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Is Modified Food Starch Ok?


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13 replies to this topic

#1 1974girl

 
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Posted 19 June 2012 - 02:42 PM

Just checked out Elizabeth Hasselbecks book today and she said I have to watch Modified Food Starch on labels. WHAT? I thought if it was in America they had to label if wheat was in it. Do I have to call everytime I see that? I have been assuming it was corn starch. She said that food starch is mostly corn but when they add the word MODIFIED, you have to check. Do I? If so, I have screwed up for 6 months.
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#2 Lisa

 
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Posted 19 June 2012 - 02:48 PM

I have not read the book, but as I understand there are many inaccuracies in her book.

Modified Food Starch is general gluten free (corn) in the US. If derived from wheat, it by law, must be listed as "Modified Food Starch (wheat)".
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Lisa

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#3 1974girl

 
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Posted 19 June 2012 - 02:58 PM

Whew! I did find some things that I thought were a little out there. I mean, I don't take shampoo to the hairdresser. They lean you back...how in the world would you get it in your MOUTH? She said she was sick from inhaling hairspray. She won't let pedicure people rub lotion on her LEGS! Unless I was grossly informed by the nutritionist (who also has celiac) it can't seep in your skin. And I don't lick legs. : ) I am not knocking it. I like anyone bringing awareness to celiac but just scared.
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#4 Gemini

 
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Posted 19 June 2012 - 04:56 PM

Whew! I did find some things that I thought were a little out there. I mean, I don't take shampoo to the hairdresser. They lean you back...how in the world would you get it in your MOUTH? She said she was sick from inhaling hairspray. She won't let pedicure people rub lotion on her LEGS! Unless I was grossly informed by the nutritionist (who also has celiac) it can't seep in your skin. And I don't lick legs. : ) I am not knocking it. I like anyone bringing awareness to celiac but just scared.


I would take everything Hasselbeck says with a HUGE grain of salt. You do not have to take your own shampoo to the hairdressers, unless you only use a certain shampoo all the time. I get my hair colored every 4 weeks because my hair now grows incredibly fast and use their color and shampoo/conditioner and have never had any issue with it. You are correct, it does not cross the skin barrier. She's another paranoid person who spouts erroneous information. I suppose you may become sick from hairspray that contains wheat but I have yet to find one that does. Who inhales hairspray on a regular basis anyway? There are enough chemicals in it to make anyone sick, regardless of gluten.

Modified food starch is fine unless labeled as Lisa says.
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#5 psawyer

 
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Posted 19 June 2012 - 05:06 PM

I would take everything Hasselbeck says with a HUGE grain of salt.

As would I. Modified food starch is safe, unless the word "wheat" also appears on the label.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
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#6 ~**caselynn**~

 
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Posted 19 June 2012 - 05:08 PM

So here's my answer: if it says modified food starch on the label- I avoid at all cost. If it says modified corn starch, modified potato starch then okay- it's defined so that good. Anything I question I either google or just plain don't eat it. No definition in food starches is a chance to get glutened and I'm not up for that. I hope this helps! :)
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#7 psawyer

 
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Posted 19 June 2012 - 05:19 PM

So here's my answer: if it says modified food starch on the label- I avoid at all cost. If it says modified corn starch, modified potato starch then okay- it's defined so that good. Anything I question I either google or just plain don't eat it. No definition in food starches is a chance to get glutened and I'm not up for that. I hope this helps! :)

Your choice, if you want to go that way. In twelve years on the gluten-free diet I have never found a case where modified food starch actually WAS wheat. In both the US and Canada, if it IS wheat, the word wheat is required to appear on the label. Options are:

Modified wheat starch;
Modified food starch (wheat);
Modified food starch, with a separate "Contains wheat" statement.

In Canada, the third option will no longer be allowed beginning in August 2012. The source of the MFS will have to be identified (as will "vegetable" proteins and oils).

Rye and barley never hide as starches.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
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#8 Lisa

 
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Posted 19 June 2012 - 05:19 PM

So here's my answer: if it says modified food starch on the label- I avoid at all cost. If it says modified corn starch, modified potato starch then okay- it's defined so that good. Anything I question I either google or just plain don't eat it. No definition in food starches is a chance to get glutened and I'm not up for that. I hope this helps! :)


Let me clarify this a little bit Caselynn. If you are in the US, and you see a product which indicated Modified Food Starch as an ingredient, it will be safe for you to consume.

