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Does Bcm7 (A Milk Opiod) Initiate Celiac Disease?


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#1 icm

 
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Posted 07 July 2012 - 12:59 PM

I've heard lots about gluten and how it triggers the immune system to destroy the lining of the small intestine but only when it is ingested.

I've heard quite a bit about casein lately (and pretty interesting stuff on beta-casomorphin-7 (bcm7) - an opiod-like fragment that gets easily released on digestion from A1 milk. Most of our milk today has a mixture of A1 and A2 beta casein.

A1 milk seems like it might be behind many health problems like initiating type 1 diabetic beta cell destruction by the immune system along with heart disease, autism, schitzophrenia and food allergies.

Lately I've debated to myself whether it may possibly initiate celiac disease too. I've heard that the opiods in casein are more powerful than those in gluten. It seems that countries like Finland and Sweden (where A1 milk consumption is highest in the world due to Ayrshire cow breeds) have the highest incidence of type 1 diabetes.

Celiac seems pretty common over there too!

So here's my question... Does bcm7 possibly initiate celiac disease and/or gluten sensitivity?

I'd be very interested in your thoughts on this insightful topic.
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#2 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 07 July 2012 - 03:39 PM

No, it does not.
Celiac is triggered by gluten, but there must be other factors apart from gluten that can contribute to the development of celiac disease.

From the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University:

"Some of the factors are the timing of the first ingestion of gluten in childhood and the amount of gluten, whether breast feeding occurs and whether other members of the family have celiac disease. Smoking also influences the onset of celiac disease.

Still, why celiac disease develops in some individuals in childhood and others as adults is unclear. One is not born with the disease. One is born with a genetic tendency to develop the disease. It is considered that gastrointestinal infections may be a factor that can trigger the development of the disease."

You keep saying "I've heard"...where exactly do you hear this?
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#3 deb445

 
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Posted 07 July 2012 - 04:02 PM

Lately I've debated to myself whether it may possibly initiate celiac disease too. I've heard that the opiods in casein are more powerful than those in gluten. It seems that countries like Finland and Sweden (where A1 milk consumption is highest in the world due to Ayrshire cow breeds) have the highest incidence of type 1 diabetes.

Celiac seems pretty common over there too!

So here's my question... Does bcm7 possibly initiate celiac disease and/or gluten sensitivity?

I'd be very interested in your thoughts on this insightful topic.

Very interesting - I've not done any research on milk like you obviously have.
In my opinion, there is so much science that has yet to be discovered. This is only punctuated by the fact that so many who are suffering, find relief with eliminating certain foods (e.g. grains, dairy) from their diet - yet so many people go years, and spend a small fortune trying to get a diagnosis. I too am curious about what triggers the gene to express itself.
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#4 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 07 July 2012 - 04:20 PM

But, the research is clear and I just said it: Gluten.

Gluten ingestion, a genetic predisposition and some type of trauma, such as an accident, an injury, pregnancy, extreme stress, and a viral infection. Possibly environmental factors (research is ongoing)

These are the celiac "triggers", as far as we know.
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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#5 Lisa

 
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Posted 07 July 2012 - 04:58 PM

Is this where you found your information?

http://www.healthnow...are-a-bad-idea/

I would not spend too much time bending your brain on this blog.

From my good friend Joy Baurer:

Lactose intolerance is not a food allergy; it does not involve an immune response to milk or lactose, and it is not dangerous. Lactose intolerance occurs in individuals who do not make adequate amounts of the enzyme “lactase,” which is required to digest “lactose,” a specific type of sugar found in milk and other dairy products. Individuals with lactose intolerance experience gastrointestinal symptoms such as bloating, gas, diarrhea and stomach cramping about 20 minutes to two hours after consuming high-lactose foods like milk, ice cream, puddings and creamy soups.
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#6 Oscar

 
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Posted 07 July 2012 - 05:05 PM

I've heard lots about gluten...

I've heard quite a bit about casein lately...

I've heard lots of things, too. I've heard that JFK was assassinated by LBJ to gain access to the White House. I've heard that Kraft Foods put gluten in everything they make, and then lie about it. I've heard that Sarah Palin is sane.

I've heard ain't worth nuthin, unless you have a credible source to back it up.
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#7 Jestgar

 
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Posted 07 July 2012 - 06:14 PM

I've heard lots about gluten and how it triggers the immune system to destroy the lining of the small intestine but only when it is ingested.

I've heard quite a bit about casein lately (and pretty interesting stuff on beta-casomorphin-7 (bcm7) - an opiod-like fragment that gets easily released on digestion from A1 milk. Most of our milk today has a mixture of A1 and A2 beta casein.

