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Homeschool
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I am thinking of homeschooling my son. I hate to think of dealing with school, diabetes, and celiac. If I don't homeschool we would send my son to a Christian school that my husband attended. My daughter is in kindergarden there now, and they do SO MUCH with food. I just don't want to deal with it.

Does anyone here homeschool and can you tell me the pro's and cons of it?

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I am thinking of homeschooling my son.  I hate to think of dealing with school, diabetes, and celiac.  If I don't homeschool we would send my son to a Christian school that my husband attended.  My daughter is in kindergarden there now, and they do SO MUCH with food.  I just don't want to deal with it.

Does anyone here homeschool and can you tell me the pro's and cons of it?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Every school we've been involved in does a lot with food. We've been dealing with this problem for years -- our older son has food allergies and could potentially have a fatal reaction if he gets exposed (forget being sick for several days... this is pretty scary). It's not just school, it's also church -- snacks in Sunday school, etc. Everywhere we go, people hand out cookies, candy, etc. Getting hair cut, piano lessons, etc. etc.

I know one of the reasons there's an obesity problem in the U.S. People have a really hard time setting limits.

In the end it has to do with your comfort level. We've done really well just sending our kids off to school. My oldest is incredibly responsible and doesn't eat anything offered to him. My youngest is in kindergarten and he knows he can't have any food but the food we send with him. I am also in very good contact with the teachers and have obtained the birthday calendars so I can send an alternative treats for those days. So far we haven't had any problems and I feel pretty comfortable about everything. (We don't deal with diabetes, so I can't offer any experience there.)

Carrie

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Lots of my friends homeschool. It's weird because we have a fantastic school. My older sons best friend is homeschooled. I would say that it's worked out well for them. I would say the pros are connected with your lifestyle. Relaxed scheduals, spur of the moment activities, outings.., individualizing the work to your child's needs-moving ahead quickly or staying with a subject longer when needed.

One of my friends HS's for religious reasons, the other does it because her son 1)requested to be, 2) she was ticked off at the school for a specific reason, 3) her son is very good at math and she wanted to push him ahead at a pace that was meaningful to him.

I actually homeschooled last year... loved/hated it. It's a mixed bag of experiences. I hated our last school enough to HAVE to homeschool. You do what you have to do, I guess. I PREFER to have my kids in school. We are back at our school this year and loving the social aspect of it.

There's a lot of food in my school as well. I mean, it's disgusting how much CRAP they hand out. It makes me sick when I think of the bucket of gluten full twizzlers my Celiac kid's teacher has on her first grade desk. She hands the things out for all sorts of rewards. But my kids totally dig the social aspect of our school. It's a very fun and friendly place to be. I wouldn't trade that for less stress about the food. I just make a daily appearence at my son's lunch, see his teacher everyday in the cafeteria, send him with gluten awareness shirts, arm him with confidence to tell everyone offering him food, "NO". We want them to be confident, social people, so I think it's best to send them off to school and teach them how to deal with the difficulties of being in these situations. I can't think of any situation I've held my celiac disease son back from based on his celiac disease. I don't want him to grow up feeling that there are things he can't participate in socially because he has a food intolerance. He just goes and brings his own gluten-free foods. He does day camps, he does everything. It's just more work for me! :lol:

That being said, two of my very best friends DO homeschool. I've got nothing against it for any reason. It's your choice. I guess I'm just not overwhelmed enough by celiac disease to think it would be easier to keep him home. You might not feel so worried in a few more years. You're still pretty new to celiac disease and schools are really good and knowledgable about diabetes. We have diabetic kids in our school and teachers seem very able to understand those restrictions better than celiac disease. Just take it one day at a time and don't cross anything off the list for now.

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Hi Lucy,

I've homeschooled for 12 years now. There are a way more positives than negatives. My kids not only acedemics but life skills as well. My son is 16 and my daughter is 13 and both are out going, can carry on a conversation with people of all ages. Their education is very well rounded. There are companies that actively seek out homeschooled graduates as they are more capable of working on their own and not having to be babysat in order to get the job done. My son worked this summer at a construction job. The contractor called him Mr. Reliable as she knew he would always show up for work, no so with other teen workers.

Private school wasn't an option as the christian school here had the same social problems as the public, so why spend money for a bad education. We are Christians and so one of the main reasons for homeschooling was all the immoral, ungodly stuff the schools teach. But what really pushed us was when my kids and I were at the public swimming pool a teenager called my son fatty. My son wasn't fat but due to genetics, asthma, and premature birth, Ben had a large girth. Then at a children's party where a ice cream cake was being served, (my son is highly allergic to milk) I told the parents who are close friends to make sure Ben didn't get any. The other kids who were 5 year olds, teased him so badly about not eating the cake that he snuck a piece. It took 4 weeks to get his asthma back under control. Now if this could happen in a controlled atmosphere, what would happen at school?

No, I'm a total homeschool advocate. It's not just the schooling, is a whole rounded education.

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I tried homeschooling for a few years, public school for a few years, and private school for a few years so I have tried it all. I personally liked to be homeschooled. I was able to have a life during school and it didn't take nearly as long. It also taught me to be more independent. I am very social and have many friends from church, sports, people I used to go to school with, and just people I meet while I'm out. I was also able to skip a grade because I learned so much more through homeschooling so then I was able to graduate at 16.

My cousins do it to and my cousin is 15 and he is I believe a sophomore in high school and also taking college courses.

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I homeschooled myself the last two years of high shool, and what surprised me the most was how much I could get accomplished in such a short amount of time. I actually worked full time, saved my money for a trip to Australia after I graduated, and I did all the school work by myself. I was a different person once I got out of public school......I felt a huge weight being lifted off me without the peer pressure. I actually concentrated on learning for the first time in a very long time. I also found college was a breeze, it was pretty much a continuation of what I had already been doing. I've read alot of other homeschooler stories who felt the same way.

Since I enjoyed it so much, I am considering it again for my kids. I've read a ton of books on the topic, and attended a few h/s meetings in our area. I'm lucky in that there seem to be a large number of h/s kids where we live, and there are a gazillion opportunities for socialization, teaching ideas, textbook trading, etc. For me, it would be essential to have a large network of other h/s parents to talk to.

Now I just need to muster up the guts to actually TRY it next year. I am a "by the rules" type of person, so to do something as unconventional as homeschooling is a real challenge for me. My family thinks I'm crazy for even thinking about it, they can't fathom why I wouldn't want to ship their little behinds off to school one after the other! Which, maybe they are right. In three years, I could be home alone all day, sipping my cup of coffee in my quiet house...for eight hours of solitude heaven. I dunno, maybe I can find a part time school, so then I can get my hours of solitude at least twice a week? LOL....good luck in your quest for schooling, it's very daunting!

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Lucy,

My daughter is type 1 and Celiac. She started Kindergarten August 29th. I was a wreck. She takes her own snack, she was able to have one snack that the rest of the class had (carrots and ranch dressing) and she was so excited (that was the heart breaking thing for me not her). I have a sharpee marker and write the carb count and her name on the bag. But I have to say that the school nurse has been great. We have a notebook that goes back and forth. She calls me with any concerns. And she is absolutly great with me calling for any concerns. Granted it hasn't been that long, but I wanted to share a somewhat positive experience with you.

Laua

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My son is 7 and my daughters are 5 and they all have multiple food allergies, including gluten. We have not been tested for celiac, yet gluten is definitely not an option for my kids. My son went to public school in Kindergarten and I sent his snack everyday, but he was always frustrated that he could not eat what the other kids ate. Not only that, but he has behavior problems when he does eat certain foods and I was still trying to figure everything out back then. That was difficult for his teacher.

For 1st grade we decided to try homeschooling. I was still trying to work out glitches in my childrens' diet. It went really well and my son actually liked it better than public school. With my kids, foods affect not only their behavior, but also their learning. We can move at a pace beneficial to my children and make sure a concept is learned before moving on. People worry about children not being socialized when homeschooled, but it is actually just the opposite. My kids actually have more opportunity to be kids and do activities and meet with people of all different ages. It also provides time to volunteer in the community, which is great experience for anyone.

This year my son is in 2nd grade and my girls are in kindergarten. We have a public school program that is just for homeschoolers 2 days a week in the afternoon. They learn art, music, science and spanish those 2 afternoons. It takes some of the pressure off of me homeschooling, gets them some time in the classroom with different teachers, and also allows them to make more friends and build relationships. Even if you homeschool, the public schools will allow you to come in their classroom for various activities, including extra curricular.

