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What Am I Supposed To Eat?


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9 replies to this topic

#1 Sage122

 
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Posted 08 July 2012 - 11:41 AM

I'm 14. I've been a semi-vegetarian since I was 12 (my mom forces me to eat fish) When I was 13 I found out I was gluten intolerant (non celiac).

If Thats bad enough, I just found out I was semi allergic to corn and dairy. I can eat yogurt and frozen yogurt. Can't tolerate ice cream or chocolate. I can tolerate hard cheese but not any others.

What am I supposed to eat???? Waah help me. Recipes? Suggestions?
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#2 Skylark

 
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Posted 08 July 2012 - 11:51 AM

Your dairy intolerance sounds like lactose intolerance. Hard cheese ls low lactose, and yogurt is lower than ice cream because the bacteria break down some of the lactose. Try some Lactaid next time you have ice cream, milk or other fresh dairy.

A lot of people find they have to re-evaluate their decision to be vegetarian if they have multiple food intolerances like you do. It sounds like you can have nuts, eggs, and beans so maybe there are enough sources of protein. Lentils and rice are always good, or split pea soup with chunks of carrot and potato. Have eggs and hash browns for breakfast. You should be able to make corn-free/gluten-free bread for peanut butter sandwiches too.
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#3 Cara in Boston

 
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Posted 08 July 2012 - 12:51 PM

If you are open to eating more meat, I would get some books from the library about the Paleo Diet. It is grain free and dairy free - but sort of centers on meat (along with vegetables, fruits, nuts, etc.)
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#4 Sage122

 
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Posted 08 July 2012 - 01:53 PM

I refuse to eat any meat except for fish and seafood
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#5 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 08 July 2012 - 02:23 PM

There is a lot you can eat but much of it you will have to cook. A rice cooker is helpful. You can make rice in the bottom and they will have a steamer basket you can load with things like Chi-Chi (garbanzo beans) or any other kind of drained and rinsed bean, veggies, fish or shrimp etc. Most will come with a lot of recipes. If you make a good quantity it the leftovers would be good for lunch or dinner another day.
You should still be able to find some gluten free breads and crackers that you can have. There are a wide variety of nut butters and jellies you can try.
Some of the Thai kitchen products should also be suitable. Just read the labels. They can be found in the Oriental section of many grocery stores. I like the real thin rice noodles and often have those with veggies for supper. I use frozen veggies and put them in the water and when the water boils add the noodles. They cook really fast and then can be drained and buttered. (Butter is very low in both lactose and casien so even though it is dairy it may be tolerated.) The single serve Pacific Foods gluten free broths are also good to use. You just eat as a soup without draining.
The important thing when you are not eating meat is to make sure you are getting complete protein when you eat. Like eating beans along with rice for example. Your body needs ample protein to heal as quickly as possible.
Do check out the recipe section. We have vegetarians on the board that may be able to give you some good recipes. Also check out your local libary for cookbooks or even local thrift stores.
I like the old cookbooks in thrift stores because they give 'from scratch' recipes. Rather than saying to add a can of soup or a sauce they tell you how to make it. Cooking that way can be a lot of fun.
Do also look for Enjoy Life chocolate chips. They are allergan free and not bad at all. Great for adding to peanut butter cookies. In case you haven't got the recipe for flourless nut butter cookies it is really simple.
1 cup peanut butter
1 egg
1 cup sugar
about 1/4 cup chocolate chips (optional)
Mix ingredients. Line a cookie sheet with foil if desired. Form into balls and put on cookie sheet. Press a crosshatch pattern on the cookie with a lightly greased fork.
Bake in a preheated 350 oven for about 8 to 10 minutes depending on the size of the cookie. I start to check at 5 minutes and when the cookies are golden brown around the outside edges I pull them out. Let the cool for 5 minutes before taking off tin foil sheet.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#6 ~**caselynn**~

 
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Posted 08 July 2012 - 02:46 PM

