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Homeschool


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29 replies to this topic

#16 Jnkmnky

 
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Posted 19 September 2005 - 08:01 AM

Public school is not an option.  It would be a Christian elemetry school (with no nurse to treat diabetes) or homeschool. 

I know that homeschool can be bad,  my sister tried and HATED it.  I only want to do what is best,  so I'll be taking this year to pray and research it.  Thanks so much.  I DO appreciate your opinion,  because you have tried both. 

I have a ?  for you.  Do you regret homeschooling for that year?  Do you feel that your kids suffered doing it for that short of time?  I am looking at it from every angle.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


My kids did well academically for the year we homeschooled. My son was tested the following year and placed in the gifted program. My daugher learned all of her cursive, mulitplication and basic division before third grade. It's fairly easy to teach kids academics in a homeschool environment because of the time you can devote to individual instruction. Once a child understands the instructions, they can't be stopped. We only did school work for three hours a day and played the rest of the day. We had "school" four days a week because I felt that being a mom was what I really wanted to be...not a teacher. I didn't like taking on the role of educator. I have a strong opinion about being a MOM verses being a TEACHER. Maybe because I have a degree in teaching?? I don't know. I prefer being "mom".
I do not think my kids did well socially the year we homeschooled. I know there are loads of things to do, blah, blah, blah... I don't agree that they fit the bill. There are all sorts of exceptions you have to make- ages of these groups can be quite diverse, religious beliefs can be quite extreme, reasons for choosing homeschooling vary and not everyone is doing it for reasons that make sense to me. I did it because the school district we were in was lousy. Education is important to me. Some people have some pretty wacky definitions of "education".
Personally, MY SOCIAL life suffered the year we homeschooled. I was not happy with the folks I was meeting. I thought the parents were weird, the kids were weird and I was thrilled to move back to my old school district and get my kids back into the public school where diversity reigns. My three kids have three different personalities and they are all re-connected with their friends. I have a diverse group of women I chat with again. I think the homeschooling world is a little too limited for MY social needs. I know my kids were unhappy, and I know they're happier being in public school.
It depends on how good your school options are. If we were faced with a lousy public school again, I'd homeschool again. I wouldn't write off homeschooling even with the negatives, but I would base my decision on the educational aspects not the social, or medical needs of my kids. Social and medical issues are easy to work out. Educational shortcomings are non-negotiable. I cannot see sending my kids to school for 6-8 hours a day then supplimenting away my only time with them later in the evening. That's a waste of time and robs us of our time to be a family.

Oh, do I regret it?? I regret that it was the best choice for my kids at that time. I feel that my kids get more out of being in a large, diverse group with a multitude of authority personalities directing them in the skills they were trained to teach. I believe my kids perfer to relate to me as "mom". I prefer to be their mom and not their academic educator. That's my opinion!
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#17 brdbntL

 
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Posted 19 September 2005 - 09:01 AM

Wow Jnkmnky,
That makes me feel a little better. I tried all summer to get my 5 year old to write her name. I didn't want to make it a "thing" so I backed off and I was sure that the I would get calls about how behind she is and so forth. Don't you know that sweetheart came home after the first day of school and had written her name, not once but maybe 3 or 4 times. She did it right away for the teacher. That and similiar experiences with my 6 year old are why at this point I won't homeschool (we are fortunate and live in a good school district). And both of my kids love school.

Lucy I wish you the best with your decision, because it is a hard one. Only you know what is right for you and your children. And I don't know if you have already checked it out, but our Christian book store has an entire section on home school stuff.
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#18 KaitiUSA

 
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Posted 19 September 2005 - 11:19 AM

There are also computer programs for homeschooling. A Christian thing called Switched On Schoolhouse has a pretty good program...it grades everything except projects and essay questions. I would recommend it...I used it in the years I was homeschooled...my mom was not my teacher..the computer was. Anyways, I have tried public, private, and homeschool so I have got a taste of everything. It is really a personal decision and homeschooling may fit some but not others ...it depends on the personalities of the kids and parents as well.
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#19 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 19 September 2005 - 11:37 AM

It is really a personal decision and homeschooling may fit some but not others ...it depends on the personalities of the kids and parents as well.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


It could also be the sort of thing that fits someone at one time, but not at another. Maybe this is a good year for it, maybe it isn't...
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#20 Jnkmnky

 
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Posted 19 September 2005 - 12:02 PM

There's no harm in trying it. You can try homeschooling during summer vacation to see if it's something that works for you. I would recommend the "Making the Grade...Everything your ___ grader needs to know" series. It's published by Barron's and the author is Elena R. Arrigo. I loved the guideline it provided. I purchased all of my other books (and I purchased many) around the themes in the MtG books. Also, some states do NOT require homeschoolers to report the Science and Social Studies content they plan to study. I think that's totally crazy. The book I recommed offers comprehensive content guidelines for both those areas. Thumb through it at Borders if you get a chance. There are tons of options for you in this area. I just prefered this book.
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#21 key

 
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Posted 20 September 2005 - 09:54 AM

I am currently homeschooling my oldest son. He is 6 and he is in Kindergarten. WE are using a program called Abekka. I was SO nervous about it and almost sent him to a Christian school, but then felt I couldn't do it. I had prayed for two years about it, planned, researched, etc. I just really wanted to try it. I felt he was too young to go out and be constantly exposed to negative influences. At least until he had a good Christian foundation. I also felt that he would have more freedom to learn independantly through play, etc. IT has been easier then I thought it would be and much more fun! He loves it and I haven't fought with him once! I also have two other boys that are 3.5 years old and 18 months (my 18month old is my celiac).
There were alot of people negative about homeschooling, but I think it is because they aren't doing it and haven't tried it. Academically my son has done great and it has been about a month. He is already reading 3 and 4 letter words. He is learning so much and I know when he isn't getting something and we spend extra time on that area.
As far as socializing is concerned I agree with what some other people said here. THeir kids are able to carry on conversations with adults and all age groups, not just kids their age.
My son does gymnastics once a week. I do want to get involved in some sort of homeschooling support group. We are working on that. Mainly so we can do field trips with other kids and mom can have support.
Anyway, I don't think you need to have a degree in education to teach your child. There are DVD's, etc. You don't have to commit to it for life and I am sure you can do Kindergarten!
I love it and he is thriving! He is learning responsibilities at home too. He does chores and helps look out for his brothers!
I would love to offer you any help or ideas if you want to chat off this board. I was so nervous to start, but once I got started I really love it.
Good luck and pray alot about it!
Monica
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#22 salexander421

 
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Posted 21 October 2011 - 06:41 PM

We are planning to homeschool our girls. The decision wasn't solely based on their food issues but it did play a small role in it. Our youngest is super sensitive and I really don't see how she could go to public school and not risk cross contamination. Homeschooling is a very personal decision, some people are very passionate about their decision to stay home and school their children while others are very passionate about their children attending public school. To each his own.
Me and my brother were both homeschooled and we did very well. I feel like we've both turned into well rounded adults who are a functioning part of society. The social issue was not a problem for us. We were always around other kids and adults, it's not like we spent all of our time closed up in our home :P I went to public school 2nd-4th grade and absolutely hated it. I was in gifted classes and still got bored. I'm not saying I'm a genius or anything just that public school does not always challenge some children.
For me, I feel like it's my responsibility to teach and guide my children...I'm not sure why that should stop once they reach school age. And as far as qualification, you do not need a degree to teach your children. There are plenty of smart and creative people who do not possess a degree. I read this article recently and thought it was really good "The ten most important things you need to know about homeschooling"
I love number 2 where it says "You are qualified to homeschool your children if you love to read to them, love to spend time with them, love to explore the world with them, love to see them learn new things and, most important, love them."
In the end you just have to do what you feel is best for your children.
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#23 melikamaui

 
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Posted 22 October 2011 - 10:15 AM

We are a homeschool family and love every second of it! In fact, we just got back from a rather spur-of-the-moment camping trip in the middle of the week. (One of my favorite things about homeschooling is the free schedule. You can go whenever and wherever your education may take you!) My kids are very into astronomy, but we live in the city where it is hard to see the stars. An impromptu camping trip in the mountains allowed them to view the stars (we brought along our telescope too) unfettered by the city's light pollution. Then we hiked the nature trails, toured an Arboretum, and generally just had a great time!