A1 milk seems like it might be behind many health problems like initiating type 1 diabetic beta cell destruction by the immune system along with heart disease, autism, schitzophrenia and food allergies.

Lately I've debated to myself whether it may possibly initiate celiac disease too. I've heard that the opiods in casein are more powerful than those in gluten. It seems that countries like Finland and Sweden (where A1 milk consumption is highest in the world due to Ayrshire cow breeds) have the highest incidence of type 1 diabetes.

Celiac seems pretty common over there too!

So here's my question... Does bcm7 possibly initiate celiac disease and/or gluten sensitivity?

I'd be very interested in your thoughts on this insightful topic.

Seems unlikely. I dislike milk and haven't consumed t since I was a child. Lots of people limit milk, and milk products, and still develop problems with gluten. All over the world. Even in places where they drink primarily goat's milk.
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#8 icm

 
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Posted 07 July 2012 - 06:50 PM

Type 1 diabetes and celiac are related closely genetically, aren't they? Keith Woodford's book: Devil in the Milk is something I read recently and he and scientific papers say that A1 milk gave diabetes prone mice t1 diabetes and a2 milk didn't. I'm thinking bcm7 might be the possible third factor for celiac disease. That's all.

Btw I'm not saying avoid dairy at all. I think milk products are great. Just not the A1 casein.
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#9 Jestgar

 
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Posted 07 July 2012 - 07:00 PM

Can you tell us any of the papers he cites so we can look them up for ourselves?
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#10 Skylark

 
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Posted 07 July 2012 - 07:48 PM

Um guys, you might want to go do some reading before you keep piling on with the skepticism and unsupportive posts. This is an interesting question and not as far-fetched as everyone seems to believe. There is a enough literature on cows milk and diabetes that I couldn't begin to summarize it. It's pretty clear that feeding cows milk in early infancy increases the incidence of T1. What's not clear is whether it has anything to do with A1 milk or BCM7. Casomorphins do get into the bloodstream, are active on opioid receptors, and can have effects on peripheral blood mononucleocytes.

One paper on A1 milk and a rebuttal that doesn't seem to have industry bias. (There is a lot of trouble with very biased and selectively referenced milk industry papers in the A1 casein literature.)
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/17666771
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/15867940

If cows milk has the ability to trigger type 1 diabetes (whether or not the mechanism is BCM7), given the links between the diseases it seems an interesting question as to whether it could predispose to celiac.
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#11 tom

 
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Posted 07 July 2012 - 10:03 PM

Ahh thank you Skylark, I wanted to comment on the OP's topic looking more trigger-related than post-disease gluten-related but couldn't have said it as well as you.


All I could get was a vague "there's a difference between pulling a trigger & pulling a trigger after the safety is off."

Regarding the OP, the area of celiac disease triggers doesn't seem to get much researcher attention, though maybe I'm looking in the wrong places & gene expression does get attn in auto-immune circles.

If an accident were a celiac's trigger, does that mean they'd never been in an accident before? Of course not because severity is left out.
If a pregnancy triggered celiac disease, is it always her 1st pregnancy? I think I've read otherwise here.

I don't know diddly about A1 milk & BCM7, but I do think there's some biological/genetic characteristic(s) analogous to "setting the safety off" on a firearm.
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>>>>>>> tom <<<<<<<

Celiac 1st diagnosed as a toddler, in the 60s. Docs then, between bloodletting & leech-tending, said "he'll grow out of it" & I was back on gluten & mostly fine for 30yrs.

Gluten-free since 12-03
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#12 icm

 
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Posted 07 July 2012 - 10:20 PM

Isn't it more a case of bad memory cells being created in the bone marrow that respond to dendritic cells with the celiac genes attached to them? Denise Faustman said something about this in a video on t1 diabetes.
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#13 beebs

 
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Posted 08 July 2012 - 12:08 AM

I think so little is really still known about autoimmune diseases. What triggers them, causes them etc. I don't believe it could be a simple as one thing, thanks for the links skylark, It'll be interesting to read.
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#14 icm

 
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Posted 08 July 2012 - 03:49 AM

Would epigenetics be relevant to any of this?
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#15 GFinDC

 
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Posted 08 July 2012 - 05:24 AM

The triggers idea for celiac reminds me of the way they used to talk about stomach ulcers. They (doctors) used to say ulcers were casued by stress, too much spicy foods, alcohol, etc. A whole slew of things that sort of sounded reasonable. But it turned out to be a bacteria causing the ulcers. And that is not the same at all. I don't think anyone really knows right now what causes one person to develop celiac vs another. Maybe that will change some day. The same debate is going on about Crohns' disease. None is really sure what triggers it. There is bacteria that some people think may be involved. But it is not really known for sure as other things seem to trigger it also, lots of ideas, not many answers.
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Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul




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