This has been a good balance for our family. The kids love it and it has sure taken the pressure off with the foods. Yes, at church, at school, in activities, anywhere you go you will deal with food issues, yet whatever you choose to do you will adjust to. Don't forget, just because you make one decision now does not mean you can't change your mind down the road. You may choose to homeschool now until you get the food issues under control then choose public schools later.

I do have one suggestion if you choose to homeschool. Get involved in a local support group. It opens up a whole new world for your children, plus gets you the support you need. You would also be amazed the other people that you meet in this support group that also deal with alleries, intolerances and diseases.

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I think it is really up to how your kid is. You could do some home schooling and some not. I am glad to have gone all 12 years in public school.

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You appear to be a Christian. That in itself means only one thing...pray and decide what you do based on what direction God leads. We have homeschooled for 15 years now. It has been a wonderful experience that I would not trade for anything. We knew from day one, however, that it was what our family was called to do. Pray. Research. Do what you are called to do, whichever way that goes.

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I am PRAYING, and I feel like homeschooling is the way I want to go, but then I get negative vibes from others. (my husband isn't so sure about it). He is worried about what others will think of us. I would need his support to do it.

I am so glad that some of you that were homeschooled replied. That is who I most want to hear from. People who have been thru it.

Our school doesn't have a nurse (our kids will go to private Christian school if they are not homeschooled.). So the diabetes thing is a big worry as well.

I have two years to think on it, but I would like to start homeschooling my daughter next year if I decide to do it. So I am doing alot of research and love to talk about it with anyone. I am amazed what some people think about it. I havn't seen an unsuccessful homeschool story yet, but poeple (who don't know anyone personnaly who have been homeschooled) sure are negative towards it.

I'll keep praying.

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Well, I wouldn't expect people who chose to homeschool to acknowledge the negatives. That's like admitting they made a bad choice. There is a defensive reaction to chosing something that isn't considered "the norm". Sometimes that is manifested in an impossibly perfect description of *reality*. I find the over the top, wonderful stories about how great homeschooling is a little suspect. Nothing's perfect. I did it for a year, but I'm not opposed to *a good* public school, either. Homeschooling wasn't a major ordeal, but I disagree with those who say socializing isn't a big deal when you homeschool. It IS clearly easier to expose your kids to more socializing in a public school. Of course, there's a lot of negatives that go along with some of that "socializing". There are some characters out there. BUUUUT, it's a good way to learn how to deal with those bad kids.... Either choice has good points as well as bad points. As I mentioned in a previous post, my two friends have chosen to homeschool. I'm not against homeschooling, but I don't think it's a cure-all for the negatives of the public school experience. Plus, one more thing -- and this will surely ruffle some feathers-- I have a teaching degree. I don't agree that being a parent is qualification enough to educate children. This may not apply to the younger grades, but it certainly applies to the higher grades...fifth and up. This isn't a debate board, so I won't engage in a heated controversy over my opinion here. I'm just responding to your post. There are negatives to homeschooling. You've clearly begun considering the negatives of public school but to be fair, you should actually go to the school in question, state your concerns and find out how they would address them. Maybe this is all over nothing and you'll find your school is more than happy to address your concerns in a way that totally satisfies you. Most importantly, keep a realistic expectation of homeschooling. You don't want to be overwhelmed by the task simply because you didn't get well-rounded advice on what to expect. I agree with the -pray about it- advice.

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Public school is not an option. It would be a Christian elemetry school (with no nurse to treat diabetes) or homeschool.

I know that homeschool can be bad, my sister tried and HATED it. I only want to do what is best, so I'll be taking this year to pray and research it. Thanks so much. I DO appreciate your opinion, because you have tried both.

I have a ? for you. Do you regret homeschooling for that year? Do you feel that your kids suffered doing it for that short of time? I am looking at it from every angle.

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My dd ia 3 and we're not sure what route we're going take as well. I have met several people in our area that home school. I actually met them through our local co-op. A lot of the people eat like my family. :) We were invited to a toddler playgroup and all the children except one has food issues. The parents met at the library once a month for support and to share ideas and plan events. They also have book fairs, playdates and luches in the park. I was a little unsure about the social aspect but I was suprised to find out that they're very social.

The great thing is their are so many options and each family can find a great fit.

