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Does Bcm7 (A Milk Opiod) Initiate Celiac Disease?


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#16 icm

 
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Posted 08 July 2012 - 05:50 AM

I did hear somewhere that Lyme disease might be the player in RA and MS in a few places. Wasn't an outbreak of RA the way that Lyme was discovered?
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#17 icm

 
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Posted 08 July 2012 - 05:55 AM

Though I just looked at http://betacasein.org and heart disease and type 1 diabetes incidence is right in line!

Correct me if I'm wrong but doesn't France have a lower incidence of celiac disease than most European countries? They drink more a2 milk and have less t1 diabetes than other places.
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#18 Skylark

 
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Posted 08 July 2012 - 10:28 AM

If an accident were a celiac's trigger, does that mean they'd never been in an accident before? Of course not because severity is left out.
If a pregnancy triggered celiac disease, is it always her 1st pregnancy? I think I've read otherwise here.

I don't know diddly about A1 milk & BCM7, but I do think there's some biological/genetic characteristic(s) analogous to "setting the safety off" on a firearm.

I like this analogy. There is something we are doing in modernized countries that seems to predispose to type 1 and celiac. Researchers think there is a "safety off" sort of situation because the incidences of T1 and celiac are rising at very similar rates, particularly in industrialized countries. The hygiene hypothesis doesn't go very far towards explaining it, though.

Would epigenetics be relevant to any of this?

I'm in the middle of reading Dr. Shanahan's book, Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Food. It's an eye-opener about how strong a role epigenetics can play in health, even across generations. The chapter on milk pasteurization was also fascinating. There are microstructural changes in milk after pasteurization and homogenization to the point that pasteurized/homogenized milk is a different food from what comes out of the cow's udder.

I would love to know if there is a difference in the T1 rate when babies are fed raw milk vs. pasteurized but I don't think it's even on researchers' radar. The reason I wonder is becasue milk tends to be pasteurized more in industrial countries where T1 and celiac are on the rise. Don't quote me on this; it is idle armchair speculation.
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#19 icm

 
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Posted 09 July 2012 - 12:11 AM

T1 was around before milk was pasteurized. The a1 bcm7 opiod would have still been released I suspect.
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#20 codetalker

 
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Posted 09 July 2012 - 02:26 AM

Would epigenetics be relevant to any of this?

A while back, I watched a program that explained epigenetics. The first thing that went through my mind was that it might explain why someone with genetic factors for celiac might not present the usual symptoms. Surprisingly, yours is probably the first post I've seen that mentioned epigenetics.
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#21 Skylark

 
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Posted 09 July 2012 - 07:32 AM

T1 was around before milk was pasteurized. The a1 bcm7 opiod would have still been released I suspect.

I guess what I was wondering about was kinetics of casomorphin release and absorption in raw vs. pasteurized. I don't know if it would be different.
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#22 carolynmay

 
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Posted 09 July 2012 - 02:22 PM

Well, to throw a slightly different spin into the mix, it seems there is at least suspicion that a bacterial strain in cow's milk (Mycobacterium para-tuberculosis) is what may at least sometimes be involved in triggering Crohn's Disease.

so it wouldn't be a ridiculous idea that something similar may happen to trigger Celiac Disease?

Especially as I think Type 1 diabetes is also thought to be linked to the same Mycobacteria.

I think what no-one is yet sure of is whether such a Mycobacterial strain could be the causative agent of these illnesses, or whether it is an opportunistic invader when the host body is already weakened.

Food for thought at least!

Carolyn
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#23 Skylark

 
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Posted 09 July 2012 - 04:00 PM

Wow, that's interesting! Did you happen to bookmark where you read it? I can probably dig it out but it's faster to have a link.

One of the things that can cause celiac is Campylobacter jejuni food poisoning.

And hey, check this article out on celiac autoimmunity and infections that just popped up with Google. Nothing to do with cows milk but really interesting!
http://www.sciencedi...568997208002012
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#24 tom

 
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Posted 09 July 2012 - 04:34 PM

Wow I can really learn a lot in this thread.

Codetalker, I think I saw the same show on epigenetics, or at least similar. It was fascinating.

