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What To Do For Breakfast?
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I have been gluten free for a few months and I feel a lot better. I have been so successful at adjusting my diet and lifestyle that I don't miss gluten foods very much anymore. However I am failing at breakfast, many mornings I just sit and try to think of something to eat then give up. What do you all do for breakfast?

Here is my situation:

- I don't have much money, so prepared gluten free foods seem to be out of reach because they are too expensive for me. Please don't tell me they aren't expensive unless you can feed yourself on less than $10 a day (but if you know some cheap stuff that I can get that would be awesome).

- I don't have much time, meaning if it takes more than 10 minutes I will usually just skip breakfast.

- I am getting in shape, so I need high protein and low fats. The second best thing about going gluten-free is I have been losing weight, but I have also been working out and I need a lot of protein and energy.

- I am now also lactose intolerant :(

- Food tasting great is preferred but not necessary. As long as it isn't gross and it meets my needs my mouth might not enjoy it but my mind and body will!

- I am already eating too much rice and corn, and too many eggs which is not healthy.

Before I would just have cereal with milk or sometimes oatmeal. Almond milk has a bad fat to protein ratio and Chex (or an gluten-free cereal) with soy milk is totally disgusting. Sometimes I just drink some soy milk, but I heard it isn't good for a guy to have too much soy because of some plant estrogen stuff in soy. Corn grits seem like empty calories. So far the best options have been BRM Mighty Tasty Hot Cereal and BRM gluten-free pancake mix but these are low in protein and do take a little time to prepare. Anybody found an easy, fast and cheap alternative to milk and cereal?

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Try this thread :

Also, breakfast can be anything from hard boiled eggs you made two days ago to left- overs from dinner

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I am on the paleo diet (which is grain free and diary free) and I will eat just about anything for breakfast including meat and vegetables (aye I know lol...). I moved away from traditional breakfast foods when I changed my diet.

For something closer to tradition though I often eat some nuts, berries and a couple of poached/boiled/scrambled or fried eggs etc (depending on which I prefer at the time).

Or, if I am not feeling very hungry some macadamia nuts and a banana does the trick...

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Try this thread :

Also, breakfast can be anything from hard boiled eggs you made two days ago to left- overs from dinner

Thanks for the link! I am making my way through it. This morning I had leftover ground turkey and vegetable fried rice from yesterday, it was awesome for lunch but stir-fried rice for breakfast is just wrong, my stomach wasn't super happy with that.

I think I am going to have to incorporate some meat, and do some planning and preparation the day before. This is the worst part for me, I am more of an eat to live person (instead of live to eat) and having to spend so much time, energy and thought on food bothers me. But it also means I am eating a lot healthier in many different ways, so it really is worth it anyway, even without the gluten issue.

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Thanks for the link! I am making my way through it. This morning I had leftover ground turkey and vegetable fried rice from yesterday, it was awesome for lunch but stir-fried rice for breakfast is just wrong, my stomach wasn't super happy with that.

I think I am going to have to incorporate some meat, and do some planning and preparation the day before. This is the worst part for me, I am more of an eat to live person (instead of live to eat) and having to spend so much time, energy and thought on food bothers me. But it also means I am eating a lot healthier in many different ways, so it really is worth it anyway, even without the gluten issue.

My son's friend from Vietnam eats fried rice often for breakfast. They take leftover plain rice and throw it in a pan and scramble in some eggs.

I buy turkey or chicken spinach sausages and cook them all. Then freeze them. They need 1-2 minutes in the microwave to defrost. Grilled cheese? PB sandwich or toast?

I make these and freeze:

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I am on the paleo diet (which is grain free and diary free) and I will eat just about anything for breakfast including meat and vegetables (aye I know lol...). I moved away from traditional breakfast foods when I changed my diet.

For something closer to tradition though I often eat some nuts, berries and a couple of poached/boiled/scrambled or fried eggs etc (depending on which I prefer at the time).

Or, if I am not feeling very hungry some macadamia nuts and a banana does the trick...

Yea, there was a time when I was gravitating towards nuts, but they all have a ridiculous fat to protein ratio, like 2 grams of fat for every gram of protein. That's a lot. That paleo diet is interesting, seems like a really high fat diet though. I'll have to research it a little.

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My son's friend from Vietnam eats fried rice often for breakfast. They take leftover plain rice and throw it in a pan and scramble in some eggs.

