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Reintroduce Dairy? - Casein Intolerant
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8 posts in this topic

Any thoughts/opinions would be helpful.

I have been gluten/dairy/soy free for 6 years. Enterolab test came back positive for gluten intolerance and celiac/gluten intolerant genes. Also tested high for casein intolerance 34 (should be less than 10). I am allergic, carry an epi pen for soy.

I have been thinking lately about reintroducing dairy into my diet though I have mixed feelings about it.

I was surprised when the test results came back positive for casein intolerance. I knew I was lactose intolerant, but never had any other issues with it.

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Just curious as to why you would want to reintroduce something to your body that you know you are intolerant of?

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Any thoughts/opinions would be helpful.

I have been gluten/dairy/soy free for 6 years. Enterolab test came back positive for gluten intolerance and celiac/gluten intolerant genes. Also tested high for casein intolerance 34 (should be less than 10). I am allergic, carry an epi pen for soy.

I have been thinking lately about reintroducing dairy into my diet though I have mixed feelings about it.

I was surprised when the test results came back positive for casein intolerance. I knew I was lactose intolerant, but never had any other issues with it.

Why are you mulling over the idea of reintroducing dairy into your diet? What are your thoughts on how would it benefit your health?

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If it were me I would stick to A2 milk only. Depending on where you are, it may be easy or difficult to find A2-only milk as almost all of our milk today contains both A1 and A2 forms of beta-casein. A1 beta casein has a structure that allows the release of opiods which may be the culprit behind your casein intolerance.

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I am intolerant to casein. I was in the past. Then according to testing, I wasn't. The Dr. warned me not to eat any just because of how severe my symptoms had been. But did I listen? No. At first it wasn't a problem.

Then I noticed that if I got the nachos at Target, I couldn't make it through the store even for a quick shopping trip. The big D would strike. And did I listen to my body? No. Kept on eating it.

Eventually I was eating less and less of it and it got to the point where I was actually kind of repulsed by it. And now I know for sure. I can't have it. Not now anyway.

If you are going to re-introduce it, I would do it at home and just once to begin with. Then wait a week to try it again, assuming you get no reaction. Of course if there is a reaction do not have it again.

Then if you find that there is no reaction, have it once in a while. Don't overdo it like I did.

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I was wondering this same about myself.

Last time I consumed some casein, I got small red itchy bumps on my arm for about an hour and then they went away. Does this kind of reaction mean I should stay away from casein forever or is it such a minor reaction that I shouldn't worry about it? In other words, is it doing some kind of damage to my body?

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Is your 34 enterolab casein score a recent test or from 6 years ago before you went GFCFSF? If a recent test, then I would wonder why my casein antibodies were still high after 6 years dairy free. I would also continue to avoid dairy, IMHO.

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Is your 34 enterolab casein score a recent test or from 6 years ago before you went GFCFSF? If a recent test, then I would wonder why my casein antibodies were still high after 6 years dairy free. I would also continue to avoid dairy, IMHO.

I can't seem to get the Enterolab's website to load. :(

Last year my gastroenterologist did the blood test for Celiacs. It came back negative. I found out my grandmother had the same thing happen, but her doctor didn't stop at the blood test. She got scoped and had significant intestinal damage. Diagnosis: Celiacs. Her sister had been diagnosed a number of years prior. I cut gluten from my diet and I felt LOADS better. I had gotten to the point that I had one "normal" meal every four days. The days in between I felt horrid, bloated, and nauseous, and so only ate very small amounts. I realized that even gluten-free dairy triggered a gluten-like reaction (less severe). I cut all dairy out and found marked improvement. Potatoes trigger a gluten-like reaction, although I can tolerate potato flour/starch/sugar as long as it isn't in the top 3-5 ingredients. I also seem to have problems with avocados. They contain high levels of salycilates and caused the same horrid cramping that happened the one time I took aspirin. I'm fine with gluten-free oats, but have to watch how much corn I eat (more of a bloating issue than a full-blown gluten-like rxn). I'm HIGHLY sensitive. Even a small amount of cross-contamination can set me off. I've been gluten-free (sans accidental glutenation events) for over a year and dairy free for nearly one year. All of my three children exhibit gluten sensitivity in varying degrees.

I'd like to find out how much the tests run, as there doesn't seem to be any local doctor who specializes in Celiacs. My gastroenterologist told me I had IBS and I needed to eat more fiber. *sigh* I'd like to make sure I've eliminated all the foods I need to avoid and figure out if it really is the casein I have issues with. It probably is, but I'd like to make sure. I'd read that it was quite possible that gluten from grains crosses into cow's milk and that could be a culprit.

Has anyone w/milk issues tried dairy from grass-fed cows? Did it make a difference? Has anyone tried the A2 milk? Where is that sold in the USA?

Considering how sick I can become, I don't want to try it without having first checked for casein intolerance.

How can I get a hold of EnteroLab?

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