There are countless advantages to homeschooling. You won't even realize them all until/unless you are doing it yourself. We began seven years ago and haven't looked back since. By the way, my husband wasn't on board with it at first either. I asked him to give me a year to try it out and he was sold just a few months into it! He is now one of homeschooling's biggest supporters. :D
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#24 mommyto2kids

 
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Posted 22 October 2011 - 11:17 AM

Where we live there 2 public home school options where the kids can home school and a tiny bit of public school all paid for with public school funding, pretty cool. Also we have one charter school that is not allowed to do any holidays at all. Bet they do less food. Check out you options. :)
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#25 domesticactivist

 
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Posted 22 October 2011 - 08:33 PM

My kids are 11 and 12 and have never been to school, aside to visit friends once in kindy! We've been homeschooling all along. It has been a wonderful experience for our family.

In our state, the laws only require registering the year the child turns 7 and testing periodically. In our city, there are many homeschoolers, with a wide range of driving philosophies and socioeconomic circumstances. I've noticed that most of these families seem to be making the choice that is right for them. The best part is that we really do have access to a diverse community of homeschoolers and a lot of options to support our choices.

I started off with a relaxed, "unschooly" approach. We pursued interests together, had play groups, and I "strewed" their path with a lot of different things that might pique their interests. We read together, cooked together, shopped together, etc. As they got a bit older, we dabbled in workbooks, as a fun, optional activity. They got some educational video games to play, and we went to regular park days. When they grew a bit older, they were ready for community center classes, music lessons, community service, and scouting.

Homeschooling is great for dealing with special needs of all kinds. In our family, I never really thought of my kids as special needs. However, it has really stood out to me how lucky we are when I've talked with school parents dealing with the same issues. In the context of school the impact their issues have on their lives is so much more negative.

My son was a late reader. I am so glad we homeschooled with a relaxed approach and knew other kids who were also "late" readers, because I wasn't panicking or making all our focus be on the one thing he couldn't do. Instead, I helped him pursue his interests and do his other academic work by reading it to him. It turned out that when we went gluten-free he suddenly became able to read!!! Both kids' ADD issues and his extreme dyslexia went away in a matter of a couple months. Imagine if he'd been in school all that time, being made to feel dumb for not reading!

My daughter has Tourette's syndrome and struggled with crippling anxiety. When she was 4 the drs told us to put her on anti-anxiety medicine so that she would be able to be left at preschool. We opted not to. Instead, I gave her extra attachment and let her develop at her own pace. She did eventually become ready to be left in group environments without me. Her Tourette's wasn't something we saw as terribly severe - usually her tics don't cause physical pain or major disruption. However, I met another family whose girl's tics were far less severe than my daughter's, and they thought it was a MAJOR problem because of the reaction of fellow students and teachers. The girl would get in trouble for her tics, the kids would make fun of her, and they disrupted the class environment.

Having had to become very careful about our diet, being homeschoolers has been a help there, too. We have much greater control over what foods our kids are exposed to, and we don't have to worry about teachers and administrators not getting it in the same way as school families do. Our kids do go to camps and classes and we do have to send all their own food, talk with the teachers, and take other precautions. We've even had a couple bad experiences. However, the difference is that we are the CUSTOMERS of these camps and classes. We get to leave if it is not working. They actually have a vested interest in meeting our needs. Additionally, the teacher:student ratio is much better and they are not as frazzled and overworked as school teachers tend to be.

Our kids are now "middle school" age and they have a great need to spend time with their peers. Just today my daughter rode the bus to her friend's house, where a group of them spent the day sewing, painting, and crafting elaborate costumes. Both the kids are now enrolled in a home education resource center which offers weekly 1 hour classes in topics taught by parents and community experts. Here is a small sampling of the classes my kids are now/have taken:
- fashion design & redesign
- history through archaeology
- language arts
- folk dancing (including geography)
- graphic design
- LEGO robotics competition
- journalism
- musician's circle

We also have decided to use a curriculum for math and completely love Life of Fred. The author is Christian and we are not, however it is not heavy handed. In fact, it is hilarious.