I buy turkey or spinach sausages and cook them all. Then freeze them. They need 1-2 minutes in the microwave to defrost. Grilled cheese? PB sandwich or toast?

I make these and freeze:

Ooooh, that's what I need! That recipe you gave me the link for. I can make that once or twice a week, and just nuke them in the morning. I'll substitute out the milk.

I have generally been avoiding all types of breads, even gluten-free bread. It's like I had this really deep relationship, but then things changed, she wasn't who I thought she was. She would have wild mood swings, flirting with me then torturing me. She was so bad for me, but so beautiful. I couldn't live without her but I felt miserable when I was with her. Things got worse and worse, she was keeping secrets, using me, taking all my energy and giving nothing back. Finally I had to break it off. I will heal, and be ready to open up again, but I need time and space. Gluten, you broke my heart.

So anyway, now I am learning to cook for myself, and I am eating mostly Asian food (there is NO metaphor here, the metaphor has ended), much of which is naturally gluten free if you use gluten-free soy sauce and avoid dumplings and wheat noodles. It's weird, you can't really eat anything from an Asian restaurant, but you can eat almost everything on the menu if you make it yourself. Anyway, it takes time to adapt to an Asian diet, I wouldn't be surprised if there was a genetic component. It's usually great, but I get sick of rice, and that is what they usually have for breakfast, some sort of rice product (or noodles).

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Yea, there was a time when I was gravitating towards nuts, but they all have a ridiculous fat to protein ratio, like 2 grams of fat for every gram of protein. That's a lot. That paleo diet is interesting, seems like a really high fat diet though. I'll have to research it a little.

Yes the theory with the paleo people is that it is grains and excessive carbs that do the most damage and not fat. Although some forms of paleo can be higher in carbs there is also the low carb version, so the fat is vital for energy. It's not atkins though, people tend to confuse them.

Also legumes are off the menu as is dairy (if you are hardcore paleo which I am these days). So no processed foods, no dairy, no grains (at all...none, zero, zilch), no legumes.

Meat, fish (types low in methylmercury although that is not specified it is my personal preference), nuts, eggs, vegetables and fruit...basically lol

As for beverages I just drink mineral water myself but paleo does allow coffee etc and some versions even slide in soda pops. I don't as I don't add any sugar to anything or use artificial sweetener as a replacement.

It has gotten me results in that I am not completely bed bound any more and my digestive system is much improved but I am still getting some symptoms that have not worn off yet...I wait patiently as I have only been on it for 2 months (1 month higher carb and 1 month lower carb), so it is still early days and I was feeling rather horribly ill when I started so it may well take time to heal properly.

I have lost 17lbs though (I am overweight), which is a good thing in my case!

Edited by Fairy Dancer
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You said you're lactose intolerant, so what about lactose-free milk? Unless you actually have a milk protein intolerance, like many of us. I wouldn't be so quick to rule out almond milk, since you're already needing to rule out gluten and dairy(?). Almond milk (and nuts in general) are good fats, and fat in moderation is not necessarily a bad thing (according to paleo, it's actually a good thing and nutritionally invaluable). Almond mlk is also a great source of calcium and is fortified with Vit D, both of which you need to work harder to get without dairy.

I'm not sure if quinoa is too expensive for you, but you could also do a small serving of that in the mornings. It's high in protein AND iron.

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You said you're lactose intolerant, so what about lactose-free milk? Unless you actually have a milk protein intolerance, like many of us. I wouldn't be so quick to rule out almond milk, since you're already needing to rule out gluten and dairy(?). Almond milk (and nuts in general) are good fats, and fat in moderation is not necessarily a bad thing (according to paleo, it's actually a good thing and nutritionally invaluable). Almond mlk is also a great source of calcium and is fortified with Vit D, both of which you need to work harder to get without dairy.

I'm not sure if quinoa is too expensive for you, but you could also do a small serving of that in the mornings. It's high in protein AND iron.

Thanks, quinoa is a good idea, I've never cooked it before, but I should be able to cook it and eat it later right? It is a little expensive, but I think I've seen it cheap at some store around where I live. Yes, I was using lactose free milk for a while, but I kept feeling bad after I drank it, so I am trying to avoid all milk products including cheese, I do think I might have a milk protein issue. I react badly to Pamela's gluten free pancake mix, I discovered it has cultured buttermilk in it which should be low lactose but it still causes me problems. I guess you are right about almond milk. It certainly tastes better with cereal than soy milk. But it doesn't give me enough protein. I guess I should keep some around for occasional cereal. The best thing about nondairy milk is that it has such a long shelf life! I can drink it slowly and not worry about it going bad.

