Jump to content



   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


- - - - -

Homeschool


  • Please log in to reply
29 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_Lucy_*

Guest_Lucy_*
  • Guests

Posted 12 September 2005 - 02:05 PM

I am thinking of homeschooling my son. I hate to think of dealing with school, diabetes, and celiac. If I don't homeschool we would send my son to a Christian school that my husband attended. My daughter is in kindergarden there now, and they do SO MUCH with food. I just don't want to deal with it.

Does anyone here homeschool and can you tell me the pro's and cons of it?
  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 carrielynn

carrielynn

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 64 posts

Posted 12 September 2005 - 07:28 PM

I am thinking of homeschooling my son.  I hate to think of dealing with school, diabetes, and celiac.  If I don't homeschool we would send my son to a Christian school that my husband attended.  My daughter is in kindergarden there now, and they do SO MUCH with food.  I just don't want to deal with it.

Does anyone here homeschool and can you tell me the pro's and cons of it?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Every school we've been involved in does a lot with food. We've been dealing with this problem for years -- our older son has food allergies and could potentially have a fatal reaction if he gets exposed (forget being sick for several days... this is pretty scary). It's not just school, it's also church -- snacks in Sunday school, etc. Everywhere we go, people hand out cookies, candy, etc. Getting hair cut, piano lessons, etc. etc.

I know one of the reasons there's an obesity problem in the U.S. People have a really hard time setting limits.

In the end it has to do with your comfort level. We've done really well just sending our kids off to school. My oldest is incredibly responsible and doesn't eat anything offered to him. My youngest is in kindergarten and he knows he can't have any food but the food we send with him. I am also in very good contact with the teachers and have obtained the birthday calendars so I can send an alternative treats for those days. So far we haven't had any problems and I feel pretty comfortable about everything. (We don't deal with diabetes, so I can't offer any experience there.)

Carrie
  • 0

#3 Jnkmnky

Jnkmnky

    Bloom where you are planted.

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,350 posts

Posted 12 September 2005 - 08:35 PM

Lots of my friends homeschool. It's weird because we have a fantastic school. My older sons best friend is homeschooled. I would say that it's worked out well for them. I would say the pros are connected with your lifestyle. Relaxed scheduals, spur of the moment activities, outings.., individualizing the work to your child's needs-moving ahead quickly or staying with a subject longer when needed.
One of my friends HS's for religious reasons, the other does it because her son 1)requested to be, 2) she was ticked off at the school for a specific reason, 3) her son is very good at math and she wanted to push him ahead at a pace that was meaningful to him.
I actually homeschooled last year... loved/hated it. It's a mixed bag of experiences. I hated our last school enough to HAVE to homeschool. You do what you have to do, I guess. I PREFER to have my kids in school. We are back at our school this year and loving the social aspect of it.
There's a lot of food in my school as well. I mean, it's disgusting how much CRAP they hand out. It makes me sick when I think of the bucket of gluten full twizzlers my Celiac kid's teacher has on her first grade desk. She hands the things out for all sorts of rewards. But my kids totally dig the social aspect of our school. It's a very fun and friendly place to be. I wouldn't trade that for less stress about the food. I just make a daily appearence at my son's lunch, see his teacher everyday in the cafeteria, send him with gluten awareness shirts, arm him with confidence to tell everyone offering him food, "NO". We want them to be confident, social people, so I think it's best to send them off to school and teach them how to deal with the difficulties of being in these situations. I can't think of any situation I've held my celiac disease son back from based on his celiac disease. I don't want him to grow up feeling that there are things he can't participate in socially because he has a food intolerance. He just goes and brings his own gluten-free foods. He does day camps, he does everything. It's just more work for me! :lol:
That being said, two of my very best friends DO homeschool. I've got nothing against it for any reason. It's your choice. I guess I'm just not overwhelmed enough by celiac disease to think it would be easier to keep him home. You might not feel so worried in a few more years. You're still pretty new to celiac disease and schools are really good and knowledgable about diabetes. We have diabetic kids in our school and teachers seem very able to understand those restrictions better than celiac disease. Just take it one day at a time and don't cross anything off the list for now.
  • 0
I believe in God.