We're going to pray also that we'll be led in the right direction. We are also looking a private shcool as well. :)

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While it might not be an immediate solution, perhaps getting a teaching certification, *then* homeschooling could be an option. It's interesting... I excelled, throughout school, in all subjects. (Yeah, I was the nerdy one who'd be picked on.) And I did a lot of tutoring of my peers in a number of subjects. But I know there's a lot I don't know about how to teach. It's a skill in and of itself, and not always an easy one, from my limited experience with tutoring! (And I know that hardly scratches the surface.) Again, I realize that approach has a number of issues (particularly when it comes to the next few years), but it's an option as well.

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Public school is not an option.  It would be a Christian elemetry school (with no nurse to treat diabetes) or homeschool. 

I know that homeschool can be bad,  my sister tried and HATED it.  I only want to do what is best,  so I'll be taking this year to pray and research it.  Thanks so much.  I DO appreciate your opinion,  because you have tried both. 

I have a ?  for you.  Do you regret homeschooling for that year?  Do you feel that your kids suffered doing it for that short of time?  I am looking at it from every angle.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

My kids did well academically for the year we homeschooled. My son was tested the following year and placed in the gifted program. My daugher learned all of her cursive, mulitplication and basic division before third grade. It's fairly easy to teach kids academics in a homeschool environment because of the time you can devote to individual instruction. Once a child understands the instructions, they can't be stopped. We only did school work for three hours a day and played the rest of the day. We had "school" four days a week because I felt that being a mom was what I really wanted to be...not a teacher. I didn't like taking on the role of educator. I have a strong opinion about being a MOM verses being a TEACHER. Maybe because I have a degree in teaching?? I don't know. I prefer being "mom".

I do not think my kids did well socially the year we homeschooled. I know there are loads of things to do, blah, blah, blah... I don't agree that they fit the bill. There are all sorts of exceptions you have to make- ages of these groups can be quite diverse, religious beliefs can be quite extreme, reasons for choosing homeschooling vary and not everyone is doing it for reasons that make sense to me. I did it because the school district we were in was lousy. Education is important to me. Some people have some pretty wacky definitions of "education".

Personally, MY SOCIAL life suffered the year we homeschooled. I was not happy with the folks I was meeting. I thought the parents were weird, the kids were weird and I was thrilled to move back to my old school district and get my kids back into the public school where diversity reigns. My three kids have three different personalities and they are all re-connected with their friends. I have a diverse group of women I chat with again. I think the homeschooling world is a little too limited for MY social needs. I know my kids were unhappy, and I know they're happier being in public school.

It depends on how good your school options are. If we were faced with a lousy public school again, I'd homeschool again. I wouldn't write off homeschooling even with the negatives, but I would base my decision on the educational aspects not the social, or medical needs of my kids. Social and medical issues are easy to work out. Educational shortcomings are non-negotiable. I cannot see sending my kids to school for 6-8 hours a day then supplimenting away my only time with them later in the evening. That's a waste of time and robs us of our time to be a family.

Oh, do I regret it?? I regret that it was the best choice for my kids at that time. I feel that my kids get more out of being in a large, diverse group with a multitude of authority personalities directing them in the skills they were trained to teach. I believe my kids perfer to relate to me as "mom". I prefer to be their mom and not their academic educator. That's my opinion!

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Wow Jnkmnky,

That makes me feel a little better. I tried all summer to get my 5 year old to write her name. I didn't want to make it a "thing" so I backed off and I was sure that the I would get calls about how behind she is and so forth. Don't you know that sweetheart came home after the first day of school and had written her name, not once but maybe 3 or 4 times. She did it right away for the teacher. That and similiar experiences with my 6 year old are why at this point I won't homeschool (we are fortunate and live in a good school district). And both of my kids love school.

Lucy I wish you the best with your decision, because it is a hard one. Only you know what is right for you and your children. And I don't know if you have already checked it out, but our Christian book store has an entire section on home school stuff.

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There are also computer programs for homeschooling. A Christian thing called Switched On Schoolhouse has a pretty good program...it grades everything except projects and essay questions. I would recommend it...I used it in the years I was homeschooled...my mom was not my teacher..the computer was. Anyways, I have tried public, private, and homeschool so I have got a taste of everything. It is really a personal decision and homeschooling may fit some but not others ...it depends on the personalities of the kids and parents as well.