There is a lot you can eat but much of it you will have to cook. A rice cooker is helpful. You can make rice in the bottom and they will have a steamer basket you can load with things like Chi-Chi (garbanzo beans) or any other kind of drained and rinsed bean, veggies, fish or shrimp etc. Most will come with a lot of recipes. If you make a good quantity it the leftovers would be good for lunch or dinner another day.
You should still be able to find some gluten free breads and crackers that you can have. There are a wide variety of nut butters and jellies you can try.
Some of the Thai kitchen products should also be suitable. Just read the labels. They can be found in the Oriental section of many grocery stores. I like the real thin rice noodles and often have those with veggies for supper. I use frozen veggies and put them in the water and when the water boils add the noodles. They cook really fast and then can be drained and buttered. (Butter is very low in both lactose and casien so even though it is dairy it may be tolerated.) The single serve Pacific Foods gluten free broths are also good to use. You just eat as a soup without draining.
The important thing when you are not eating meat is to make sure you are getting complete protein when you eat. Like eating beans along with rice for example. Your body needs ample protein to heal as quickly as possible.
Do check out the recipe section. We have vegetarians on the board that may be able to give you some good recipes. Also check out your local libary for cookbooks or even local thrift stores.
I like the old cookbooks in thrift stores because they give 'from scratch' recipes. Rather than saying to add a can of soup or a sauce they tell you how to make it. Cooking that way can be a lot of fun.
Do also look for Enjoy Life chocolate chips. They are allergan free and not bad at all. Great for adding to peanut butter cookies. In case you haven't got the recipe for flourless nut butter cookies it is really simple.
1 cup peanut butter
1 egg
1 cup sugar
about 1/4 cup chocolate chips (optional)
Mix ingredients. Line a cookie sheet with foil if desired. Form into balls and put on cookie sheet. Press a crosshatch pattern on the cookie with a lightly greased fork.
Bake in a preheated 350 oven for about 8 to 10 minutes depending on the size of the cookie. I start to check at 5 minutes and when the cookies are golden brown around the outside edges I pull them out. Let the cool for 5 minutes before taking off tin foil sheet.


I actually just ate this for supper! Rice with stirfried veggies, shrimp and chicken, So yummy! You could easily leave out the chicken and it would be just as good.
I've also made the peanut butter cookies and they are to die for, but with chocolate chips that's a whole new level! Haha I have to try it! My brother just loves them, I'll have to make some and send them his way....cause I'll eat them all if I don't! Great suggestions, I love it when others give suggestions. Even though I've been doing this a while it's so nice to hear others ideas!
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~**caselynn**~

#7 Skylark

 
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Posted 08 July 2012 - 03:00 PM

I just remembered we had a thread on gluten-free vegetarian ideas. You might try adding a post to see if you can revive the thread again. You're definitely not the only vegetarian on the board! Here's the link. :)

http://www.celiac.co...ian-meal-ideas/
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#8 GlutenFreeAustinite

 
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Posted 08 July 2012 - 05:01 PM

My best friend was gluten free/vegetarian for a while. There's a great cookbook out called The Gluten Free Vegan, by Susan O'Brien, which, while you may not be vegan, has great recipes than can easily be modified to simply vegetarian. But the others are right....you'll definitely have to cook. I know Amy's has some frozen vegetarian/gluten free burritos, but some people can't tolerate Amy's, though I haven't had a problem. They also have gluten free pizzas.

EDIT: and also, part of the reason my best friend started eating meat again was because she didn't get enough protein, as she had nut and tyramine intolerances. I was actually vegetarian when I went gluten free the first time. It's a really great diet, but sometimes it just doesn't work for your health. I know a lot of my friends who have moral issues with commercial meats stick with locally raised/pasture raised meats. I'm not trying to convince you to do anything or hate on your vegetarian diet, but simply offering alternatives if it gets too hard to cook/shop for the foods you need.
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#9 Sage122

 
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Posted 09 July 2012 - 05:11 AM

Wow this is so awesome!!! Thanks everyone! Amazing suggestions
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#10 shauniscrazy

 
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Posted 16 August 2012 - 01:47 PM

I'm 14. I've been a semi-vegetarian since I was 12 (my mom forces me to eat fish) When I was 13 I found out I was gluten intolerant (non celiac).

If Thats bad enough, I just found out I was semi allergic to corn and dairy. I can eat yogurt and frozen yogurt. Can't tolerate ice cream or chocolate. I can tolerate hard cheese but not any others.

What am I supposed to eat???? Waah help me. Recipes? Suggestions?

i am gluten intolerant and allergic to dairy also :(
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shauniscrazy




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