#4 Corrine

Corrine

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 37 posts

Posted 13 September 2005 - 10:35 AM

Hi Lucy,
I've homeschooled for 12 years now. There are a way more positives than negatives. My kids not only acedemics but life skills as well. My son is 16 and my daughter is 13 and both are out going, can carry on a conversation with people of all ages. Their education is very well rounded. There are companies that actively seek out homeschooled graduates as they are more capable of working on their own and not having to be babysat in order to get the job done. My son worked this summer at a construction job. The contractor called him Mr. Reliable as she knew he would always show up for work, no so with other teen workers.
Private school wasn't an option as the christian school here had the same social problems as the public, so why spend money for a bad education. We are Christians and so one of the main reasons for homeschooling was all the immoral, ungodly stuff the schools teach. But what really pushed us was when my kids and I were at the public swimming pool a teenager called my son fatty. My son wasn't fat but due to genetics, asthma, and premature birth, Ben had a large girth. Then at a children's party where a ice cream cake was being served, (my son is highly allergic to milk) I told the parents who are close friends to make sure Ben didn't get any. The other kids who were 5 year olds, teased him so badly about not eating the cake that he snuck a piece. It took 4 weeks to get his asthma back under control. Now if this could happen in a controlled atmosphere, what would happen at school?
No, I'm a total homeschool advocate. It's not just the schooling, is a whole rounded education.
  • 0

#5 KaitiUSA

KaitiUSA

    Be the change you wish to see in the world!

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,583 posts

Posted 13 September 2005 - 11:48 AM

I tried homeschooling for a few years, public school for a few years, and private school for a few years so I have tried it all. I personally liked to be homeschooled. I was able to have a life during school and it didn't take nearly as long. It also taught me to be more independent. I am very social and have many friends from church, sports, people I used to go to school with, and just people I meet while I'm out. I was also able to skip a grade because I learned so much more through homeschooling so then I was able to graduate at 16.
My cousins do it to and my cousin is 15 and he is I believe a sophomore in high school and also taking college courses.
  • 0
Kaiti
Positive bloodwork
Gluten-free since January 2004
Arkansas

Jeremiah 29:11- "For I know the plans that I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for you to prosper and not harm you,plans to give you a hope and future"

"One Nation, Under God"

Feel free to email me anytime....jkbrodbent@yahoo.com

#6 Guest_taweavmo3_*

Guest_taweavmo3_*
  • Guests

Posted 14 September 2005 - 07:39 PM

I homeschooled myself the last two years of high shool, and what surprised me the most was how much I could get accomplished in such a short amount of time. I actually worked full time, saved my money for a trip to Australia after I graduated, and I did all the school work by myself. I was a different person once I got out of public school......I felt a huge weight being lifted off me without the peer pressure. I actually concentrated on learning for the first time in a very long time. I also found college was a breeze, it was pretty much a continuation of what I had already been doing. I've read alot of other homeschooler stories who felt the same way.

Since I enjoyed it so much, I am considering it again for my kids. I've read a ton of books on the topic, and attended a few h/s meetings in our area. I'm lucky in that there seem to be a large number of h/s kids where we live, and there are a gazillion opportunities for socialization, teaching ideas, textbook trading, etc. For me, it would be essential to have a large network of other h/s parents to talk to.

Now I just need to muster up the guts to actually TRY it next year. I am a "by the rules" type of person, so to do something as unconventional as homeschooling is a real challenge for me. My family thinks I'm crazy for even thinking about it, they can't fathom why I wouldn't want to ship their little behinds off to school one after the other! Which, maybe they are right. In three years, I could be home alone all day, sipping my cup of coffee in my quiet house...for eight hours of solitude heaven. I dunno, maybe I can find a part time school, so then I can get my hours of solitude at least twice a week? LOL....good luck in your quest for schooling, it's very daunting!
  • 0