By US law, if the source ingredient is wheat (which would be rare or non existent) it would be required to be listed as "Modified Food Starch (wheat)" If you do not see wheat, it's okay.

It's as simple as reading the label. There is a lot of confusing information out there. Trying to simplify our lives, is not always that easy. ;)

(Uh...Peter and I posted at the same time)
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Lisa

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#9 ~**caselynn**~

 
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Posted 19 June 2012 - 05:27 PM

Ya know, I have never heard that! Very interesting, where do you find these laws? I'd like to read up on it. I'm a US citizen but have a large amount of family in Canada an I have a more difficult time to read the labels there, an not because they are half French lol. Idk if it's that I'm not used to them or is there a huge difference? Hoping you have some info on this as well! 😄

Ps: don't listen to Elizabeth Hasselback....she's a bit neurotic in my opinion lol why make life harder? 😜
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#10 Lisa

 
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Posted 19 June 2012 - 05:38 PM

Ya know, I have never heard that! Very interesting, where do you find these laws? I'd like to read up on it. I'm a US citizen but have a large amount of family in Canada an I have a more difficult time to read the labels there, an not because they are half French lol. Idk if it's that I'm not used to them or is there a huge difference? Hoping you have some info on this as well! ��

Ps: don't listen to Elizabeth Hasselback....she's a bit neurotic in my opinion lol why make life harder? ��

Wheat is listed as one of the eight allergen that are required to be listed, if an ingredient in a product, in the US.

Google US allergen laws. :)
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Lisa

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#11 psawyer

 
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Posted 19 June 2012 - 05:45 PM

In the US, the top eight allergens must be clearly disclosed. They can be in the ingredients list, or in a "Contains" statement following the list. Either one meets the legal requirement, but many companies do both.

The eight allergens under the federal Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA) are: wheat, soy, milk, peanuts, eggs, tree nuts, fish, and crustacean shellfish.

FALCPA requires that in the case of tree nuts, the specific type of nut must be declared (e.g., almonds, pecans, or walnuts). The species must be declared for fish (e.g., bass, flounder, or cod) and Crustacean shellfish (e.g., crab, lobster, or shrimp).

Here is a good summary of FALCPA.

Canadian rules are similar. They are regulations, not statutes. The Canadian "Priority Allergens" include FALCPA's eight as well as sesame seeds and sulphites. New regulations taking effect August 4, 2012, add rye, barley, oats and mustard seed to the priority list. Priority allergens must be clearly disclosed on the label. Click here for more.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
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#12 ~**caselynn**~

 
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Posted 19 June 2012 - 07:08 PM

Thanks for the info! 😃
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#13 Takala

 
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Posted 20 June 2012 - 02:02 PM

1. Modified food starch, in the United States. We have had this conversation before. I wish I had saved the thread. It is possible that the modified food starch can contain gluten, although it is unlikely, because of a loophole in the labeling laws for the USDA vs. the FDA. The rules differ for the 2 govt. agencies. I have had people jumping up and down my throat on this in the past, I imagine they will do it in the future, I do not care, I invite them to do my chores for me while I'm down on the floor in agony from eating a supposedly "safe" "gluten free" product with modified food starch which was not clearly labeled and sourced. Remember some of your base ingredients are imported from other countries. Also, your corn starch could have been harvested with equipment that was used on wheat,rye or barley, stored in bins that had wheat,rye, or barley, or was processed in facilities which process wheat,rye, or barley, because that particular corn starch was not dedicated to a gluten free manufacturing and consumer line. The allergy rules (USA, year 2012) say wheat must be called, it ignores barley.

I have bought 50 lb sacks of pure grain for animal feeds for over 25 years, I've never had a sack of one single grain, that didn't have at least a few kernels of something ELSE completely different in it, which is something I keep in mind and don't mind sharing. This also varies. It's roulette, most of the time you're lucky, sometimes you won't be. Some human food manufacturing companies are very good with their labels and source purity, some are not.



2. Hairspray status, USA


I suppose you may become sick from hairspray that contains wheat but I have yet to find one that does.


November 2011 list of hairspray products which do and do not contain gluten: http://www.(Company Name Removed - They Spammed This Forum and are Banned).com/gluten-free-hairspray/


Alright, that is not helpful in not being able to direct people to the link at c------diva.

