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Some gluten-free Bread May Not Be Gluten Free!


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90 replies to this topic

#16 Jestgar

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 09:21 AM

In my opinion, the point is if corn affects even one celiac it may affect many. How many posts have I read from people saying they are sticking to the gluten free diet and still having symptoms? How many of those may be eating corn thinking it's a safe food, but for them it's not. Isn't it worth it for even one of those sufferers to be told that corn may be the culprit? It should be noted on the home page of Gluten-Free Mall: "Attention Celiacs: Some celiac sufferers react negatively to products containing corn. If you are sticking to the gluten free diet and still having symptoms, you might want to consider removing corn products from your diet to test if corn is an irritant." Something like that would really be helpful.

or soy

or milk

or nightshades

or salicylates

or any number of other things that end up bothering someone who has a messed up digestive system.

Look around, this is pretty common on this forum.
  • 2
"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"
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#17 DogWalkerNYC

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 09:34 AM

Exactly. This forum, and other similar forums and resources, are here to help people navigate through this situation.

As a fellow sufferer wouldn't it have been helpful when you first started out if you were made aware of some of the innuendos of dealing with celiac? Do you really think the better way is to learn by (painful, damaging) trial and error? Wouldn't you have appreciated being told, on some of these information sites, that some celiacs react to corn or soy or nightshades, etc.

Certainly on a site that sells food, like Gluten-Free Mall, I expected no less. Just a simple little disclaimer would have done it. Is that really too hard for them to do or might they be concerned about the effect such a notice would have on sales?

Also, you mentioned that 'not all celiacs react to corn'. But I read on this and other forums that just because celiacs may not have a reaction to eating glutened food that does not mean that damage to the intestines is not being done. In other words, just because you don't feel the damage doesn't mean it's not happening.
  • -1
Laura Grace

65 years old. Diagnosed with GERD at age 63. Started feeling bloated after eating bread & rolls in 2012. After doing online research ate gluten-free for a week & symptoms resolved. Symptoms returned when I glutened. That's good enough for me. Because testing is often inconclusive will not get tested. In 2012 had colonoscopy and endoscopy which showed no damage to the villi. In February, 2013 had capsule endoscopy which showed no damage to the villi or intestines. Diagnosed by gastroenterologist with 'probable non-Celiac sensitivity. Time to get serious before damage occurs.

#18 Jestgar

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 09:58 AM

Since anyone can react to anything, a disclaimer is really pointless. If you react to a particular food, it's up to you to read the ingredients. Why choose corn as your target annoying food, when there are so many?
  • 2
"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"
- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.
- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

#19 Junior Chef

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 10:06 AM

Corn has gluten in it. It's just a different gluten than what wheat, barley, and rye have. Yes, some people are corn intolerant. That doesn't mean corn isn't gluten free. I for one can handle corn, and I'm sure there are people that are super-sensitive to gluten that can eat it. Asking gluten free websites to start listing all the things you could be allergic to is like asking for more warning labels on things. There are just so many things that you could be intolerant/allergic to that it would be practically impossible to list them all.
  • 2

#20 DogWalkerNYC

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 10:23 AM

I am discussing corn at this moment because I was in the supermarket several hours ago buying Schar bread when I received the email saying that some gluten free breads are damaging to celiacs. That is the reason I'm discussing corn at this very moment. When I arrived home I went online to the Gluten-Free Mall to see if they carry the same product, and if there's a disclaimer, etc. And they do, and there is no disclaimer.

I completely disagree with you about the disclaimer. Any company that sells food products geared towards a particular group of people owes it to those people to provide them with every single detail, and every bit of information, about their possible or probable reaction to eating the food they are selling. Period. It is their moral and ethical obligation to their customers, who already have food issues and are coming to them to get healed.

Attention Celiacs: Certain celiacs are sensitive to one or more of the following products. Please be aware, or please speak to your doctor, or please do a test, or please anything, etc.

Yes, we all have different reactions to different products. But there are only a handful of items that are potentially harmful to many of us: corn, soy, dairy, nightshades, salicylates.

How hard would it be for a store selling gluten free products to mention the more common allergens? Corn has been iffy for while, from what I read. This is not a new problem food.

You can ban The Gluten Free Society for spamming or whatever they did, but it irks me that I heard about corn from a website that hasn't received a penny from me and not from The Gluten Free Mall, who sells this stuff to make a profit.
  • -5
Laura Grace

65 years old. Diagnosed with GERD at age 63. Started feeling bloated after eating bread & rolls in 2012. After doing online research ate gluten-free for a week & symptoms resolved. Symptoms returned when I glutened. That's good enough for me. Because testing is often inconclusive will not get tested. In 2012 had colonoscopy and endoscopy which showed no damage to the villi. In February, 2013 had capsule endoscopy which showed no damage to the villi or intestines. Diagnosed by gastroenterologist with 'probable non-Celiac sensitivity. Time to get serious before damage occurs.

#21 sreese68

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 10:27 AM

Personally, I eat a TON of corn products every day - grits, tostadas, tortillas, corn flakes, pasta, Fritos, etc. OK, maybe not all of those in one day, but several. And I feel AMAZING! Better than I have in over a decade! All my awful symptoms are gone or greatly diminished. So no, not all people with celiac react to corn or don't get better while eating it.

Now, brown rice is another story for me. Gives me the worst stomach pain and the big C. (C is one of the ways celiac affected me.) I can't eat gluten-free baked goods because almost all of them have brown rice flour in them. If I ate gluten-free bread, brown rice pasta, muffins, doughnuts, cookies, crackers, etc, I'd be in terrible shape. But that doesn't mean that no other celiacs should eat them.

You'll read a lot of alarming articles about what you should and shouldn't eat in terms of intolerances. Or what's safe or not in terms of cross contamination. It's best to research first, react second. Some articles are exaggerated. Some aren't. Classic example is not licking postage stamps or envelopes because the adhesive contains gluten. In actuality, they don't, but that misinformation keeps popping up.
  • 1
Sharon
gluten-free March 2011
Failed gluten challenge May 2011
Diagnosed celiac 5/25/11

#22 Jestgar

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 10:29 AM

I still disagree. You are responsible for your own health, and 50 disclaimers on a product only means that no one will read any of the disclaimers. If you choose to live your life expecting people to take care of you, that is certainly your right, but don't expect everyone to agree with you.

Isn't the GFS the one set up by one guy who wants you to buy all his products?
  • 6
"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"
- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.
- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

#23 DogWalkerNYC

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 10:52 AM

For those of you who are eating corn and feeling great, I read on this, and other forums, that if you are a true celiac even the smallest amount of gluten can cause damage to your intestines, whether or not you feel the damage. If corn contains gluten aren't you concerned about that? If not, why?

To Jestgar, of course we are all responsible for our own health, even me! And part of that responsibility is to learn who to trust, which people and companies run their companies ethically and honestly. We all cannot be experts, not even you. And so we rely on the experts we choose, and expect them to fill in the gaps in our knowledge base.

I am a business owner too and my clients expect me to be 'the expert' in the services I provide. When I do business with other companies I expect them to be 'the experts'. That does not mean I am not responsible for my own health. To the contrary, it means, I am very much responsible, and acting responsibly. And that means expecting the experts I turn to, to do their job.
  • -2
Laura Grace

65 years old. Diagnosed with GERD at age 63. Started feeling bloated after eating bread & rolls in 2012. After doing online research ate gluten-free for a week & symptoms resolved. Symptoms returned when I glutened. That's good enough for me. Because testing is often inconclusive will not get tested. In 2012 had colonoscopy and endoscopy which showed no damage to the villi. In February, 2013 had capsule endoscopy which showed no damage to the villi or intestines. Diagnosed by gastroenterologist with 'probable non-Celiac sensitivity. Time to get serious before damage occurs.

#24 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 11:02 AM

For those of you who are eating corn and feeling great, I read on this, and other forums, that if you are a true celiac even the smallest amount of gluten can cause damage to your intestines, whether or not you feel the damage. If corn contains gluten aren't you concerned about that? If not, why?


I eat corn both fresh and in flour form. I am a very sensitive celiac. I am not concerned at all. Corn gluten is not a concern for people with celiac disease, in general. Even though it is called gluten it is not the same as the gluten found in wheat, rye or barley.
You don't have to take my word for it. Go to the NIH or another reliable source like Celiac.org to research this not some guys website who is selling their own products.
There is no reason why Scott should put any kind of disclaimer on the Mall site. It would have to list every food know to man. As others have said people need to find out what their own individual intolerances are, if they have any, and avoid those foods.
  • 6
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#25 DogWalkerNYC

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 11:05 AM

I don't know if the GFS guy is the one who wants you to buy his products. All I did was sign up for a free newsletter. I don't know the organization or the guy. But if this info is correct, I don't care if this guy stands in the middle of Broadway spitting nickles to make a living. I am grateful to him for information that may finally help my hives resolve.
  • 0
Laura Grace

65 years old. Diagnosed with GERD at age 63. Started feeling bloated after eating bread & rolls in 2012. After doing online research ate gluten-free for a week & symptoms resolved. Symptoms returned when I glutened. That's good enough for me. Because testing is often inconclusive will not get tested. In 2012 had colonoscopy and endoscopy which showed no damage to the villi. In February, 2013 had capsule endoscopy which showed no damage to the villi or intestines. Diagnosed by gastroenterologist with 'probable non-Celiac sensitivity. Time to get serious before damage occurs.

#26 sreese68

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 12:07 PM

For those of you who are eating corn and feeling great, I read on this, and other forums, that if you are a true celiac even the smallest amount of gluten can cause damage to your intestines, whether or not you feel the damage. If corn contains gluten aren't you concerned about that? If not, why?


As I understand it, all grass family seeds contain gluten. This includes wheat, rye, barley, rice, corn, oats, etc. I want to say sorghum does, too, but I'm not actually sure. HOWEVER, MOST people with celiac only react to the type of gluten in wheat, rye, and barley. The glutens in wheat are called gliadin and glutenin. (Can't remember if rye and barley's glutens have a different name. Sorry!) So technically, we should specifically be avoiding gliadin and glutenin instead of all glutens. Corn gluten, rice gluten, and oat gluten (someone can supply the specific name for me! LOL!) are all different proteins and most celiacs don't react to them. Much like how someone who reacts to beef doesn't react to pork. They're both meat, but they have different compositions. Does that make sense?

So my body doesn't freak out when I eat the gluten in corn. Or white rice.
  • 4
Sharon
gluten-free March 2011
Failed gluten challenge May 2011
Diagnosed celiac 5/25/11

#27 admin

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 12:21 PM

One of the basic tenants of a celiac diagnosis is to also try and exclusionary diet to find other foods that might cause you issues, as many celiacs also react to milk, corn, oats, soy, etc., but these are considered separate intolerance issues and not part of celiac disease. The fact that some celiacs can't tolerate corn is not new news, and I've writing about this for many years on this site.

Take care,
Scott

PS - Which is why on The Gluten-Free Mall you can filter out those items and sort products by those other ingredients.
  • 8
Scott Adams
Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator
Founder Gluten-Free Mall
Founder Celiac.com

#28 DogWalkerNYC

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 12:56 PM

Below is a blurb from an article by Dr. Manik G. Hiranandani about corn gluten. Dr. H. graduated in medicine from the Armed Forces in Pune India in 1980. He then trained in cardiology and internal medicine at Bombay University. To read the entire article go to:
My link

For those of you still saying 'we are responsible, etc.' please read my earlier posts. The experts are as responsible as we are. And for those of you bashing GFS because 'the guy sells his own products', I'm sure you've heard of the very famous Dr. Andrew Weil, from Harvard Medical School, who, among other things, sells products, books, etc. Are you suggesting because he does those things Dr. Weil is not a man to be respected? I hope your thinking is broader than that.

I am just a fellow sufferer trying to make sense of all of this. Part of having food issues involves finding trustworthy sources of info and products. It is unethical not to notify the people who buy your products that some of your customers may have problems with some of your products. You can choose to argue that point, and many of you have. But as a business owner myself I am telling you it is unethical not to post a disclaimer about products you're selling which might, eventually, kill some of your customers.

Here is the blurb from Dr. H. about corn gluten:

Types of Gluten allergy

There appear to be 2 types of gluten allergies. In type 1 gluten allergy the patient is allergic to the gluten in wheat and corn and can tolerate the gluten in oats, barley and rye. This is usually acquired later in life and is due to pesticide residues in the wheat and corn.

Type 2 gluten allergy is the more severe type. In this the patient is allergic to the gluten in wheat, corn oats, barley and rye . All these substances need to be avoided. This usually begins in the early months of infancy when wheat based foods are introduced and usually lasts through life.

Gluten allergy is rarely suspected or diagnosed, and can cause a wide range of problems like indigestion, gas, flatulence, stomach pain, hyperacidity, diarrhoea, Ulcerative colitis, peptic ulcers, hyperactive or aggressive behaviour, dyslexia, backaches, fatigue, chronic fatigue syndrome, muscle pains, cancer of the muscles (Sarcomas), cancer of the lymph nodes, diabetes, asthma, infertility, eczema, depression, epilepsy, loss of memory, abnormal behaviour including schizophrenia.

When we eat food containing wheat or corn which contains pesticides, the body may create antibodies to certain specific segments of their main protein called gluten. Every grain has it's own type of gluten. The gluten in wheat & corn are similar and usually a cross allergy exists between them. Gluten is also present in other grains like oats, barley & rye. Fortunately as pesticide usage in these grains is less than for wheat and corn, allergy to these types of gluten is uncommon and these grains may often be safely used as a substitute for wheat and corn. Your physician can advise you about whether these grains are appropriate for you to eat.

Allergy to wheat and corn is increasingly seen both in adults and children, due to the widespread use of pesticides and chemical fertilizers in growing these grains. In contrast people who eat organic grain have a much lower incidence of gluten allergy. With safe inputs in agriculture, the grains too will be safe to eat.

In my experience with food allergies over the last 20 years, I have found gluten allergies to be associated with a wide range of illnesses (some of which are mentioned above). Coeliac disease also called Ulcerative colitis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is often associated with gluten allergy.

Fatima was a young lady who had been suffering from bleeding in the stools for over a year. Her haemoglobin was constantly low she was being treated with and steroids without much improvement. I examined her, diagnosed a gluten allergy and advised abstinence from wheat and corn. Over the next year she recovered fully. The only times her symptoms returned over the next 10 years was when she strayed from her diet.

Problems due to gluten allergy, respond well to the complete stopping of wheat and corn and the patient recovers promptly without needing any drugs.
  • 0
Laura Grace

65 years old. Diagnosed with GERD at age 63. Started feeling bloated after eating bread & rolls in 2012. After doing online research ate gluten-free for a week & symptoms resolved. Symptoms returned when I glutened. That's good enough for me. Because testing is often inconclusive will not get tested. In 2012 had colonoscopy and endoscopy which showed no damage to the villi. In February, 2013 had capsule endoscopy which showed no damage to the villi or intestines. Diagnosed by gastroenterologist with 'probable non-Celiac sensitivity. Time to get serious before damage occurs.

#29 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 01:11 PM

I am just a fellow sufferer trying to make sense of all of this. Part of having food issues involves finding trustworthy sources of info and products. It is unethical not to notify the people who buy your products that some of your customers may have problems with some of your products. You can choose to argue that point, and many of you have. But as a business owner myself I am telling you it is unethical not to post a disclaimer about products you're selling which might, eventually, kill some of your customers.


There is a 'disclaimer' on every package of food sold. It is called an ingredient list. If I had a peanut allergy I would expect the label of a product to say it had peanuts. And it would be my responsibility to read that label. I do not expect my local Wegmans to hang a big sign up on the door saying 'We sell products with peanuts'.
  • 5
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#30 ciamarie

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 01:23 PM

I unsub'd from the GFS newsletter, after reading an article that was somewhat alarmist but had almost no references. It was something about many gluten-free foods containing high levels of gluten, I believe. I even left a comment, but it said it was pending approval, I don't know if it was ever approved for posting or not. My comment asked whether the (allegedly gluten-free) items that were tested were labeled as gluten-free, or not? And where were the details on what products were tested, etc.

I decided I didn't find it to be credible.
  • 0
Gluten-free since the end of October 2011




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