#7 brdbntL

brdbntL

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 63 posts

Posted 15 September 2005 - 06:14 AM

Lucy,
My daughter is type 1 and Celiac. She started Kindergarten August 29th. I was a wreck. She takes her own snack, she was able to have one snack that the rest of the class had (carrots and ranch dressing) and she was so excited (that was the heart breaking thing for me not her). I have a sharpee marker and write the carb count and her name on the bag. But I have to say that the school nurse has been great. We have a notebook that goes back and forth. She calls me with any concerns. And she is absolutly great with me calling for any concerns. Granted it hasn't been that long, but I wanted to share a somewhat positive experience with you.
Laua
  • 0

#8 gfincolorado

gfincolorado

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 16 September 2005 - 05:07 PM

My son is 7 and my daughters are 5 and they all have multiple food allergies, including gluten. We have not been tested for celiac, yet gluten is definitely not an option for my kids. My son went to public school in Kindergarten and I sent his snack everyday, but he was always frustrated that he could not eat what the other kids ate. Not only that, but he has behavior problems when he does eat certain foods and I was still trying to figure everything out back then. That was difficult for his teacher.

For 1st grade we decided to try homeschooling. I was still trying to work out glitches in my childrens' diet. It went really well and my son actually liked it better than public school. With my kids, foods affect not only their behavior, but also their learning. We can move at a pace beneficial to my children and make sure a concept is learned before moving on. People worry about children not being socialized when homeschooled, but it is actually just the opposite. My kids actually have more opportunity to be kids and do activities and meet with people of all different ages. It also provides time to volunteer in the community, which is great experience for anyone.

This year my son is in 2nd grade and my girls are in kindergarten. We have a public school program that is just for homeschoolers 2 days a week in the afternoon. They learn art, music, science and spanish those 2 afternoons. It takes some of the pressure off of me homeschooling, gets them some time in the classroom with different teachers, and also allows them to make more friends and build relationships. Even if you homeschool, the public schools will allow you to come in their classroom for various activities, including extra curricular.

This has been a good balance for our family. The kids love it and it has sure taken the pressure off with the foods. Yes, at church, at school, in activities, anywhere you go you will deal with food issues, yet whatever you choose to do you will adjust to. Don't forget, just because you make one decision now does not mean you can't change your mind down the road. You may choose to homeschool now until you get the food issues under control then choose public schools later.

I do have one suggestion if you choose to homeschool. Get involved in a local support group. It opens up a whole new world for your children, plus gets you the support you need. You would also be amazed the other people that you meet in this support group that also deal with alleries, intolerances and diseases.
  • 0

#9 MySuicidalTurtle

MySuicidalTurtle

    "Like a rolling stone?"

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,663 posts

Posted 16 September 2005 - 07:02 PM

I think it is really up to how your kid is. You could do some home schooling and some not. I am glad to have gone all 12 years in public school.
  • 0

#10 cdford

cdford

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 751 posts

Posted 16 September 2005 - 09:07 PM

You appear to be a Christian. That in itself means only one thing...pray and decide what you do based on what direction God leads. We have homeschooled for 15 years now. It has been a wonderful experience that I would not trade for anything. We knew from day one, however, that it was what our family was called to do. Pray. Research. Do what you are called to do, whichever way that goes.
  • 0
Donna
South Georgia
9 yrs gluten-free
...also DH, fibromyalgia, neuropathy, osteopenia, hypothyroid...

After almost 10 years, I am doing soooo much better!

#11 Guest_Lucy_*

Guest_Lucy_*
  • Guests

Posted 18 September 2005 - 06:06 PM

I am PRAYING, and I feel like homeschooling is the way I want to go, but then I get negative vibes from others. (my husband isn't so sure about it). He is worried about what others will think of us. I would need his support to do it.

I am so glad that some of you that were homeschooled replied. That is who I most want to hear from. People who have been thru it.

Our school doesn't have a nurse (our kids will go to private Christian school if they are not homeschooled.). So the diabetes thing is a big worry as well.

