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Kraft Shredded Cheese?


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22 replies to this topic

#1 abby03

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 12:35 PM

I was wondering if anyone could let me know for sure if this shredded cheese I have is gluten free?

It's Kraft Natural shredded sharp cheddar cheese. The ingredients are:

"Cheddar cheese (pasteurized milk, cheese culture, salt, enzymes, annatto (color); potato starch, cellulose powder, and calcium sulfate added to prevent caking; natamycin (a natural mold inhibitor)"

I've read that Kraft is good about labeling or something (can someone explain?) but I'm still pretty new to this and paranoid about things that don't specifically say gluten free on them. And the other week I thought I read something on here about kraft not confirming that products are gluten free when people call or something. I'm not sure, maybe I'm remembering wrong. I think the cheese looks okay but I just wanted to be sure. if you guys could help that would be great. Thanks so much!
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#2 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 12:38 PM

This cheese is fine. I use Kraft shredded cheeses quite often:)

Kraft is a company that will disclose any gluten on the ingredient list.
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Patti


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#3 bartfull

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 12:44 PM

Kraft cheese is good stuff. If you can find the WHITE cheddar, it is even better. Here in the midwest they put that nasty orange dye (annatto)in ALL cheeses and all it does is water down the taste and mealy up the texture. Safeway has white cheddar, and so does Walmart - they have Cabot extra-sharp white cheddar, and if you've never had it, TRY it! It's so good it's worth bying the big brick and shredding your own.
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#4 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 12:47 PM

Yeah-- Cabot is really good:)
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Patti


"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

#5 abby03

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 12:57 PM

Thanks so much, guys!

Oh and believe me- my mom and I LOVE Cabot. We have some of the Seriously Sharp white cheddar right now and it's sooooo good. I bought the Kraft pre shredded because it's better for salads. Not really taste wise but in texture. The Cabot is very moist and it tends to stay in one big clump when you put it in a salad while the Kraft doesn't really stick together at all. Plus when I shred up some of the Cabot to put into a salad it tends to disappear before it makes it into my bowl...strange haha. Anyway, thanks again for the help!
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#6 bartfull

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 01:53 PM

They dust the shreds with corn starch to keep it from clumping together. If you can tolerate corn you could do the same with the Cabot.
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#7 Darn210

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 02:19 PM

I've read that Kraft is good about labeling or something (can someone explain?)



What this means is that for the generic terms of "natural flavoring" or "seasonings", Kraft will put something like "natural flavoring (derived from barley)" so that you know when you read the label if something is hidden in the generic term.

Other good companies that do this are Unilever and ConAgra.
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#8 Lisa

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 02:33 PM

They dust the shreds with corn starch to keep it from clumping together. If you can tolerate corn you could do the same with the Cabot.


Not too sure they dust with corn starch. Most use cellulose.
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Lisa

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#9 bartfull

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 02:44 PM

And the cellulose is often derived from corn. (It's better than wood chips!) The corn allergy forums said to avoid these so I assumed it was corn starch, but either way it has a high potential to have corn. And they DO reccommend using corn starch at home.
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#10 psawyer

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 03:20 PM

And the cellulose is often derived from corn. (It's better than wood chips!) The corn allergy forums said to avoid these so I assumed it was corn starch, but either way it has a high potential to have corn. And they DO reccommend using corn starch at home.

I have never heard of cellulose being derived from corn (or any other grain). Please provide a verifiable source for this allegation.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
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#11 Lisa

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 03:21 PM

And they DO reccommend using corn starch at home.


HUH? :blink: I'm pretty knowledgeable about gluten, but I have no need to research corn...thank goodness. I can assume it would be very difficult.
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Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

#12 bartfull

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 03:32 PM

It is extremely difficult! If the only thing that bothered me were gluten I would be able to eat most gluten-free breads and other goodies. As it is, I have to eat only whole foods. (Well, except for the Hagen Daz vanilla. :rolleyes: ) But then again, I wouldn't be back to BELOW my high school weight, so I guess I'll take the good with the bad.

Here's a link about using corn starch at home:

http://www.home-ec10...hredded-cheese/
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#13 psawyer

 
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Posted 02 July 2012 - 05:08 PM

Here's a link about using corn starch at home:

http://www.home-ec10...hredded-cheese/

Okay, but using corn starch at home has nothing to do with cellulose used in manufacturing.

From that very link: "If you look at bags of pre-shredded cheese in the supermarket, you will see they have an anti-clumping agent, usually cellulose." [emphasis mine]
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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#14 bartfull

 
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Posted 03 July 2012 - 10:30 AM

But my point is, cellulose CAN be from corn. It isn't always, but if you have a corn intolerance or allergy it's wise to avoid cellulose. They don't have to name the source on the label and the only way to know for sure is to contact the manufacturer. And half the time they can't tell you because they get their cellulose from many different sources depending on price and availability.

Here is a list of POSSIBLE corn containing ingredients I got from one of my corn allergy sites:

http://www.cornaller...lergen-list.php
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#15 CommonTater

 
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Posted 09 April 2013 - 07:24 AM

We just called Kraft because I've been sick for the past 3 days after eating Kraft cheese. My husband spoke to them and they told him it is NOT gluten free. They said IF the ingredients show 'Color' or 'flavor' or 'Spice it' could contain trace amounts of gluten because they get those ingredients from another source.


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After many years of suffering from Late Stage Lyme Disease I became Gluten intolerant and I'm extremely sensitive.





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