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Mash a banana, an egg and 2 tbsp peanut butter and you have pancake batter (really- sounds gross, I know!) Takes about 30 seconds to mash, about 3-4 to fry it into pancakes. Quite tasty.

I know you are leary of the fat in nuts, but the fat in natural peanut or almond butter is very beneficial for your heart and can actually aid in weight loss. I do a semi-primal diet and it has helped me as well.

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Mash a banana, an egg and 2 tbsp peanut butter and you have pancake batter (really- sounds gross, I know!) Takes about 30 seconds to mash, about 3-4 to fry it into pancakes. Quite tasty.

I know you are leary of the fat in nuts, but the fat in natural peanut or almond butter is very beneficial for your heart and can actually aid in weight loss. I do a semi-primal diet and it has helped me as well.

Wow, I have got to give that a try. Unfortunately, I'm also allergic to bananas, yay! So gluten, milk, bananas are all out for me, and I think there is something else that I haven't pinned down yet. Sometimes my lips itch a lot and take a few days to heal, and I think it might be some weird symptom of a food allergy. The last two times that it happened I had previously been eating edamame, and if it turns out I am even mildly allergic to soy I am going to a-splode!

But your recipe sounds fun, so I am going to try it and feed it to someone else. If it works out maybe I'll be able to think of some sort of substitute for the banana.

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I am betting you could use butternut squash as a banana substitute- or pumpkin. Both have a similar texture and just a bit of sweetness, and I know people have used them in pancakes.

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I am betting you could use butternut squash as a banana substitute- or pumpkin. Both have a similar texture and just a bit of sweetness, and I know people have used them in pancakes.

That's a great idea, I will let you know how it works out!

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Ok, more stuff to read. Making big batches of food and freezing small portionhs on the weekend can save you lots of time.

Some starting the gluten-free diet tips for the first 6 months:

Get tested before starting the gluten-free diet.

Don't eat in restaurants

Eat only whole foods not processed foods.

Eat only food you cook yourself, think simple foods, not gourmet meals.

Take probiotics.

Take digestive enzymes.

Avoid dairy.

Avoid sugars and starchy foods.

Avoid alcohol.

Some threads with good info:

FAQ Celiac com

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/forum-7/announcement-3-frequently-asked-questions-about-celiac-disease/

Celiac Newbie Info 101

What's For Breakfast Today?

What Did You Have For Lunch Today?

What Are You Cooking Tonight?

Easy yummy bread in minutes

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That's a great idea, I will let you know how it works out!

Phyller, try reading a few articles about the properties of dietary fat, it's role in weight loss, and how it is necessary for the digestion of a number of vital nutrients. I convinced my mother to quit living on salad and chicken and she dropped twenty pounds in one year with no other changes.

An article about Weston Price, a dentist who traveled the world in the early 1900's studying traditional ethnic diets:

http://www.westonaprice.org/nutrition-greats/weston-price

An article about traditional ethnic diets all over the world:

http://www.westonaprice.org/basics/characteristics-of-traditional-diets

Fairly well written article about the history of the demonization of fat:

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/saturated-fat-healthy/#axzz1ypot7ZAe

And I just realized that this stuff is probably rather a polarizing issue, so let me just say I'm not trying to start a flame war, just hoping for an honest, open minded look at nutrition.

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Phyller, try reading a few articles about the properties of dietary fat, it's role in weight loss, and how it is necessary for the digestion of a number of vital nutrients. I convinced my mother to quit living on salad and chicken and she dropped twenty pounds in one year with no other changes.

An article about Weston Price, a dentist who traveled the world in the early 1900's studying traditional ethnic diets:

http://www.westonaprice.org/nutrition-greats/weston-price

An article about traditional ethnic diets all over the world:

http://www.westonaprice.org/basics/characteristics-of-traditional-diets

Fairly well written article about the history of the demonization of fat:

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/saturated-fat-healthy/#axzz1ypot7ZAe

And I just realized that this stuff is probably rather a polarizing issue, so let me just say I'm not trying to start a flame war, just hoping for an honest, open minded look at nutrition.