I have two years to think on it, but I would like to start homeschooling my daughter next year if I decide to do it. So I am doing alot of research and love to talk about it with anyone. I am amazed what some people think about it. I havn't seen an unsuccessful homeschool story yet, but poeple (who don't know anyone personnaly who have been homeschooled) sure are negative towards it.

I'll keep praying.
  • 0

#12 Jnkmnky

Jnkmnky

    Bloom where you are planted.

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,350 posts

Posted 18 September 2005 - 06:31 PM

Well, I wouldn't expect people who chose to homeschool to acknowledge the negatives. That's like admitting they made a bad choice. There is a defensive reaction to chosing something that isn't considered "the norm". Sometimes that is manifested in an impossibly perfect description of *reality*. I find the over the top, wonderful stories about how great homeschooling is a little suspect. Nothing's perfect. I did it for a year, but I'm not opposed to *a good* public school, either. Homeschooling wasn't a major ordeal, but I disagree with those who say socializing isn't a big deal when you homeschool. It IS clearly easier to expose your kids to more socializing in a public school. Of course, there's a lot of negatives that go along with some of that "socializing". There are some characters out there. BUUUUT, it's a good way to learn how to deal with those bad kids.... Either choice has good points as well as bad points. As I mentioned in a previous post, my two friends have chosen to homeschool. I'm not against homeschooling, but I don't think it's a cure-all for the negatives of the public school experience. Plus, one more thing -- and this will surely ruffle some feathers-- I have a teaching degree. I don't agree that being a parent is qualification enough to educate children. This may not apply to the younger grades, but it certainly applies to the higher grades...fifth and up. This isn't a debate board, so I won't engage in a heated controversy over my opinion here. I'm just responding to your post. There are negatives to homeschooling. You've clearly begun considering the negatives of public school but to be fair, you should actually go to the school in question, state your concerns and find out how they would address them. Maybe this is all over nothing and you'll find your school is more than happy to address your concerns in a way that totally satisfies you. Most importantly, keep a realistic expectation of homeschooling. You don't want to be overwhelmed by the task simply because you didn't get well-rounded advice on what to expect. I agree with the -pray about it- advice.
  • 0
I believe in God.

#13 Guest_Lucy_*

Guest_Lucy_*
  • Guests

Posted 19 September 2005 - 05:59 AM

Public school is not an option. It would be a Christian elemetry school (with no nurse to treat diabetes) or homeschool.

I know that homeschool can be bad, my sister tried and HATED it. I only want to do what is best, so I'll be taking this year to pray and research it. Thanks so much. I DO appreciate your opinion, because you have tried both.

I have a ? for you. Do you regret homeschooling for that year? Do you feel that your kids suffered doing it for that short of time? I am looking at it from every angle.
  • 0

#14 Kasey'sMom

Kasey'sMom

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 486 posts

Posted 19 September 2005 - 06:13 AM

My dd ia 3 and we're not sure what route we're going take as well. I have met several people in our area that home school. I actually met them through our local co-op. A lot of the people eat like my family. :) We were invited to a toddler playgroup and all the children except one has food issues. The parents met at the library once a month for support and to share ideas and plan events. They also have book fairs, playdates and luches in the park. I was a little unsure about the social aspect but I was suprised to find out that they're very social.

The great thing is their are so many options and each family can find a great fit.
We're going to pray also that we'll be led in the right direction. We are also looking a private shcool as well. :)
  • 0

#15 tarnalberry

tarnalberry

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,542 posts

Posted 19 September 2005 - 06:31 AM

While it might not be an immediate solution, perhaps getting a teaching certification, *then* homeschooling could be an option. It's interesting... I excelled, throughout school, in all subjects. (Yeah, I was the nerdy one who'd be picked on.) And I did a lot of tutoring of my peers in a number of subjects. But I know there's a lot I don't know about how to teach. It's a skill in and of itself, and not always an easy one, from my limited experience with tutoring! (And I know that hardly scratches the surface.) Again, I realize that approach has a number of issues (particularly when it comes to the next few years), but it's an option as well.
  • 0
Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: