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Walmart's Produce
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I was at Walmart in the produce section, and I noticed they have a little sign on the apples and other fruits that said something about them being coated with food-grade vegetable wax. I know 'vegetable' can be a code word for wheat sometimes. I bought some plums, figuring I'd be safe just washing them off good. Then I ate one for supper last night, and today I'm headachey like I've had gluten. The plum was the only thing I ate that's a possibility for gluten.

The sign did say that you could ask a manager for more information, but I didn't bother.

I was just wondering if any of you have had the same problem? Have you asked a manager about it? And if it is made from wheat, is there some way to get the waxy stuff off of it?

Thanks in advance. :)

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All fresh fruit and vegetables are gluten free. The wax coating is not from gluten. It doesn't have anything to do with Walmart or which store you purchase it from, it's all the same.

With that said, I have SALS sensitivity and have to avoid certain fruits. Plums are one of them. Grapes are another. Google SALS sensitivity and look at the food list.

Also, it could have nothing to do with the plum, sometimes gluten reactions are delayed a few days. Maybe you were CC somewhere.

I hope you feel better soon!

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I was at Walmart in the produce section, and I noticed they have a little sign on the apples and other fruits that said something about them being coated with food-grade vegetable wax. I know 'vegetable' can be a code word for wheat sometimes. I bought some plums, figuring I'd be safe just washing them off good. Then I ate one for supper last night, and today I'm headachey like I've had gluten. The plum was the only thing I ate that's a possibility for gluten.

The sign did say that you could ask a manager for more information, but I didn't bother.

I was just wondering if any of you have had the same problem? Have you asked a manager about it? And if it is made from wheat, is there some way to get the waxy stuff off of it?

Thanks in advance. :)

I have had a gluten reaction and muscle testing suggested it was due to a coating on plums (organic!) also. According to the FDA, apparently gluten is allowed in some fresh produce waxes or resins... see http://www.fda.gov/Food/LabelingNutrition/FoodAllergensLabeling/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/ucm111487.htm#q14 for more info...

-Razzle

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(organic!)

Welcome.

Organic does not mean gluten-free. Organic does not mean healthy. Organic means no synthetic chemicals were used. Wheat can be grown organically. Organic peaches have pits that contain cyanide. If "organic" floats your boat, so be it.

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I have had a gluten reaction and muscle testing suggested it was due to a coating on plums (organic!) also. According to the FDA, apparently gluten is allowed in some fresh produce waxes or resins... see http://www.fda.gov/Food/LabelingNutrition/FoodAllergensLabeling/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/ucm111487.htm#q14 for more info...

-Razzle

There is no gluten in wax on fruits or veggies....period. This is one of those nonsense things that just will not die. Muscle testing falls into that category also. Useless information. The FDA are no authority on gluten and their information is wrong. If there was any merit to it, Celiac organizations would be warning people about the wax and they never have. This is right up there with the notion that all gluten free labeled foods are contaminated or fruits and veggies can "uptake" imaginary gluten from the soil.

Relax, folks...fruits and veggies are safe, unless you have a specific allergy to them.

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I have problems with store produce, and not when I grow it myself. I don't know why, but if it is wax coatings, I believe that the amounts are well below the 20 ppm allowable levels so celiac organizations don't concern themselves with it at this time. Typical celiacs needn't worry themselves either.

To the OP, are you one who reacts to low levels of gluten?

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I honestly don't know how sensitive I am to small amounts. I'm not a diagnosed celiac, but I don't eat in restaurants due to cc, and I avoid foods that 'may contain traces' just because I don't know. I know that bigger amounts of gluten definitely give me trouble, but I'm not sure about smaller amounts.

I think the next time I go to Walmart, I'll ask a manager about that. I'm guessing they won't have a clue, but it won't hurt to ask. I read somewhere about some sort of vinegar soak that you can soak fruits in to take off the wax, without giving the fruit a bad flavor. So I might look into that. I've never had a problem with apples or anything before, but that plum gave me a nasty headache. I'm hoping I can get this figured out.

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I honestly don't know how sensitive I am to small amounts. I'm not a diagnosed celiac, but I don't eat in restaurants due to cc, and I avoid foods that 'may contain traces' just because I don't know. I know that bigger amounts of gluten definitely give me trouble, but I'm not sure about smaller amounts.

I think the next time I go to Walmart, I'll ask a manager about that. I'm guessing they won't have a clue, but it won't hurt to ask. I read somewhere about some sort of vinegar soak that you can soak fruits in to take off the wax, without giving the fruit a bad flavor. So I might look into that. I've never had a problem with apples or anything before, but that plum gave me a nasty headache. I'm hoping I can get this figured out.

I doubt the manager would be able to help, unless they have Celiac and they are informed. As there is no gluten in waxes, not even trace amounts, it might be that you are having trouble digesting the wax itself. This could cause GI distress for someone who eats the fruit without washing off the wax. I use a spray that is sold in the fruit section, that is gluten free and uses citrus acids as a base for removal of the wax. You just spray it on and wait a few minutes and then rinse. Works very well and is safe for Celiacs to use.

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I react to trace gluten. I am pretty sensitive, yet

I eat all fruits and vegetables with absolutely no problem after I wash them well--in hot water--- and sometimes, the spray that Gemini has suggested.

I have even just doused them quickly with some bottled water when I am hungry and purchased them from a farm stand or a supermarket.

Gluten does not lurk in the produce section.

You could have an allergy or something else provoked your headache.

(and muscle testing is a scam, sorry! Absolutely no scientific or medical evidence that it tells you anything about "allergies" or "intolerances" at all. )

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I have had a gluten reaction and muscle testing suggested it was due to a coating on plums (organic!) also. According to the FDA, apparently gluten is allowed in some fresh produce waxes or resins... see http://www.fda.gov/Food/LabelingNutrition/FoodAllergensLabeling/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/ucm111487.htm#q14 for more info...

-Razzle

Your link is to a Q&A section about the propsed gluten free labelling law. It doesn't say gluten is allowed on fruit or not.

"Questions and Answers on the Gluten-Free Labeling Proposed Rule"

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I would start by making sure you're cleaning your produce well before ingesting, there is no gluten in fruits or veggies, but who knows what else could be on there or who touched it before you and what was on their hands!? Ugh, horrid thought. Also, keep track of how you feel when you eat certain items, you may find that you're sensitive to certain items as well. :)

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