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Can My Child Carry Medication?
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My soon-to-be 11 yr old daughter has Celiac. She's great with her diet, very strict on what she eats and watches other people like a hawk if they are preparing food she will eat.

Occasionally (a few times a year) she accidentally ingests gluten. The reactions are ugly - vomiting, diarrhea and cramping so bad she literally can't straighten up.

She visits other family members often and usually carries a little purse with a gluten-free snack in it. She also carries her own hand sanitizer (since other kids touch other bottles), band aids/neosporin. She wants to carry a few of her prescription pills (hyoscyamine) with her in case she gets sick. I think it's a great idea since it allows her to treat her own symptoms rather than frantic calls to me to quickly bring her stomach medicine. Realistically, she probably won't need it. However, relatives have asked if she could bring it "just in case".

My concern is whether she could get in trouble for taking prescription meds (not in a bottle) around with her. (Not at school, but to VBS, church, other's houses, etc). Can I get a doctor's note for her to use validating her need to carry medicine? Thanks :)

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For some things like school, there are procedures for perscription meds. I know Boy Scout/ Cub Scout camps have rules. You have to give them to one leader with directions about them.

For friends & relatives houses, if she knows how to take them & you can really trust that, I would send them with her. What I might do is take most of the pills out of the perscription container. Just leave one or two doses in the bottle. This tells people what they are and that they are prescribed for her. She is getting to an age where a kid with unlabeled pills will look suspicious.

The pill bottle should be enough explanation of why she needs them and the dosage.

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The pharmacy can also provide you with an empty but duplicate bottle w/label. I've had to do this for the school since they required the actual bottle and I needed it for something else at the same time.

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Hymox is an IBS/IBD medication, does she have either one of those or was it rx'd because of the severe cramping that she gets when gluten is injested? My son has this rx'd but he is an IBS, most likely IBD, kiddo but can not take it since he has severe dysmotility in his intestines. Hymox stops the intestinal spasms, and it WORKS but for us it literally stops the intestinal tract...not a good thing when you hardly have any movement to begin with.

I would never let my child carry any type of medication that is not in its orginal container-anywhere.

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Hymox is an IBS/IBD medication, does she have either one of those or was it rx'd because of the severe cramping that she gets when gluten is injested? My son has this rx'd but he is an IBS, most likely IBD, kiddo but can not take it since he has severe dysmotility in his intestines. Hymox stops the intestinal spasms, and it WORKS but for us it literally stops the intestinal tract...not a good thing when you hardly have any movement to begin with.

I would never let my child carry any type of medication that is not in its orginal container-anywhere.

I was told IBS basically came with a Celiac diagnosis although the comment may have been directed towards my child only. She takes it due to severe cramping that is literally crippling during a celiac reaction.

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(Sorry typing on my laptop which means I'm prone to mistakes)

Karen - her carrying medication (without a label) was what bothered me. I wouldn't want anyone to see it and think she is carrying something illegal. The medication is actually fairly harmless (IMO). My other daughter takes one daily in the morning to keep tummy aches from developing (suspected IBS). So, yes, I do trust her to take it with her and not take it unless necessary.

I will probably ask the pharmacy to give her a small dose/bottlt to carry as another poster suggested. I may go ahead and ask her GI to write a small note verifying she has Celiac Disease as well.

Thanks :)

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I think your daughter sounds like an extremly responsible young lady whom I would allow to carry her own medication, provided it was in its orginal container.

I know all about the intestinal cramping. My son, whom wasn't even 7 yet, was in the ER multiple times with them. Hymox is AWESOME stuff it just stinks that it literally stops my son's intestinal tract :(

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