Don't worry, I for one am not going to get involved in a saturated vs. unsaturated fat debate. I studied Molecular Biology in college and I remember just enough physiology to be dangerous. I would warn you that the fundamental argument of the paleo diet also works against you. It says we are genetically programmed to deal with saturated fats, right? Two problems 1)You better be physically active. If you are out hauling rocks for a living I think you can eat whatever you want, you need dense calorie sources. But if you work at a computer you better be more careful about what you eat. 2)We don't all have the same genes when it comes to dealing with fat. Some people have high cholesterol and others don't even though they have the same diet, some get heart disease and some don't. Those tribes that have a high fat diet also have a particular set of genes, just like Northern Europeans can digest milk better than most other people groups. Any Inuit that wasn't genetically capable of living for a few months on whale blubber exited the gene pool quite a while ago. So what is healthy for you? I think what makes good nutrition for each person depends on a combination of genetics and lifestyle, in short it is at least a little different for everyone.

So I'm not completely eliminating fat from my diet, I am just trying to maximize nutrition while minimizing calories. While I'm exercising or just going through my day my body is burning up some fat to provide a portion of the energy I need. Now from that perspective, every ounce of fat I eat is an ounce of fat that my body is going to burn from food intake instead of taking out of my fat reserve. I'd rather burn the saturated fat in my body than the saturated fat in the bacon I just ate. So if I don't eat too many carbs (which could be stored as fat) and I eat less fat than I burn, I am guaranteed to lose weight. At the same time I am trying to build muscle and some days I lift weights. My muscles are really hungry for protein (and also carbs and even some fat). Protein is a building block but not a good source of energy, so your body is unlikely to turn it into fat. So my basic diet is maximize protein, keep carbs at a reasonable level, and minimize fat. Add moderate weightlifting and some good cardio workouts like running, and I am going to be losing weight AND building muscle. That's been my gameplan since I quit gluten about 3 months ago and I have lost about 20 pounds and I am about 25% stronger, so it is working okay for me. There are other ways to lose weight, I see this as a safe way that works for me.

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Ok, more stuff to read. Making big batches of food and freezing small portionhs on the weekend can save you lots of time.

Some starting the gluten-free diet tips for the first 6 months:

Get tested before starting the gluten-free diet.

Don't eat in restaurants

Eat only whole foods not processed foods.

Eat only food you cook yourself, think simple foods, not gourmet meals.

Take probiotics.

Take digestive enzymes.

Avoid dairy.

Avoid sugars and starchy foods.

Avoid alcohol.

Some threads with good info:

FAQ Celiac com

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/forum-7/announcement-3-frequently-asked-questions-about-celiac-disease/

Celiac Newbie Info 101

What's For Breakfast Today?

What Did You Have For Lunch Today?

What Are You Cooking Tonight?

Easy yummy bread in minutes

Thanks, awesome advice! I've already experienced that a lot of your tips are true. Like "don't eat in restaurants". Period. I cook almost everything I eat now. I never tried probiotics, I am going to have to do that.

You all have been so helpful, thanks everyone!

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I am able to tolerate oatmeal. I also will make grits, buckwheat, or quinoa for breakfast from time to time. If you have a waffle iron, gluten-free waffles are pretty easy to make, and you can freeze them easily. Warm them up in a DEDICATED gluten-free toaster, though! The same recipe for waffles can also be slightly modified for muffins - just add some sugar, nuts, berries, dried fruit, whatever, and bake them in cupcake shells. These also freeze well and can be warmed up in a microwave. I also make it a point to keep plenty of fresh fruit on hand for when I need to grab something on the run.

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I am able to tolerate oatmeal. I also will make grits, buckwheat, or quinoa for breakfast from time to time. If you have a waffle iron, gluten-free waffles are pretty easy to make, and you can freeze them easily. Warm them up in a DEDICATED gluten-free toaster, though! The same recipe for waffles can also be slightly modified for muffins - just add some sugar, nuts, berries, dried fruit, whatever, and bake them in cupcake shells. These also freeze well and can be warmed up in a microwave. I also make it a point to keep plenty of fresh fruit on hand for when I need to grab something on the run.

Quinoa is actually easy if you have a crockpot, I prefer it in a sweet preparation. I'll cook it with cinnamon, sliced apples and a bit of honey, I don't usually like it in savory preparations. Pecans would probably go good with it. I recently found a 4lb bag of organic quinoa from Earthy Choice at Costco for 9$!!!!! Whoohoo!

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Rice cakes with peanut butter is often my breakfast at work.

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