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May Contain Wheat


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9 replies to this topic

#1 Castle

 
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Posted 12 July 2012 - 10:07 AM

I have been gluten free for almost 3 years now but I still struggle with this topic.

Do you eat foods that have labels with "May contain wheat" Or " May contains traces of wheat"

I don't have physical symptoms so I don't ever really know if I have been contaminated or not. I never purposely eat food that I know contains wheat but I will eat foods that have the label saying "May contain" occasionally. What's your take on this and what do you do? I know it's my choice in the end but I am curious to know what other people do when it comes to this!

Thanks!
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#2 alex11602

 
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Posted 12 July 2012 - 10:26 AM

We don't in our house, but I also have two young children to think of and wouldn't take a chance with their health. I also find there are plenty of options without that warning, so why bother? That's my personal take on it.
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#3 psawyer

 
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Posted 12 July 2012 - 10:42 AM

Castle, you said in a previous topic that you are in Canada.

Here is information from Health Canada regarding such labels.

There is no meaningful difference between "may contain x" and "may contain traces of x"--both indicate the possibility of accidental content at some low level.

I generally avoid products that "may contain wheat," especially if there is an alternative that does not have the warning. But, the warning is voluntary, so its absence does not necessarily mean anything.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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#4 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 12 July 2012 - 01:02 PM



Do you eat foods that have labels with "May contain wheat" Or " May contains traces of wheat"


I also avoid stuff with this warning.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#5 Hornet

 
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Posted 12 July 2012 - 01:03 PM

I avoid all labels that say gluten-free but are not made in dedicated gluten-free facilities. I don't know in reality why it can be called gluten-free if there may be traces of gluten, soy or other allergens.
Ultimately you have to decide what is best for you and if eating traces of wheat poses a problem for your health.
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#6 ~**caselynn**~

 
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Posted 12 July 2012 - 03:56 PM

I'm an avoider as well, any possible trace is a trace too much for me. 😊
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#7 Castle

 
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Posted 16 July 2012 - 10:21 AM

Thank you all for your posts! I appreciate the feedback. I am leaning towards avoiding those foods with such labels but it's hard sometimes when there isn't an alternative.
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#8 lpellegr

 
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Posted 16 July 2012 - 05:23 PM

You also have to consider that since plenty of labels don't say anything about other things that might share the lines or factory, you could be eating things that "may contain traces of wheat" all the time without knowing it, so while it's good to avoid the potential contamination that they tell you about, it still won't keep you 100% safe. That said, if the package states that there's a chance for cross-contamination, I mentally thank them for their honesty and step away from the product.
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Lee

I never liked bread anyway.....

#9 eatmeat4good

 
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Posted 16 July 2012 - 05:45 PM

I'm 2 years gluten free.
Got sick from nuts contaminated...definitely gluten by my reaction.
So when I grabbed the Spaghetti sauce that proudly says Gluten free on the front, and I turn it over and it says Made in a facility that also processes wheat...um...no thank you.
I feel sorry that people believe that gluten free on the label means it IS gluten free.

I've been testing that off and on this last year and it's totally true for me that if it's made in a facility that processes wheat, I'll probably get sick.

So as painful as it is.....

I've decided only to eat Certified Gluten Free products.

Cause even if you don't find that warning on the label...and there are no gluten ingredients, it doesn't mean it isn't contaminated. Unfortunately.

I really wish it were not legal to use the Gluten Free on the label unless the product is tested.
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#10 Adalaide

 
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Posted 17 July 2012 - 03:44 AM

I appreciate the honesty from companies and steer clear of the products with that label. I was curious about it and tested it for myself. When I was feeling pretty well I decided to eat some dried blueberries with that label and had a very strong reaction. It's sort of a mixed bag for me though, as I take those words on the label as a warning of possible cc.

Here's what I mean by that. Cheetos for instance. Regular, normal Cheetos have no gluten ingredients but aren't produced in a gluten free facility. Sure, they take every precaution but who knows? Heck, they don't even have the warning on the bag, but I still won't eat them. On the other hand, Cheetos Naturals I will eat. It isn't that they are produced elsewhere, they aren't. It is that every batch is tested and verified gluten free, where the regular ones are not. It's an assurance thing that promises the product I am getting really is gluten free.

It's why I appreciate "processed in a facility..." warnings. My health just isn't worth risking over something like the Cheetos that are a little cheaper or the X that is mildly more convenient or whatever. Sure, it could very well be perfectly fine. But why risk it?
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