involved in a healthy gluten free diet, as I suspect you are going to need it.

Best wishes--and we're here for you when you are ready!
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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


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#32 parmeisan

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 06:39 AM

I don't doubt it! I know that it is possible, even the most likely scenario, that a person will eat better off gluten than on it. Celiacs, for one thing, tend to learn everything they need to know to manage the diet - they need to in order to survive. People who know celiacs are likely to be well-versed as well. I imagine that when/if any of you suggests to a friend that they might give up gluten, you probably tell them which breads to eat, maybe give them some recipes, tell them where to shop, suggest what they might eat instead and explain why they will be healthier off of gluten. If not all those things, then at least some.

I'm clearly not explaining myself very well. My problem, the reason I was ranting to begin with, was with people who don't know anything about gluten getting excited about this gluten-free thing. Celebrities twittering to thousands of people at once that everyone should get off gluten. Or, one of my best friends who has been going on and on to me about the gluten-free diet and the primal diet and so forth (and was very "I-told-you-so" when I told her I might have Celiac; that was a little frustrating) and although she may understand some of the reasoning behind it, that's not what she talks to other people about. Word gets spread through third- and fourth-hand information and it's *dangerous* because if ALL you know is, "someone or other says gluten is bad" then you may end up doing it very, very wrong.

It's also dangerous because there's all these restaurants now that claim to be gluten-free when all they are is using gluten-free ingredients, but that's a different story. At least it seems to be raising awareness to the point where more shopping malls have gluten-free sections and new labelling laws are getting made in Canada which include gluten among many other allergens.
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29 years old
Migraines my whole life
Diagnosed Anemic in ~2003
Diagnosed GAD in ~2005
Non-ulcer stomach issues in ~2006
Major acid reflux issues in 2012
Positive blood test for Celiac in 2012, biopsy scheduled

#33 Jestgar

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 06:56 AM

I'm clearly not explaining myself very well. My problem, the reason I was ranting to begin with, was with people who don't know anything about gluten getting excited about this gluten-free thing. Celebrities twittering to thousands of people at once that everyone should get off gluten. Or, one of my best friends who has been going on and on to me about the gluten-free diet and the primal diet and so forth (and was very "I-told-you-so" when I told her I might have Celiac; that was a little frustrating) and although she may understand some of the reasoning behind it, that's not what she talks to other people about. Word gets spread through third- and fourth-hand information and it's *dangerous* because if ALL you know is, "someone or other says gluten is bad" then you may end up doing it very, very wrong.

I totally get this. I had a sister-in-law who decided to be vegetarian - except she just stopped eating meat. Her diet consisted mainly of bread, french fries, and candy. Someone who isn't making good food choices before gluten-free, and doesn't bother to change those habits, is going to be far worse off in the long run.
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#34 IrishHeart

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 07:02 AM

Someone who isn't making good food choices before gluten-free, and doesn't bother to change those habits, is going to be far worse off in the long run.



EGGS-actly. :)
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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#35 parmeisan

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 01:50 PM

I should probably update this before I go posting in other places on this board, in case people are curious about how I got where I am now from where I was.

Basically, I started feeling the difference. It wasn't sudden like I thought it would be, but gradually I began to notice how bad I felt all the time, and realized that I had forgotten how bad I was feeling just before the original diagnosis - the reason I'd asked to get tested. Off gluten, I didn't feel much different (like, definitively different) from the "usual", except that I was equating "usual" with a long-term average... and in a relatively short period, I was feeling just like I had been in the worst of the worst days. A reminder that I apparently needed.

(If you're wondering why I thought it would be sudden, it's because 1) I had heard horror stories, and 2) early on after going gluten-free, I had gotten suddenly and violently sick one evening, and I figured that was a glutening).

Anyway, so I went back off gluten and have stayed off since. My doctor gave me a "symptomatic diagnosis" or something like that. The GI still wants to do a biopsy and I'm going to let him, because a "gold standard" diagnosis would still be very nice, but I'm past needing it. The only reason left for having it is to make it easier to convince my family to get themselves tested. So I'll let him do it, but I'm only going back on gluten for a week or two, maybe three if I'm feeling daring, and I'm fully aware that this means the results will almost certainly be completely inconclusive, but I'm not letting that worry me.
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29 years old
Migraines my whole life
Diagnosed Anemic in ~2003
Diagnosed GAD in ~2005
Non-ulcer stomach issues in ~2006
Major acid reflux issues in 2012
Positive blood test for Celiac in 2012, biopsy scheduled


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