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Gluten Exposure
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Hello,

I am a total newbie. I have suspected a problem and then I am narrowing this down to gluten issues.

I just started eating gluten free for a couple days and we went to a car show and of course I thought that I could control my eating.

We had pulled pork with a bun....I tried not to eat much of the bun..Yeah you sure know what now is happening "abdominal discomfort and gas"

Oh well I am sure this was it. How do you handle car shows and fairs. I guess I just need to eat before hand.

All tips and tricks are appreciated.

Thanks,

Angela

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Welcome!

Yes, these places are difficult when you are new to being gluten free.

My first trip to the fair resulted in my negotiating with myself that I could eat the frozen chocolate dipped cheesecake on a stick if I was very, very, careful not to eat the graham cracker crust! OMG!! Some lessons just have to be learned the hard way. :huh:

Now I eat before and fill my purse with safe snacks and I only risk eating if they the stand that sells nothing but corn on the cob and it's still wrapped in husks. That is the only safe "fair food" for me.

It's kinda fun to observe other's enjoying their gluteny food but it is so not worth a week of being sick. So I'm happy to just watch.

Wait til you find out that the supermarket isn't much better and that foods labeled gluten free are not necessarily gluten free. Just yesterday I grabbed a jar of Mom's Spaghetti sauce. It had a nice cute gluten free label on it. But right under the ingredients it had the processed in a facility that also processes wheat, soy, etc. Well, I didn't think I would be sensitive to those products in the beginning. But I am. Thank god for the companies that put the statement of processed in a facility...because if not for them, I would be sick all the time.

Can't think of anything else at a fair that might be safe unless you can find a baked potato with the skin still on it.

Yeah, it's a whole new world!

But hopefully you will feel better soon.

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If you know you will be exposed to "social eating", eat before you go so you are not hungry, carry food and snacks in your bag/car at all times, and try to enjoy the social part rather than the eating part. I know, easier said than done, but with practice entirely doable. And you can always eat when you get home too.

I know it's not the same, but sadly it is how we have to manage it. Most food prepared for the public at large is not safe for us - there are just too many traps and pitfalls that most likely even the people providing the food are totally unaware of. Pulled pork probably has barbecue sauce which could well contain gluten, for example.

Try not to expose yourself to too many of these situations until you get the hang of eating gluten free. Then the danger zones become more obvious. Good gluten free eating :)

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Wait til you find out that the supermarket isn't much better and that foods labeled gluten free are not necessarily gluten free. Just yesterday I grabbed a jar of Mom's Spaghetti sauce. It had a nice cute gluten free label on it. But right under the ingredients it had the processed in a facility that also processes wheat, soy, etc. Well, I didn't think I would be sensitive to those products in the beginning. But I am.

In the US the standard for labeling products gluten free is not in place yet. So it's totally voluntary at this time.

If there are no gluten containing ingredients, and it's processed at a place that also processed gluten products...does not mean that it's contaminated. Although some very ultra sensitive people may find a reaction, most times it's a disclaimer.

Production lines are washed and sanitized between products and a shared facility is never a concern for me.

Taking baby steps in search of your own level of sensitivity will take some time and education. :)

I always have snacks in my car or purse and generally you have to plan ahead and assume nothing. Mushroom has offered some great advise.

Welcome Angela! It will all fall into place soon, I swear! B)

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Eat first, bring food, eat after...... If the food is going to be hard to resist, I bring something I really like but don't eat often, like Fritos or a Snickers bar or peanut M&Ms. It's a good idea to always carry some nuts or a granola type/ Lara bar with you. You might get stuck somewhere with nothing to eat.

As you go along, you will find things you can eat, sometimes. I have been to the baseball games. I don't really trust the stuff that should be gluten-free at the main concession stands. the people that work them often are just volunteers earning money for a club or low paid people who don't care. They had little wagons that made popcorn and limeades only. Cotton candy only. Packaged peanuts & chips. Frozen Minute Maid lemonade. Candy. A special hot dog & braut only stand, with real live grown-ups who looked like they were enjoying cooking. I would feel I could ask them to be careful and watch them.

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I don't think I'm "ultra-sensitive"....I think I'm "Celiac".

The medical literature says even traces of gluten can make a Celiac sick. It doesn't say only "ultra-sensitive" Celiacs will get sick from traces of gluten.

To the OP, you will find out if you are sensitive to products made in a facility that also processes wheat. Some people find they are and some are not.

I'm really very thankful that companies voluntarily put the "made in a facility statement" on their products. I wouldn't even have known that kind of sensitivity was possible if it weren't for reading here. And if I didn't know it, I would still be sick. I was just trying to let ya know in case you find out those things "get" you too.

Anyway, the first few months are difficult but you will find yourself able to enjoy fairs and car shows when your purse is stuffed with little goodies you CAN eat!

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I don't think I'm "ultra-sensitive"....I think I'm "Celiac".

The medical literature says even traces of gluten can make a Celiac sick. It doesn't say only "ultra-sensitive" Celiacs will get sick from traces of gluten.

This is another great topic worthy of a discussion. Perhaps eatmeat4good would like to begin a new topic. :)

Continue on....with the OP's topic. How do you handle eating out?

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Hi, it can be difficult to begin with finding gluten free foods, but it gets easier in time. To fully recover though, you need to remember that you must not eat any gluten bread at all, as even one crumb can cause problems and destroy the villi in your gut. Cheating is not an option as, even Coeliacs that don't have symptoms are risking their health by eating anything with gluten in it, no matter how small.

If I go out for the day, I take my own gluten free snacks and meals with me just in case I can't find anywhere that will accommodate a gluten free diet. It can be inconvenient at times, but it just needs a bit of planning and it's much better than the alternative of being ill.

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I keep in my purse single serve packets of nuts or trail mix I get at Trader Joes and Lara Bars in case I get stuck without safe food. If I know I am going to be out for the day I will also take fruit and pop chips or other gluten free packaged snack that is a treat for me. Road trips, sunflowers seeds and single serve Justin's almond butter to but on bananas or apples. I also used to take tuna pouches but I am having issues with soy so have to avoid those, but may be okay for you. hope that helps.

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