Even if we didn't live in an area with all these resources, I'm confident we could have a positive experience as a homeschooling family. We've had years where we didn't sign up for a bunch of outside stuff and have done great. Our first homeschooling community was found on-line, there are so many groups with different focuses, there is sure to be one with people you can relate to. We've juggled many life changes, from demanding jobs to unemployment, from married life to divorce, to bringing in a step-parent. All the while we've homeschooled, and have always been able to make it work.

The best part of homeschooling is the connections you can build as a family. My kids actually *like* each other. We spend time together as a family and get to enjoy it, because it's not all about getting homework done in time, getting to practice in time, getting to school on time. Every now and then I ask them if they'd like to try school. They do have some friends who go to school. Some are in mainstream public school, others at charter schools. The answer is always no - they love homeschooling, too.
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Our family is transitioning off the GAPS Intro Diet and into the Full GAPS Diet.
Gluten-Free since November 2010
GAPS Diet since January/February 2011
me - not tested for celiac - currently doing a gluten challenge since 11/26/2011
partner - not tested for celiac
ds - age 11, hospitalized 9/2010, celiac dx by gluten reaction & genetics. No biopsy or blood as we were already gluten-free by the time it was an option.
dd - age 12.5, not celiac, has Tourette's syndome
both kids have now-resolved attention issues.

#26 domesticactivist

 
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Posted 22 October 2011 - 08:59 PM

While it might not be an immediate solution, perhaps getting a teaching certification, *then* homeschooling could be an option. It's interesting... I excelled, throughout school, in all subjects. (Yeah, I was the nerdy one who'd be picked on.) And I did a lot of tutoring of my peers in a number of subjects. But I know there's a lot I don't know about how to teach. It's a skill in and of itself, and not always an easy one, from my limited experience with tutoring! (And I know that hardly scratches the surface.) Again, I realize that approach has a number of issues (particularly when it comes to the next few years), but it's an option as well.


I think any parent who loves their kids, is willing to learn with them, and is not going to completely stress out about the "school" aspect can be a great homeschooling parent. A teaching credential has little to add except maybe confidence. NOONE knows everything their child might need to learn. Kids aren't little vessels to be filled with facts, they are human beings who are exploring the world. Truly great educators don't just impart the knowledge they have... they model and facilitate learning.

My kids seek out mentors in areas I can't help them. They learn research skills by watching and helping me find the answers to questions they have that I can't answer. They
learn problem solving and critical thinking when we work through problems together, and when they struggle through on their own. These are the foundations of a good education, and they don't require a teaching certificate.

Just in case anyone was wondering... I mean no disrespect to teachers, and I do value their profession and their professional credentials. My partner has been a professional tutor and is almost done with her Masters of Arts in Teaching. She is about to start her student teaching and plans to teach high school math, physics, and chemistry. We have many friends who are excellent public school teachers of various grades. One thing is perfectly clear to me, though... the education these teachers received were not the source of their skills in educating others, and are not required for homeschooling.

Here is an interesting article that speaks to the education level of homeschooling parents and the effects on children:
http://whyhomeschool...t-of-socio.html

and the peer reviewed study pdf:
http://www.fraserins...eam 2nd edition

Nice quote:
"Poorly educated parents who choose to teach their children at home produce better academic results for their children than public schools do. One study we reviewed found that students taught at home by mothers who never finished high school scored a full 55 percentage points higher than public school students from families with comparable education levels."
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Our family is transitioning off the GAPS Intro Diet and into the Full GAPS Diet.
Gluten-Free since November 2010
GAPS Diet since January/February 2011
me - not tested for celiac - currently doing a gluten challenge since 11/26/2011
partner - not tested for celiac
ds - age 11, hospitalized 9/2010, celiac dx by gluten reaction & genetics. No biopsy or blood as we were already gluten-free by the time it was an option.
dd - age 12.5, not celiac, has Tourette's syndome
both kids have now-resolved attention issues.

#27 T.H.

 
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Posted 22 October 2011 - 09:38 PM

We've been homeschooling for about 8 years now - started at Kindergarten. I view public schooling like the public bus system. It's great for those who need it, it can really work for some people and give them exactly what they need, and it can be a total disaster for others. It can also be something that we choose to use, or not, simply on desire alone, not necessarily because we think it will work or not work, if that makes sense?

I think for homeschooling to work, it has to work for the whole family, we parents AND the kids. For me and my kids, homeschooling has been something I'm glad we did. If my mother had attempted to homeschool me? We would have murdered each other inside a week. We just don't have the personalities to make it work. ;)

Now, even though I'm happy with what we've done, it hasn't always been easy, especially because both my kids started developing emotional problems with gluten, the few years before diagnosis. But I have enjoyed it more often than not.

There is SO much support for homeschooling right now in most places. Socializing isn't difficult, but it does take, hmmm, thought and a little effort, I guess would be the term. Most towns have at least one homeschooling group (usually more) that meets weekly, which usually has groups and clubs as well. My two groups have a lego club, a PE class, a gal who teaches japanese, another who teaches spanish, a retired math teacher who does upper level math, a gardening club, an acting group that puts on plays once every couple of months, field trips galore - there's lots and lots available. Sometimes the offerings are for a small fee, sometimes it's free, like with our spanish teacher whose son did better in groups, so when she was teaching him her native language, she offered to teach everyone else, too. There's a lot of give and take like that in the community, usually.

One thing I like about the socialization in these groups is the variety of experiences. The kids interact with a variety of ages, so they have to learn more about being helpful to younger kids, and get to see more interaction among older kids who don't exclude them just because they're a year or so younger. There's still rude kids and sweet kids and all that sort of thing, of course - it's just a group of people, so there's a little bit of everything.

For social stuff, there's also scouts, group classes at with the county, sports, choir, church - all sorts of group activities outside the homeschooling community. And I do think having a few of these are important. I've known two homeschooling families in the time I've done this who thought that socialization would just 'happen,' and both their sets of kids were really, really unable to interact with other people. They didn't get much chance to do it.

In a little village, where you have to walk to the village market everyday and play with kids in the street on the way, maybe that would work. In today's society? Not so much.

Educational materials are everywhere, as well. There are curiculums for every type of subject, free lessons on lines for hundreds of subjects, including lessons from a lot of the government websites, national parks, civil war reenactors, PBS, other teachers - it's stunning how much is out there, usually for free, although it takes some research time on mom and dad's part.

Another thing that you find out pretty quickly is that there's not one 'right' way to do it. Just take a look at a few different countries around the world, and you'll start finding numerous different opinions on how to teach, what to teach, and even when to teach it. There's a country in Europe (I believe it's Denmark, but wouldn't swear to that) which doesn't teach the alphabet until the age of 8, for example, although they stress parents reading to kids up until that age more than we do in the USA.

I guess, in the end...it's great if it works for your family. The times I've seen it fail have usually been family dynamics, personalities of the children or adults, or other issues that affect the ability of the child or parent to homeschool.

I know a mother who had MS come on strongly and suddenly, and could no longer homeschool. They sent the kids back to public school. Another mom who HAD to do everything just like the school, with lessons at the desk and worksheets and such, and her child was one who learned best doing it in a completely different way. They ended up finding an alternative school where the child could learn the way he needed, and the mother didn't lose her mind trying to teach that way. :)

Since I've been doing it, we've shifted how we homeschool a number of times, as we've learned more and as the kids have grown. Recently, we've had to cope with homeschooling when the kids and I are healthy, as my daughter gets very ill when she's glutened, and my son has memory and retention issues from the same problem. Not real conducive to any learning, as you can imagine!

If you're curious about checking out some sites that have a lot of links to homeschooling stuff, feel free to send me a message. I can pass 'em along so you can check it out some more, see if it seems like it would be interesting to you, or really not your cup of tea. :-)
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T.H.