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It is really a personal decision and homeschooling may fit some but not others ...it depends on the personalities of the kids and parents as well.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

It could also be the sort of thing that fits someone at one time, but not at another. Maybe this is a good year for it, maybe it isn't...

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There's no harm in trying it. You can try homeschooling during summer vacation to see if it's something that works for you. I would recommend the "Making the Grade...Everything your ___ grader needs to know" series. It's published by Barron's and the author is Elena R. Arrigo. I loved the guideline it provided. I purchased all of my other books (and I purchased many) around the themes in the MtG books. Also, some states do NOT require homeschoolers to report the Science and Social Studies content they plan to study. I think that's totally crazy. The book I recommed offers comprehensive content guidelines for both those areas. Thumb through it at Borders if you get a chance. There are tons of options for you in this area. I just prefered this book.

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I am currently homeschooling my oldest son. He is 6 and he is in Kindergarten. WE are using a program called Abekka. I was SO nervous about it and almost sent him to a Christian school, but then felt I couldn't do it. I had prayed for two years about it, planned, researched, etc. I just really wanted to try it. I felt he was too young to go out and be constantly exposed to negative influences. At least until he had a good Christian foundation. I also felt that he would have more freedom to learn independantly through play, etc. IT has been easier then I thought it would be and much more fun! He loves it and I haven't fought with him once! I also have two other boys that are 3.5 years old and 18 months (my 18month old is my celiac).

There were alot of people negative about homeschooling, but I think it is because they aren't doing it and haven't tried it. Academically my son has done great and it has been about a month. He is already reading 3 and 4 letter words. He is learning so much and I know when he isn't getting something and we spend extra time on that area.

As far as socializing is concerned I agree with what some other people said here. THeir kids are able to carry on conversations with adults and all age groups, not just kids their age.

My son does gymnastics once a week. I do want to get involved in some sort of homeschooling support group. We are working on that. Mainly so we can do field trips with other kids and mom can have support.

Anyway, I don't think you need to have a degree in education to teach your child. There are DVD's, etc. You don't have to commit to it for life and I am sure you can do Kindergarten!

I love it and he is thriving! He is learning responsibilities at home too. He does chores and helps look out for his brothers!

I would love to offer you any help or ideas if you want to chat off this board. I was so nervous to start, but once I got started I really love it.

Good luck and pray alot about it!

Monica

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We are planning to homeschool our girls. The decision wasn't solely based on their food issues but it did play a small role in it. Our youngest is super sensitive and I really don't see how she could go to public school and not risk cross contamination. Homeschooling is a very personal decision, some people are very passionate about their decision to stay home and school their children while others are very passionate about their children attending public school. To each his own.

Me and my brother were both homeschooled and we did very well. I feel like we've both turned into well rounded adults who are a functioning part of society. The social issue was not a problem for us. We were always around other kids and adults, it's not like we spent all of our time closed up in our home :P I went to public school 2nd-4th grade and absolutely hated it. I was in gifted classes and still got bored. I'm not saying I'm a genius or anything just that public school does not always challenge some children.

For me, I feel like it's my responsibility to teach and guide my children...I'm not sure why that should stop once they reach school age. And as far as qualification, you do not need a degree to teach your children. There are plenty of smart and creative people who do not possess a degree. I read this article recently and thought it was really good "The ten most important things you need to know about homeschooling"

I love number 2 where it says "You are qualified to homeschool your children if you love to read to them, love to spend time with them, love to explore the world with them, love to see them learn new things and, most important, love them."

In the end you just have to do what you feel is best for your children.

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We are a homeschool family and love every second of it! In fact, we just got back from a rather spur-of-the-moment camping trip in the middle of the week. (One of my favorite things about homeschooling is the free schedule. You can go whenever and wherever your education may take you!) My kids are very into astronomy, but we live in the city where it is hard to see the stars. An impromptu camping trip in the mountains allowed them to view the stars (we brought along our telescope too) unfettered by the city's light pollution. Then we hiked the nature trails, toured an Arboretum, and generally just had a great time!

There are countless advantages to homeschooling. You won't even realize them all until/unless you are doing it yourself. We began seven years ago and haven't looked back since. By the way, my husband wasn't on board with it at first either. I asked him to give me a year to try it out and he was sold just a few months into it! He is now one of homeschooling's biggest supporters. :D

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Where we live there 2 public home school options where the kids can home school and a tiny bit of public school all paid for with public school funding, pretty cool. Also we have one charter school that is not allowed to do any holidays at all. Bet they do less food. Check out you options. :)

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My kids are 11 and 12 and have never been to school, aside to visit friends once in kindy! We've been homeschooling all along. It has been a wonderful experience for our family.