The following Product lines either contain gluten, or say it may be present in their fragrances of their hairspray: Nexxus: (Most of their products contain wheat. The representative was very helpful though. She said if there is any derivative of gluten, it will be clearly listed on the bottle), Big Sexy, Aussie (Aussie can’t guarantee their hairsprays are gluten free due to the fragrances),Fat Hair and Herbal Essence (gluten is not directly added to Herbal Essence, , but could be present in the fragrances).


Some Paul Mitchell's, most Chi's hairsprays are gluten free. Sebastian is gluten-free, some Bed Heads, the L'oreal non aerosol line, Mega, Elnet Satin, Vivepro are gluten free. Tresemme will label gluten and some are gluten-free. Dove is gluten free and will label. Rave is gluten free, will label, and Suave is gluten-free and will label. Both Rave and Dove reps said to watch for "cetyl alcohol" which can be derived from gluten grains. VO5 is gluten free but does not guarantee free from trace amounts from manufacturing. Garnier Fructis is gluten free, Aubrey Organics is gluten free, Head Organics and Finesse is gluten free.
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#14 Gemini

 
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Posted 20 June 2012 - 03:24 PM

1.Modified food starch, in the United States. We have had this conversation before. I wish I had saved the thread. It is possible that the modified food starch can contain gluten, although it is unlikely, because of a loophole in the labeling laws for the USDA vs. the FDA. The rules differ for the 2 govt. agencies. I have had people jumping up and down my throat on this in the past, I imagine they will do it in the future, I do not care, I invite them to do my chores for me while I'm down on the floor in agony from eating a supposedly "safe" "gluten free" product with modified food starch which was not clearly labeled and sourced. Remember some of your base ingredients are imported from other countries. Also, your corn starch could have been harvested with equipment that was used on wheat,rye or barley, stored in bins that had wheat,rye, or barley, or was processed in facilities which process wheat,rye, or barley, because that particular corn starch was not dedicated to a gluten free manufacturing and consumer line. The allergy rules (USA, year 2012) say wheat must be called, it ignores barley.


Yes, we have had this conversation before and I think that Peter and Lisa explained things pretty clearly. Anything imported from other countries would still fall under the labeling laws for the US so if you can read a label, you should be able to figure it out. That doesn't apply to newbies but you are only confusing things and scaring unnecessarily. I don't know anyone who has become sick from modified food starch and most Celiacs who have done their homework know this is a safe product when purchased in the US or Canada. I have also never heard of barley being used in modified food starch. I guess it could happen because anything is possible in life but the odds are pretty slim that anyone has to worry about barley being in food starch.

I have bought 50 lb sacks of pure grain for animal feeds for over 25 years, I've never had a sack of one single grain, that didn't have at least a few kernels of something ELSE completely different in it, which is something I keep in mind and don't mind sharing. This also varies. It's roulette, most of the time you're lucky, sometimes you won't be. Some human food manufacturing companies are very good with their labels and source purity, some are not.


If food was that much of a crap shoot, then no Celiac would ever recover. I get what you are saying but I think you have to just research things well and not be overly worried about it as that in itself will keep you sick....and afraid to eat.


2. Hairspray status, USA


November 2011 list of hairspray products which do and do not contain gluten: http://www.(Company Name Removed - They Spammed This Forum and are Banned).com/gluten-free-hairspray/


Alright, that is not helpful in not being able to direct people to the link at c------diva.



Some Paul Mitchell's, most Chi's hairsprays are gluten free. Sebastian is gluten-free, some Bed Heads, the L'oreal non aerosol line, Mega, Elnet Satin, Vivepro are gluten free. Tresemme will label gluten and some are gluten-free. Dove is gluten free and will label. Rave is gluten free, will label, and Suave is gluten-free and will label. Both Rave and Dove reps said to watch for "cetyl alcohol" which can be derived from gluten grains. VO5 is gluten free but does not guarantee free from trace amounts from manufacturing. Garnier Fructis is gluten free, Aubrey Organics is gluten free, Head Organics and Finesse is gluten free.



That explains why I have never found wheat in hairspray. I use the better products which do not contain wheat. It is sort of like going to a high end restaurant vs. a fast food joint....you can guess which one you'll have better luck at getting a truly gluten-free meal. I can only imagine that if you inhale any hairspray on a regular basis, I would be more worried about the chemicals you are ingesting vs. any wheat in the spray.
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