Gluten free since August 10, 2009.
21 years with undiagnosed Celiac Disease

23 years with undiagnosed sulfite sensitivity

25 years with undiagnosed mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) 

 

Daughter: celiac and MCAD positive

Son: gluten intolerant
Father, brother: celiac positive


#28 thegirlsmom

 
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Posted 23 October 2011 - 04:17 AM

Well, I wouldn't expect people who chose to homeschool to acknowledge the negatives. That's like admitting they made a bad choice. There is a defensive reaction to chosing something that isn't considered "the norm". Sometimes that is manifested in an impossibly perfect description of *reality*. I find the over the top, wonderful stories about how great homeschooling is a little suspect. Nothing's perfect. I did it for a year, but I'm not opposed to *a good* public school, either. Homeschooling wasn't a major ordeal, but I disagree with those who say socializing isn't a big deal when you homeschool. It IS clearly easier to expose your kids to more socializing in a public school. Of course, there's a lot of negatives that go along with some of that "socializing". There are some characters out there. BUUUUT, it's a good way to learn how to deal with those bad kids.... Either choice has good points as well as bad points. As I mentioned in a previous post, my two friends have chosen to homeschool. I'm not against homeschooling, but I don't think it's a cure-all for the negatives of the public school experience. Plus, one more thing -- and this will surely ruffle some feathers-- I have a teaching degree. I don't agree that being a parent is qualification enough to educate children. This may not apply to the younger grades, but it certainly applies to the higher grades...fifth and up. This isn't a debate board, so I won't engage in a heated controversy over my opinion here. I'm just responding to your post. There are negatives to homeschooling. You've clearly begun considering the negatives of public school but to be fair, you should actually go to the school in question, state your concerns and find out how they would address them. Maybe this is all over nothing and you'll find your school is more than happy to address your concerns in a way that totally satisfies you. Most importantly, keep a realistic expectation of homeschooling. You don't want to be overwhelmed by the task simply because you didn't get well-rounded advice on what to expect. I agree with the -pray about it- advice.



I agree with what you are saying here. I am kind of an odd duck in that I was homeschooled for 9 years myself, went to school, got a teaching degree, and now homeschool my kids. I have no problems telling you some of the problems that I have had with homeschooling.
My children are 11, 8, 6, and 4. I will start by saying that your experience will depend on your personality, the child's personality and how he will respond to your instruction. Some children will butt heads with mom and "schooling" will become a battle of the wills. That said, children need to learn to respect their parents and this battle will take place one way or another even if it means they wait till they are going through their teen years.
As a homeschooler myself adults were always amazed at me and my sisters maturity, ability to have relationships outside my grade, and our confidence.
I was sheltered. I hated when schooled friends told me that but I admit it now. I had a basic Christian knowledge of sex, drugs, alcohol etc. but my group of friends and I had no desire to experiment with it. I was shocked when I did my student teaching to see that young children today now know more about sex than I did - till I got married!
Now for the negatives? I think the first couple years - teaching the child to read, write, and basic math is the hardest. I have learned to lower my expectation, be more relaxed so that my children can learn at their own speed(I am not an unschooler though and my children do meet the state standards for their grade) I struggle with meeting each child where they are and challenging them to grow at their level. I have one gifted child, one Learning disabled, one normal, and one 4 year old who wants to learn to read and is working on it.
It does take more work for socialization but it can be done.
It can be hard to be the only person responsible for the child's education. Sometimes I wish my kids could go home and have a different perspective on a problem instead of it all being me.
To do it right, it is a full time job. At least it is for me. It wasn't when I only had 1 kid. Everyday I look back and wonder were my day went. You have to work really hard to have time for yourself, and I have recently concluded, the kids need more chores :)
Expect your house to be messy. The kids are always home and if your kids are small and don't pick up after themselves........and honestly after school I often don't want to follow through with the kids and the house(I am getting better).
Those are the biggies for me. I love homeschooling. I watch my 11yr working exponents, my 8 yr old solving reading adult books, and my 6 yr old discussing anatomy and I think.....I taught them this! I love going outside and having bike races and doing math with sidewalk chalk. And I am learning, that my kids are just cool and I want to spend as much of their childhood with them as I can.
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#29 domesticactivist

 
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Posted 23 October 2011 - 09:32 AM

I agree it's not all roses and chocolates - but no parenting style is. Good parenting is rewarding but hard work whether the kids are in school or not!

Some children will butt heads with mom and "schooling" will become a battle of the wills. That said, children need to learn to respect their parents and this battle will take place one way or another even if it means they wait till they are going through their teen years.


I think it's really true that each child has a different personality and each parent has a certain personality and sometimes those things are more compatible than others. It was very difficult for me when the kids were smaller and my son was very extroverted and my daughter had extreme social anxiety. Balancing those differences with my need for adult interaction was very difficult. However, those things would have been issues no matter what school choice we made.

I don't think homeschooling has to become a battle of the wills. Some kids are more headstrong that others, but we are the adults. We have a greater capacity for getting perspective on the situation and modifying our personal style to be compatible with our children's. Children do need to respect their parents, just as their parents hopefully show respect for all people, including their children. My observation is that when I find myself in a power struggle I can usually see in hindsight where I've misstepped to set myself up for that. I'm not one of those people who lets their kids do everything they want, but I also pick my battles, and try to approach them in the way most likely to work to my advantage. Since I haven't thrown down arbitrary rules all over the place, the ones I care about are easier for me to stick by.

As a homeschooler myself adults were always amazed at me and my sisters maturity, ability to have relationships outside my grade, and our confidence.


This is one that comes up a lot - and it is true for many homeschooled kids. I almost made a comment about this in my previous post but now I want to. It hasn't been my experience that my kids are more mature or socially more confident than school kids. I do know homeschool kids who are, and I do know homeschool kids who are socially inept. I think you find the same variety among school kids, though homeschool kids often have more ability to practice those skills with adults. What I do notice is that my kids and most other homeschoolers we know are much nicer to younger kids and much more able to see adults as people rather than just authority figures to be bucked.

Now for the negatives? I think the first couple years - teaching the child to read, write, and basic math is the hardest. I have learned to lower my expectation, be more relaxed so that my children can learn at their own speed(I am not an unschooler though and my children do meet the state standards for their grade) I struggle with meeting each child where they are and challenging them to grow at their level. I have one gifted child, one Learning disabled, one normal, and one 4 year old who wants to learn to read and is working on it.

I think that relaxation and meeting kids where they are is key to the whole process :)

It can be hard to be the only person responsible for the child's education. Sometimes I wish my kids could go home and have a different perspective on a problem instead of it all being me.

I really don't see myself as the only person responsible for the kids' education. We have friends and other family members, as well as community mentors who we can turn to if we are stuck.


To do it right, it is a full time job. At least it is for me. It wasn't when I only had 1 kid. Everyday I look back and wonder were my day went. You have to work really hard to have time for yourself, and I have recently concluded, the kids need more chores :)
Expect your house to be messy. The kids are always home and if your kids are small and don't pick up after themselves........

So true!!! It is a full time job but that doesn't mean sitting at the kitchen table with workbooks all day every day. It means you are interacting with your kids, always bringing things in, finding things to do, facilitating lessons. I have worked part time and full time and I have been a stay at home mom, and I've got to say it's possible in any case but there are things that will slide. I've had years where the school part of homeschooling mostly dropped out and years where my work seriously suffered.

Since we are home so much and our house is small it has been hard to keep it clean, and I only have two kids. We also have all that "educational" stuff hanging around, projects in process, and all that. Since the kids are home more, though, they can also have more responsibility around the house. As they get older this gets easier and easier.
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Our family is transitioning off the GAPS Intro Diet and into the Full GAPS Diet.
Gluten-Free since November 2010
GAPS Diet since January/February 2011
me - not tested for celiac - currently doing a gluten challenge since 11/26/2011
partner - not tested for celiac
ds - age 11, hospitalized 9/2010, celiac dx by gluten reaction & genetics. No biopsy or blood as we were already gluten-free by the time it was an option.
dd - age 12.5, not celiac, has Tourette's syndome
both kids have now-resolved attention issues.

#30 Familytradition

 
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Posted 25 October 2011 - 01:49 PM

Well I am new here but we also homeschool and LOVE IT! I have a ton of reasons why we choose this path but most of them have been expressed by previous posters. :). We are dealing with multiple life threatening food allergies, celiac, autism, apraxia of speech, expressive language disorder and sensory processing disorder but we are THRIVING! I can't imagine it any other way and neither can my boys. The best part so far (our first year) is that I can take immediate action if my son is struggling with something. We can keep at it until he is ready to move on.
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