Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Kraft Shredded Cheese?
0

23 posts in this topic

I was wondering if anyone could let me know for sure if this shredded cheese I have is gluten free?

It's Kraft Natural shredded sharp cheddar cheese. The ingredients are:

"Cheddar cheese (pasteurized milk, cheese culture, salt, enzymes, annatto (color); potato starch, cellulose powder, and calcium sulfate added to prevent caking; natamycin (a natural mold inhibitor)"

I've read that Kraft is good about labeling or something (can someone explain?) but I'm still pretty new to this and paranoid about things that don't specifically say gluten free on them. And the other week I thought I read something on here about kraft not confirming that products are gluten free when people call or something. I'm not sure, maybe I'm remembering wrong. I think the cheese looks okay but I just wanted to be sure. if you guys could help that would be great. Thanks so much!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

This cheese is fine. I use Kraft shredded cheeses quite often:)

Kraft is a company that will disclose any gluten on the ingredient list.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kraft cheese is good stuff. If you can find the WHITE cheddar, it is even better. Here in the midwest they put that nasty orange dye (annatto)in ALL cheeses and all it does is water down the taste and mealy up the texture. Safeway has white cheddar, and so does Walmart - they have Cabot extra-sharp white cheddar, and if you've never had it, TRY it! It's so good it's worth bying the big brick and shredding your own.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah-- Cabot is really good:)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much, guys!

Oh and believe me- my mom and I LOVE Cabot. We have some of the Seriously Sharp white cheddar right now and it's sooooo good. I bought the Kraft pre shredded because it's better for salads. Not really taste wise but in texture. The Cabot is very moist and it tends to stay in one big clump when you put it in a salad while the Kraft doesn't really stick together at all. Plus when I shred up some of the Cabot to put into a salad it tends to disappear before it makes it into my bowl...strange haha. Anyway, thanks again for the help!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




They dust the shreds with corn starch to keep it from clumping together. If you can tolerate corn you could do the same with the Cabot.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've read that Kraft is good about labeling or something (can someone explain?)

What this means is that for the generic terms of "natural flavoring" or "seasonings", Kraft will put something like "natural flavoring (derived from barley)" so that you know when you read the label if something is hidden in the generic term.

Other good companies that do this are Unilever and ConAgra.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They dust the shreds with corn starch to keep it from clumping together. If you can tolerate corn you could do the same with the Cabot.

Not too sure they dust with corn starch. Most use cellulose.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And the cellulose is often derived from corn. (It's better than wood chips!) The corn allergy forums said to avoid these so I assumed it was corn starch, but either way it has a high potential to have corn. And they DO reccommend using corn starch at home.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And the cellulose is often derived from corn. (It's better than wood chips!) The corn allergy forums said to avoid these so I assumed it was corn starch, but either way it has a high potential to have corn. And they DO reccommend using corn starch at home.

I have never heard of cellulose being derived from corn (or any other grain). Please provide a verifiable source for this allegation.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And they DO reccommend using corn starch at home.

HUH? :blink: I'm pretty knowledgeable about gluten, but I have no need to research corn...thank goodness. I can assume it would be very difficult.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is extremely difficult! If the only thing that bothered me were gluten I would be able to eat most gluten-free breads and other goodies. As it is, I have to eat only whole foods. (Well, except for the Hagen Daz vanilla. :rolleyes: ) But then again, I wouldn't be back to BELOW my high school weight, so I guess I'll take the good with the bad.

Here's a link about using corn starch at home:

http://www.home-ec101.com/how-to-store-shredded-cheese/

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a link about using corn starch at home:

http://www.home-ec101.com/how-to-store-shredded-cheese/

Okay, but using corn starch at home has nothing to do with cellulose used in manufacturing.

From that very link: "If you look at bags of pre-shredded cheese in the supermarket, you will see they have an anti-clumping agent, usually cellulose." [emphasis mine]

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But my point is, cellulose CAN be from corn. It isn't always, but if you have a corn intolerance or allergy it's wise to avoid cellulose. They don't have to name the source on the label and the only way to know for sure is to contact the manufacturer. And half the time they can't tell you because they get their cellulose from many different sources depending on price and availability.

Here is a list of POSSIBLE corn containing ingredients I got from one of my corn allergy sites:

http://www.cornallergens.com/list/corn-allergen-list.php

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We just called Kraft because I've been sick for the past 3 days after eating Kraft cheese. My husband spoke to them and they told him it is NOT gluten free. They said IF the ingredients show 'Color' or 'flavor' or 'Spice it' could contain trace amounts of gluten because they get those ingredients from another source.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We just called Kraft because I've been sick for the past 3 days after eating Kraft cheese. My husband spoke to them and they told him it is NOT gluten free. They said IF the ingredients show 'Color' or 'flavor' or 'Spice it' could contain trace amounts of gluten because they get those ingredients from another source.

..and that would be a clear violation of the law.  If wheat is used in a product, by law, it must be listed on the ingredient listing or allergin statement.  Kraft had a great policy and lists all forms of gluten.  Perhaps, you contacted an uninformed customer relations representative.

 

http://www.kraftfoodservice.com/bw/healthyliving/foodallergies.aspx

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The lady seemed to be very informed. Here is the phone number. 1-800-847-1997

 

She said IF the ingredients show 'Color' or 'flavor' or 'Spice it' could contain trace amounts of gluten because they get those ingredients from another source.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unless the rep has Celiac Disease, she is not informed.  I am extremely sensitive and use Kraft cheeses and have never reacted.  Ditto for many other Celiacs.  You cannot hide gluten in flavorings or anything else without disclosing  that and Kraft is a very gluten-free friendly company.  What she gave you was a CYA statement to cover their butts from a litigation point of view.  Everyone says this and it means nothing for the Celiac.....it just protects the company in case someone decides to sue them.

 

In any case, "color", "flavorings" and "spices", not spice blends, are safe for Celiacs 99.9% of the time.  That's another clue she wasn't informed or she would have known this.  These are celiac myths that just won't die.  Cheese can make anyone sick for many other reasons but there is no gluten in Kraft cheese.....shredded or otherwise.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We just called Kraft because I've been sick for the past 3 days after eating Kraft cheese. My husband spoke to them and they told him it is NOT gluten free. They said IF the ingredients show 'Color' or 'flavor' or 'Spice it' could contain trace amounts of gluten because they get those ingredients from another source.

In other words, they won't make a "gluten-free" claim for legal reasons. Frequently "not gluten-free" only means not tested to verify gluten-free status--not that gluten is actually present.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We just called Kraft because I've been sick for the past 3 days after eating Kraft cheese. My husband spoke to them and they told him it is NOT gluten free. They said IF the ingredients show 'Color' or 'flavor' or 'Spice it' could contain trace amounts of gluten because they get those ingredients from another source.

What specific product was it?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is an old topic, and CommonTater has not been here in over a year.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much, guys!

Oh and believe me- my mom and I LOVE Cabot. We have some of the Seriously Sharp white cheddar right now and it's sooooo good. I bought the Kraft pre shredded because it's better for salads. Not really taste wise but in texture. The Cabot is very moist and it tends to stay in one big clump when you put it in a salad while the Kraft doesn't really stick together at all. Plus when I shred up some of the Cabot to put into a salad it tends to disappear before it makes it into my bowl...strange haha. Anyway, thanks again for the help!

The reason the Kraft cheese shreds don't stick together is because of the potato starch.  The shreds are covered with the potato starch so they don't stick together.  You can use that same thing to keep raisins suspended in breads, etc.  Just coat them with potato or corn starch before putting them in the batter.  Then they grab onto the dough instead of being so heavy that they drop to the bottom.  I don't know if you can make this work with cheese that you shred yourself or not.  I'll have to do some experimenting.  I usually just dice the cheese up very fine and that works pretty well.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oops. Wrong thread.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,105
    • Total Posts
      920,391
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Here is another point.  My hubby went gluten-free per the poor advice of his GP and my allergist.  It worked.  A tough first year, but he got well.  Thirteen years later, I got diagnosed with celiac disease.  I was shocked!  😱.   Does he have celiac disease?  We will never know because we can not afford to have him do a challenge.  He refuses and I can not blame him.  He knows he will be very sick!   The point?  I am so lucky that we both can not have gluten.  I never worry about him making me sick or vice versa. We made the house completely gluten free for  1) our health and 2) the fact that our kid started helping in the kitchen. Kids make mistakes and I personally need a safe haven.  She wants gluten?  I buy prepackaged stuff and she takes it to school.  All parties and events at my house are gluten free.  Lots of work, but we stay healthy.  She does not have celiac disease.  When she is preparing for a celiac test,  I send her on the porch to eat cookies or bread or whatever floats her boat.  We travel in a gluten-free RV.  I have five sizes of ice chests.  We just have to be prepared for any event.   How can we live this way?   We love feeling good.
    • Freize is right, you need to think about your environment.   Based on that a study I posted for you, you will note that the patients who were diagnosed with refractory celiac disease and THOUGHT they were diet compliant found that they WERE NOT diet compliant.  How is this possible?   This is way out there, but unless you are growing all your own food, you don't really know if it is gluten free.  In the US, we do have laws to help protect our food supplies (no perfect, but a start).    I can not speak for India.  For example, what about your soy?  It can be contaminated by the farmer as it is often rotated with wheat.  Here is an article by Jane Anderson who has celiac disease.  She is very strict as she has DH (celiac rash), but she cites Trisha Thompson who tests foods for gluton contamination, The gluten-free WatchDog (like Consumer reports).  She found that soy which is naturally gluten free, but can be cross contaminated by wheat: https://www.verywell.com/is-soy-gluten-free-562371 so, start thinking about your food supply. As far as a negative TTG IGA or TTG IGG?  I test negative to both.  Only the DGP IGA has ever been elevated in my blood tests (even repeats), yet I had a Marsh Stage IIIIB on my biopsy.  Have you had a DGP IGG?  (I do not see this in your posting).   http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/screening/ These additonal celiac tests might help you feel confident that you have celiac disease and not something else that is damaging your villi.  But remember, some  folks have celiac disease even with negative blood.  I am not IGA deficient, so this is an area I have not researched.  Not to mention that some celiac researchers do not think that the celiac  antibodies tests are good for diet compliancy.   I wish I had better answers for you.  Try a grain free, whole foods diet of meats, fish, eggs, and vegetables for a while.  All food prepared by you. Who cooks your food now?  Is your home gluten free?  Cross contamination at home?  Kissing a loved one.  We had a doctor with celiac disease who was getting glutened by her little children who were consuming gluten!  
    • I won't say I will never eat out but I can't see me eating out for the foreseeable future. Even then, I will most likely only eat at a dedicated gluten free place. I am extremely sensitive to the tiniest amount of gluten and it's just not worth the risk to me. Eating out is playing Russian Roulette as far as I'm concerned and I'm not ready to play that game yet.
    • You are right. The weirdest part is that I feel fine, however, I am sure cross-contamination is doing damage even when we don't think it is. 
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,144
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    GlutenFreeGreg
    Joined