In our state, the laws only require registering the year the child turns 7 and testing periodically. In our city, there are many homeschoolers, with a wide range of driving philosophies and socioeconomic circumstances. I've noticed that most of these families seem to be making the choice that is right for them. The best part is that we really do have access to a diverse community of homeschoolers and a lot of options to support our choices.

I started off with a relaxed, "unschooly" approach. We pursued interests together, had play groups, and I "strewed" their path with a lot of different things that might pique their interests. We read together, cooked together, shopped together, etc. As they got a bit older, we dabbled in workbooks, as a fun, optional activity. They got some educational video games to play, and we went to regular park days. When they grew a bit older, they were ready for community center classes, music lessons, community service, and scouting.

Homeschooling is great for dealing with special needs of all kinds. In our family, I never really thought of my kids as special needs. However, it has really stood out to me how lucky we are when I've talked with school parents dealing with the same issues. In the context of school the impact their issues have on their lives is so much more negative.

My son was a late reader. I am so glad we homeschooled with a relaxed approach and knew other kids who were also "late" readers, because I wasn't panicking or making all our focus be on the one thing he couldn't do. Instead, I helped him pursue his interests and do his other academic work by reading it to him. It turned out that when we went gluten-free he suddenly became able to read!!! Both kids' ADD issues and his extreme dyslexia went away in a matter of a couple months. Imagine if he'd been in school all that time, being made to feel dumb for not reading!

My daughter has Tourette's syndrome and struggled with crippling anxiety. When she was 4 the drs told us to put her on anti-anxiety medicine so that she would be able to be left at preschool. We opted not to. Instead, I gave her extra attachment and let her develop at her own pace. She did eventually become ready to be left in group environments without me. Her Tourette's wasn't something we saw as terribly severe - usually her tics don't cause physical pain or major disruption. However, I met another family whose girl's tics were far less severe than my daughter's, and they thought it was a MAJOR problem because of the reaction of fellow students and teachers. The girl would get in trouble for her tics, the kids would make fun of her, and they disrupted the class environment.

Having had to become very careful about our diet, being homeschoolers has been a help there, too. We have much greater control over what foods our kids are exposed to, and we don't have to worry about teachers and administrators not getting it in the same way as school families do. Our kids do go to camps and classes and we do have to send all their own food, talk with the teachers, and take other precautions. We've even had a couple bad experiences. However, the difference is that we are the CUSTOMERS of these camps and classes. We get to leave if it is not working. They actually have a vested interest in meeting our needs. Additionally, the teacher:student ratio is much better and they are not as frazzled and overworked as school teachers tend to be.

Our kids are now "middle school" age and they have a great need to spend time with their peers. Just today my daughter rode the bus to her friend's house, where a group of them spent the day sewing, painting, and crafting elaborate costumes. Both the kids are now enrolled in a home education resource center which offers weekly 1 hour classes in topics taught by parents and community experts. Here is a small sampling of the classes my kids are now/have taken:

- fashion design & redesign

- history through archaeology

- language arts

- folk dancing (including geography)

- graphic design

- LEGO robotics competition

- journalism

- musician's circle

We also have decided to use a curriculum for math and completely love Life of Fred. The author is Christian and we are not, however it is not heavy handed. In fact, it is hilarious.

Even if we didn't live in an area with all these resources, I'm confident we could have a positive experience as a homeschooling family. We've had years where we didn't sign up for a bunch of outside stuff and have done great. Our first homeschooling community was found on-line, there are so many groups with different focuses, there is sure to be one with people you can relate to. We've juggled many life changes, from demanding jobs to unemployment, from married life to divorce, to bringing in a step-parent. All the while we've homeschooled, and have always been able to make it work.

The best part of homeschooling is the connections you can build as a family. My kids actually *like* each other. We spend time together as a family and get to enjoy it, because it's not all about getting homework done in time, getting to practice in time, getting to school on time. Every now and then I ask them if they'd like to try school. They do have some friends who go to school. Some are in mainstream public school, others at charter schools. The answer is always no - they love homeschooling, too.

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