Skylark, that last link had the term "molecular mimicry" in the abstract. I've wondered whether when ppl dismiss "cross-reactivity" as (often rightfully imho) nutty, if a valid "molecular mimicry" possibility gets wrongfully dismissed, a la baby/bathwater.
Not that I expect you to speak for "ppl", but thought you could easily reduce my confusion on the terms. :)
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>>>>>>> tom <<<<<<<

Celiac 1st diagnosed as a toddler, in the 60s. Docs then, between bloodletting & leech-tending, said "he'll grow out of it" & I was back on gluten & mostly fine for 30yrs.

Gluten-free since 12-03
Dairy-free since 10-04
Soy-free since 5-07

#25 Skylark

 
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Posted 09 July 2012 - 06:57 PM

Wow I can really learn a lot in this thread.

Codetalker, I think I saw the same show on epigenetics, or at least similar. It was fascinating.

Skylark, that last link had the term "molecular mimicry" in the abstract. I've wondered whether when ppl dismiss "cross-reactivity" as (often rightfully imho) nutty, if a valid "molecular mimicry" possibility gets wrongfully dismissed, a la baby/bathwater.
Not that I expect you to speak for "ppl", but thought you could easily reduce my confusion on the terms. :)

I don't generally even dismiss cross-reactivity. It seems to be a very misunderstood term on this board. Your antibodies are not perfect, and it's by design. If you made perfect antibodies, you would have no immune response against a slightly different strain of flu or bacteria. Say you get swine flu. You make antibodies and get well. A certain % of those antibodies will cross-react to the bird flu you might see next season. This is really handy because your immune system can go to work against the bird flu much faster. This happens in allergy too. People who are sensitive to ragweed pollen can cross-react to melons, and people who are sensitive to latex can cross-react to mango.

This is probably also the mechanism of oat-sensitive celiac disease and I put a publication here a while back that corn may be another trigger of villous atrophy in some folks. The corn sensitivity tends to happen in adults who have had time to develop a much wider variety of antibodies and thus have a higher probability of cross-reactivity to corn than children. Cross-reactivity to milk has also been demonstrated, but I've not seen a paper where the milk cross-reactivity lead to TTG and damage.

The confusion on the board is thinking that if someone has multiple intolerances they are all cross-reactions. Thus the ridiculous threads a while back on coffee. For example soy intolerance has never been linked to gluten cross-reactivity. It's just allergenic in its own right and our sensitive bodies tend to have a knack for making antibodies to it.

Molecular mimicry is a completely different idea. This is where a pathogen has proteins in its coat that mimic the host. The bacterium tricks your body into thinking it's a cell rather than an invader. If your immune system figures out the deception and makes antibodies to the mimic protein, they can be autoimmune. Again, this is because of that mild built-in cross reactivity antibodies have by design. Campylobacter is particularly dangerous because one of its mimic proteins resembles one in your nervous system. http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/17374131
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#26 tom

 
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Posted 09 July 2012 - 08:49 PM

Thanks :)
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>>>>>>> tom <<<<<<<

Celiac 1st diagnosed as a toddler, in the 60s. Docs then, between bloodletting & leech-tending, said "he'll grow out of it" & I was back on gluten & mostly fine for 30yrs.

Gluten-free since 12-03
Dairy-free since 10-04
Soy-free since 5-07

#27 icm

 
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Posted 10 July 2012 - 01:28 AM

Would some of these pathogens have morphine-like sequences of amino acids?

Also, which foods should I avoid if I want to keep away from morphine like substances. Don't soy corn and other foods also release opiods?
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#28 icm

 
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Posted 10 July 2012 - 01:30 AM

Also, I had autism when I was young, am gluten sensitive, still have some asd symptoms and have a leaky gut? Is there any such thing as leaky brain?
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#29 GFinDC

 
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Posted 10 July 2012 - 08:00 AM

... Is there any such thing as leaky brain?


HA HA, I think that's what we usually call brain fog on the forum. :)

Thanks for the explanation Skylark, that really helps!
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Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
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#30 Skylark

 
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Posted 10 July 2012 - 11:04 AM

Glad my cross-sensitivity explanation made sense. :)

Would some of these pathogens have morphine-like sequences of amino acids? Also, which foods should I avoid if I want to keep away from morphine like substances. Don't soy corn and other foods also release opiods?

All I've read about is gliadorphins and casomorphins.

Also, I had autism when I was young, am gluten sensitive, still have some asd symptoms and have a leaky gut? Is there any such thing as leaky brain?

"Leaky brain"? I'm sorry, you're going to have to explain what you mean and there probably won't be an answer because I've never even heard the phrase.
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