Jump to content





   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Sprouting, And Raw Vs. Cooked


  • Please log in to reply

5 replies to this topic

#1 HauntedEyes

 
HauntedEyes

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 12 posts
 

Posted 02 July 2012 - 09:25 AM

I was wondering about sprouting my legumes and my allowable grains, since they are supposed to be more nutritious and have enzymes we need. Supplementing with enzymes will be hard for me, since many have soy, corn or rice ingredients, which I have to avoid for a time. From those who have been celiac or gluten intolerant for a longer time and do sprout, from your experience are the sprouted foods (raw and/or cooked) easier on your gut, or would they be too harsh until things are healed up?

And I know there's more nutrition in the veggies if you eat raw, but is raw too harsh for one new to cutting out glutens and other food sensitivities?

Since I am going to have to drastically cut what I can eat, I want to get the most "bang for the buck" nutrition-wise from the food I do eat.
  • 0
gluten-free since 04/30/12
IgA antibodies to gliadin, casein, soy, egg, corn, rice, nightshades, beef, chicken, tuna, and pork.

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 ravenwoodglass

 
ravenwoodglass

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,741 posts
 

Posted 02 July 2012 - 11:47 AM

Cooked are going to be easier to digest for a bit until you heal. I can't answer about the sprouts since I don't consume them but for a pill free enzyme boost I understand pineapple if you like contains some natural enzymes that will help with digestion.
  • 0
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#3 HauntedEyes

 
HauntedEyes

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 12 posts
 

Posted 05 July 2012 - 10:34 AM

I did have some enzymes, even some papaya enzymes, but trashed them last week because they contained either corn, rice or soy, which I cannot have. The reason I am wanting to sprout is to get more nutritional value because I do have to vastly restrict my diet right now and even a lot of supplements contain ingredients I cannot eat right now. Sprouted beans are supposed to be easier to digets and have more nutrition than the cooked dry beans.
  • 0
gluten-free since 04/30/12
IgA antibodies to gliadin, casein, soy, egg, corn, rice, nightshades, beef, chicken, tuna, and pork.

#4 Skylark

 
Skylark

    Glutenologist

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,490 posts
 

Posted 05 July 2012 - 11:39 AM

I love sprouted legumes. I do find them easier to digest. I just bought some brown rice to experiment with sprouting it.

Eat your veggies the way they agree with your best. The raw foods movement is a pretty recent fad and raw vegetables are not necessarily better for you. For example, cooking inactivates thyroid toxins in cruciferous vegetables and lowers alkaloid levels in nightshades. In Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurvada, the oldest medical systems, you usually cook your food.
  • 0

#5 BeccaMeadows

 
BeccaMeadows

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 23 posts
 

Posted 05 July 2012 - 11:56 AM

If you're worried about digestion it would help to liquify your food. Making juices or smoothies with the fruits and vegetables from your fridge or freezer. Cooked foods in general are bad for you in larger dosages. Try eating at least 51% raw foods. Not only does heating it destroy nutrients (heat denatures proteins) but it has been proven that when you eat more than 51% cooked foods your body has an immune response causing a rise in white blood cell count and digestive leukocytosis. Having roughage like cellulose will help clean your system and help any blockages. Taking a supplement called UC3J really helped me with blockages as well.
Hope it helps and the best of luck to you.
  • 0

#6 Skylark

 
Skylark

    Glutenologist

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,490 posts
 

Posted 05 July 2012 - 01:01 PM

If you're worried about digestion it would help to liquify your food. Making juices or smoothies with the fruits and vegetables from your fridge or freezer. Cooked foods in general are bad for you in larger dosages. Try eating at least 51% raw foods. Not only does heating it destroy nutrients (heat denatures proteins) but it has been proven that when you eat more than 51% cooked foods your body has an immune response causing a rise in white blood cell count and digestive leukocytosis. Having roughage like cellulose will help clean your system and help any blockages. Taking a supplement called UC3J really helped me with blockages as well.
Hope it helps and the best of luck to you.

I hate to tell you this, but so-called "digestive leucocytosis" is part of the fad raw foods stuff I was referring to. Didn't that 51% "magic number" ever strike you as suspicious? All of that pseudoscience is a result of wild over-interpretation of two papers published in the 1930s that have never been reproduced. It's sort of like that telephone game we played as kids, where the information gets exaggerated and garbled the more it gets repeated.

The main reason the raw foods diet works for people is because they have to eliminate all processed food and a bunch of lectin-containing legumes and grains that aren't palatable raw. The fact that everything is raw is a red herring. You can get the same benefits from paleo/primal, where you cook most of your meat and have free choice about how you prepare veggies.
  • 1




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: