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Bread Machine


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13 replies to this topic

#1 june27

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 05:53 PM

I was diagnosed with celiac about 5 months ago. Since then, I have been very good about staying on a gluten free diet. While I have not been craving bread, there are times when a nice slice of bread would be great. I have not always heard great things about gluten-free bread in the market, and was not impressed by the one loaf that I did try.

I am considering purchasing a bread machine in hopes of making some bread on those days that I want it. I have been reading a lot of older posts, but many of them seem dated so I thought it was worth asking the question. It seems like the two favorite machines are Breadman and Zojirushi. It also sounds like a dedicated "gluten-free" setting might not be necessary. My preference would be to get one of the 1 lb (instead of 2 lb) machines, but I am concerned that I might run into issues (mostly because I don't know much about them), and it sounds like having 2 paddles is a plus (not sure if that is for 2lb only).

Any advice/information (including perks/drawbacks) that folks could pass along to help with the decision of which to buy would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
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#2 Darn210

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 06:17 PM

You're probably not going to like this . . . but my advice would be to skip the bread machine and get yourself a Kitchen aid mixer. I got both in the beginning. I use the KitchenAid all the time. The bread machine hasn't made it out of the pantry in a couple of years.

The KitchenAid can handle mixing gluten free bread dough. Unlike gluten bread, gluten free bread dough doesn't require the mix/kneed/rise/punch-down/rise/form-into-a-loaf/rise/bake cycle. Gluten free bread (at least the mixes/recipes that I have used) use a mix/pour-into-pan/rise/bake cycle. All the labor is up front and you can do it with your mixer. . .and your mixer is way more versatile.


. . . and if you're still intent on a bread machine, I've got a Cuisinart that's barely been used and only for gluten-free breads that I'm willing to sell you :P For what it's worth, as a bread machine I did like it. It was a CBK-200
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#3 Marilyn R

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 07:30 PM

Hi June,

Try Chebe mix before buying a bread machine if you can tolerate egg and dairy.

It's really tasty and easy to mix up by hand. Do follow the directions and don't add more liquid than the 1/4 cup it calls for.
(You can cut back on the amount of cheese though.)

I mix it up and kneed it in a big bowl, then bake it on my holy pizza pan with a piece of parchment paper.

If you make it into 5 buns vs. the 4 the instructions tell you, you can freeze your left overs and they'll fit in a toaster. You pop a bun in the toaster and have an awesome cheese bun on the run for a BLT, breakfast sandwich, or whatever your heart desires.

Sometimes I make the buns in heart shapes, cuz I love it so much.

I used to paint the tops with olive oil so they'd brown better, but I forego that step now.

And I concur about the stand mixer vs. bread maker suggestion, but I personally don't own a bread maker, so don't know if I'm giving informed advice.
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Positive improvement from elimination diet. Mother dx'd by Mayo Clinic in late 1980s. Negative blood tests and Upper & Lower GI biopsy. Parathyroidectomy 12/09. Recurring high calcium level 4/10. Gluten-free 4/10. Soy & Dairy Free 6/10. Corn free 7/10. Grain free except rice 8/10. Legume free 6/11. Fighting the battle of the battle within myself, and I'm going to win!

As of 2/12, tolerating dairy, corn, legumes and some soy, but I limit soy to tamari sauce or modest soy additives. Won't ever try quinoa again!

Discoid Lupus from skin biopsy 2011, discovered 2/12 when picking up medical records. Systemic Lupus Dx 6/12. Shingles 10/12.

#4 Jestgar

 
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Posted 21 July 2012 - 07:39 PM

I don't have a stand mixer, but I just bought a bread machine at a rummage sale. It's an old Oster, has no gluten-free setting. I also have a bunch of Pamela's bread mixes. The machine does 1, and 1+1/2 pound loaves, Pamela's is for 2 pound loaves. I measure out half the mix at a time and it works just fine.

I like the smaller loaves because I just don't eat that much bread, and a small one lasts 3 or 4 days.
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#5 fantasticalice

 
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Posted 22 July 2012 - 04:24 AM

Make sure you can take the thing back!

This bread maker is for gluten-free bread but I bet you still have to watch it and scrape it down!

http://www.costco.co...MultiItemViewCP

$350 and you can eat bread, if you are lucky. I have never tried this thing but you can google reviews.
I found that you still had to mess with the bread! Try banana bread and add yeast for a high rise!? You
could do the same with cornbread. I just made a cornbread with zucchini, flax, chia, hemp seed, only
using corn flour, yum! I even added apricots!
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#6 june27

 
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Posted 22 July 2012 - 05:13 AM

You're probably not going to like this . . . but my advice would be to skip the bread machine and get yourself a Kitchen aid mixer. I got both in the beginning. I use the KitchenAid all the time. The bread machine hasn't made it out of the pantry in a couple of years.

The KitchenAid can handle mixing gluten free bread dough. Unlike gluten bread, gluten free bread dough doesn't require the mix/kneed/rise/punch-down/rise/form-into-a-loaf/rise/bake cycle. Gluten free bread (at least the mixes/recipes that I have used) use a mix/pour-into-pan/rise/bake cycle. All the labor is up front and you can do it with your mixer. . .and your mixer is way more versatile.


. . . and if you're still intent on a bread machine, I've got a Cuisinart that's barely been used and only for gluten-free breads that I'm willing to sell you :P For what it's worth, as a bread machine I did like it. It was a CBK-200


You know, I had considered that as well. Is the reason to not just use a standard hand mixer? I am guessing that the dough might be so thick that it is hard work for the hand mixer, or possibly that the Kitchen Aid is easier to control that you don't mix it too much?

I think the only benefit for the bread machine is it sounds like there is less chance of user error with the yeast. I made a box of 1-2-3 gluten free yeast rolls and they were terrible (cockpit problems, I am sure) - so I think I am just a bit gun-shy. If I can figure out how to work with yeast, buying a Kitchen Aid seems like a much better investment too.
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#7 sa1937

 
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Posted 22 July 2012 - 05:20 AM

You know, I had considered that as well. Is the reason to not just use a standard hand mixer? I am guessing that the dough might be so thick that it is hard work for the hand mixer, or possibly that the Kitchen Aid is easier to control that you don't mix it too much?

I think the only benefit for the bread machine is it sounds like there is less chance of user error with the yeast. I made a box of 1-2-3 gluten free yeast rolls and they were terrible (cockpit problems, I am sure) - so I think I am just a bit gun-shy. If I can figure out how to work with yeast, buying a Kitchen Aid seems like a much better investment too.

When I first went gluten-free, I tried making a loaf of bread with my handheld mixer. I had a terrible time with it...the batter climbed the beaters and it didn't turn out very well. Some gluten-free bread recipes call for beating it on high for 3 or 4 minutes. I don't have that kind of stamina either.

I also debated between buying a KA mixer or a bread machine. I decided on the KA as I felt it would be far more versatile and it was the right decision for me.
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#8 sa1937

 
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Posted 22 July 2012 - 05:24 AM

Make sure you can take the thing back!

This bread maker is for gluten-free bread but I bet you still have to watch it and scrape it down!

http://www.costco.co...MultiItemViewCP

$350 and you can eat bread, if you are lucky. I have never tried this thing but you can google reviews.
I found that you still had to mess with the bread! Try banana bread and add yeast for a high rise!? You
could do the same with cornbread. I just made a cornbread with zucchini, flax, chia, hemp seed, only
using corn flour, yum! I even added apricots!

Doesn't the Bready require you to use their own mixes?

Interesting thought on adding yeast to banana bread or cornbread. Do you then have to let it rise like a regular yeast bread recipe? I'm all for high rises!!! Posted Image
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Sylvia
Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009
Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010
Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

#9 Darn210

 
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Posted 22 July 2012 - 06:54 AM

While the gluten-free bread dough is much "thinner" than gluten bread dough, it's a pretty thick dough-like batter. I think it would burn up your hand mixer . . . maybe not the first or second time . . . but sooner than later . . . also depends on the quality of your hand mixer. I've got my kitchenAid and I've also got a cheapy (and I mean CHEAPY!) hand mixer.

Also, unlike gluten dough, I don't think you can "overwork" gluten free dough. When you overwork gluten bread dough, you are breaking down the gluten/gluten bonds that provide all that nice fluffiness. No gluten in gluten free bread, so you can't really mess that part up ;)

The part that you can mess up is the yeast. Make sure you use warm water to get it activated . . . but hot water can kill it . . . just a little warmer than your skin temperature. I never had problems getting my gluten bread dough to rise just sitting on the counter. The gluten free bread dough is a little more reluctant for me. I do better if I warm my oven to a hundred degrees or so and then shut it off. Then let my bread/rolls rise in the oven.

Good luck . . . ask us lots of questions. We can all share our experiences. However, I will say that sometimes it is a matter of trial and error. I made some pretty inedible bread in the beginning :)



Also, have you noticed how expensive it is to buy gluten-free bread crumbs? Baking mistakes are a great way to generate some bread crumbs. As long as it isn't charred, and you weren't making some kind of cranberry banana chocolate chip bread, and the taste is not revolting, use a food processer and pulverize those "oopses" into crumbs and store in your freezer.
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#10 Marilyn R

 
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Posted 22 July 2012 - 08:53 PM

You could buy over 100 packages of Chebe bread mix, use a fork or spoon and your hands for less than it costs to buy a Kitchen Aide. (For the record, I have a KA) Just food for thought, so to speak. ;)
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Positive improvement from elimination diet. Mother dx'd by Mayo Clinic in late 1980s. Negative blood tests and Upper & Lower GI biopsy. Parathyroidectomy 12/09. Recurring high calcium level 4/10. Gluten-free 4/10. Soy & Dairy Free 6/10. Corn free 7/10. Grain free except rice 8/10. Legume free 6/11. Fighting the battle of the battle within myself, and I'm going to win!

As of 2/12, tolerating dairy, corn, legumes and some soy, but I limit soy to tamari sauce or modest soy additives. Won't ever try quinoa again!

Discoid Lupus from skin biopsy 2011, discovered 2/12 when picking up medical records. Systemic Lupus Dx 6/12. Shingles 10/12.

#11 SensitiveMe

 
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Posted 24 July 2012 - 06:00 PM

I was told by someone at King Arthur flour that a stand mixer is preferred over a hand mixer because it incorporates more air into the batter which you need in order for it to rise properly. I called them after I had to go glutenfree and they don't recommend a bread machine for gluten free bread. But I had only recently bought a new 2 lb. Zojirushi machine and so attempted using it. I still use it because of convenience only. If my circumstances were different I would much prefer to make my own bread using a stand mixer.

I have used bread machines for years and while I think a Zojirushi is best for wheat bread it is not suitable to me for gluten free bread because it has 3 rises. I have both a 2 lb. and the smaller 1 lb. machines. A 1 lb. bread will cook better but my machine is not usable because I can't program in my own settings and gluten free bread should have only one rise in a machine or it will end up falling and then not rising enough. I make bread in my 2 lb. machine where I program in Preheat time 15 min., Knead time 25 minutes, turn off Rise 1 and Rise 2, Rise 3 time 55 minutes, Bake time 60 minutes and I am still playing with these settings at present. I really don't like their recommended recipe of all brown rice flour and changed it to a mixture of King Arthur gluten free all purpose flour with 25 percent sorghum flour. I also have to mix all the liquid ingredients together first and put them in there, then mix all the dry ingredients together and put them in next, then make a little dent in the dry ingredients to add in the yeast and make sure it doesn't get moistened by the liquid ingredients. And then I still have to watch it and stir the ingredients down because it doesn't mix down and dry ingredients stay on the sides of the bread pan. I cut the 2 lb. loaf in half and put one in the fridge and the other in the freezer. I am still trying also to improve on the ingredients but bread machines are not very forgiving and gluten free mixes and flours are expensive so I go slowly and carefully adjusting things.

The 1 lb. smaller machine has a large paddle which always left a big hole in the bread and I felt it did not mix things well because the bread pan is tall and narrow. I bought it years ago because it was supposed to be a space saver and yes it does save space but doesn't mix well enough for me and the paddle was always stuck in the bread and too much of the bread unusable to slice. I once tried making a cake in it as they said I could and followed their recipe but it didn't come out well at all and wasn't mixed together enough. It also has a jam setting so at least now I can use it to make jam.
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#12 june27

 
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Posted 24 July 2012 - 06:14 PM

Thanks everyone for the posts. It definitely sounds like a stand mixer is the better way to go.

After telling my boyfriend about this decision process, he mentioned that he has his grandmother's old stand mixer. I am going to take a look at it, and see if is possible to give it a good scrub and remove any remnants of gluten that might be hanging around. Otherwise, I'll be off to purchase a new one :)

Thanks for the input!
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#13 Adalaide

 
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Posted 24 July 2012 - 06:57 PM

Keep in mind when cleaning the old mixer to find a way to clean out the fan or whatever. Otherwise it'll just blow gluten all over the place. I just replaced my hand mixer because it wasn't worth the trouble against the cost, but for something like a Kitchen Aid or other quality stand mixer, where there is a will there is a way.
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#14 june27

 
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Posted 25 July 2012 - 08:01 AM

Wow, I never would have thought of that....I'll do my best :)
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