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Eating gluten-free And Gaining Weight


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#16 luvrdeo

 
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Posted 04 September 2012 - 10:52 AM

In my experience (and everyone is different) I swelled up (water) off and in the first 6 months of gluten-free.

I was dealing with recovering from steroids as well as Hashis - which may or may not have been a part of it...but I did notice a few times bloating up after gluten exposure, which was very difficult for me to determine newly gluten-free. And then there was the DH thing, and the low blood sugar thing, and the eating all the time thing...

The beginning is a mess. I suggest mild exercise - walking, etc. to the level it makes you feel good. Also, you may examine if you are eating a balance of food (sometimes we develop crutches going gluten-free - mine was Junior Mints and Gelato).

My guess is that you will go through 200 more changes in the next 6 months. Hang on!


Thanks for the good advice - I too am recovering from steroids after they found colitis - the whole reason celiacs was even tested for! I've been sick for a good 15 years before anyone would actually listen to me that this wasn't ALL stress related. It's just been a rough 2 weeks, and I wasn't sure if this was normal. I keep saying I'll get back to my workout routine but I haven't had the energy. The one thing I know I'm lacking is protein, so I'm trying to get back on track there...and I'm 100% guilty of grabbing a handful of chocolate chips every night, if I didn't I'm afraid I'd binge elsewhere! I just hate this feeling, it's very frustrating as I'm sure everyone has felt at some point. I look forward to the day when I feel normal again :)
  • 0
lymphocytic colitis 8/1/12
diagnosed w/celiacs 8/14/12
gluten-free 8/14/12
dairy free, grain free, corn free 10/9/12

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#17 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 04 September 2012 - 12:11 PM

Thanks for the good advice - I too am recovering from steroids after they found colitis - the whole reason celiacs was even tested for! I've been sick for a good 15 years before anyone would actually listen to me that this wasn't ALL stress related. It's just been a rough 2 weeks, and I wasn't sure if this was normal. I keep saying I'll get back to my workout routine but I haven't had the energy. The one thing I know I'm lacking is protein, so I'm trying to get back on track there...and I'm 100% guilty of grabbing a handful of chocolate chips every night, if I didn't I'm afraid I'd binge elsewhere! I just hate this feeling, it's very frustrating as I'm sure everyone has felt at some point. I look forward to the day when I feel normal again :)


Don't beat yourself up over a handful of chocolate chips. Seriously. Acclimating to the gluten-free diet is harrowing and a crutch is much needed, IMO. The hard part is accepting, at least for a while, that your body is a runaway freight train and you are merely along for the ride. Sure, you can do the obvious right things (and you should) but don't expect to convert to a perfectly gluten-free (no cc or mistakes) and whole foods diet overnight. It takes time for most.

And don't be surprised if you drastically lose that same weight in a week.

Then gain it back.

The first six months are weird.
  • 0
Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
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Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#18 luvrdeo

 
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Posted 04 September 2012 - 02:07 PM

Don't beat yourself up over a handful of chocolate chips. Seriously. Acclimating to the gluten-free diet is harrowing and a crutch is much needed, IMO. The hard part is accepting, at least for a while, that your body is a runaway freight train and you are merely along for the ride. Sure, you can do the obvious right things (and you should) but don't expect to convert to a perfectly gluten-free (no cc or mistakes) and whole foods diet overnight. It takes time for most.

And don't be surprised if you drastically lose that same weight in a week.

Then gain it back.

The first six months are weird.


Good to know! :) I didn't expect this to be such an ordeal...it's just gluten, right?! I had NO idea what all this entailed before I was diagnosed. I'm thankful for this message board, as most people around me don't understand these "withdrawal" symptoms and why I'm not feeling 100% already. Because mine has gone on sooooo long undiagnosed, I expect it will take some serious time. And the choco-chips...I'd never beat myself up over that! I have a sweet tooth and that's my reward at the end of the day for giving up gluten! :)
  • 0
lymphocytic colitis 8/1/12
diagnosed w/celiacs 8/14/12
gluten-free 8/14/12
dairy free, grain free, corn free 10/9/12

#19 Coryad

 
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Posted 18 September 2012 - 10:47 AM

This is so reassuring. I have been gluten-free for about 4 months and haven't lost a pound either. BUT I am using things like plain potato chips and plain white rice to get me through. I'm going to get more fresh foods in the house so they are available instead of junk. I did notice that a lot of the prepared gluten-free foods are not very healthy as far as fat & calories go, so I've eliminated most of them. Now if I could just keep those Lays out of my pantry ;)


Don't beat yourself up over a handful of chocolate chips. Seriously. Acclimating to the gluten-free diet is harrowing and a crutch is much needed, IMO. The hard part is accepting, at least for a while, that your body is a runaway freight train and you are merely along for the ride. Sure, you can do the obvious right things (and you should) but don't expect to convert to a perfectly gluten-free (no cc or mistakes) and whole foods diet overnight. It takes time for most.

And don't be surprised if you drastically lose that same weight in a week.

Then gain it back.

The first six months are weird.


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Cory

Diagnosed Celiac 4/12 due to DH
Eliminated food molds 1/12

#20 luvrdeo

 
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Posted 18 September 2012 - 11:09 AM

This is so reassuring. I have been gluten-free for about 4 months and haven't lost a pound either. BUT I am using things like plain potato chips and plain white rice to get me through. I'm going to get more fresh foods in the house so they are available instead of junk. I did notice that a lot of the prepared gluten-free foods are not very healthy as far as fat & calories go, so I've eliminated most of them. Now if I could just keep those Lays out of my pantry ;)


I've cut out most starches to try and help the weight loss. I'm also battling extreme fatigue so that isn't working in my favor! Too bad this wasn't easier haha!! :P I finally stopped buying my tortilla chips that I live on...it's been tough, but I'm hoping it is worth it.
  • 0
lymphocytic colitis 8/1/12
diagnosed w/celiacs 8/14/12
gluten-free 8/14/12
dairy free, grain free, corn free 10/9/12

#21 Iguana

 
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Posted 21 September 2012 - 07:43 AM

I'm on the diet since 1,5 month and gained 6 kilos in the first 4 weeks. I was shocked. I think its mostly due to all those gluten free cakes I started eating to overcompensate - they contain huge amount of calories and almost no fibres :/
Doctor also said that my body started to absorb more nutritients... I cut the cakes and managed to stop gaining weight... I hope I will manage to loose some too...
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#22 Jjphr

 
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Posted 27 September 2012 - 06:34 PM

I was diagnosed in October 2010 and gained 20 pounds in about six months. I tried everything and finally found something that worked! Count your calories using my fitness pal and do cardio every day! I have lost 10 pounds and plan to lose the other 10, I just got a little burned out. Exercising every day is a huge commitment!
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#23 luvrdeo

 
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Posted 28 September 2012 - 05:59 AM

I was diagnosed in October 2010 and gained 20 pounds in about six months. I tried everything and finally found something that worked! Count your calories using my fitness pal and do cardio every day! I have lost 10 pounds and plan to lose the other 10, I just got a little burned out. Exercising every day is a huge commitment!

I used to be hard core into my fitness, but my energy levels are soooooo low, it's hard to get my house vacuumed these days. I can tell you how many calories are in any food out there, because I've always been THAT into working out and my fitness. For 10+ years I've had a personal trainer, I know enough I could train others at this point. Never in my life have I struggled with weight until now. I swear my metabolism is non-existent. Kudo's to you, exercising every day is a big commitment, one I've always had until these last few months!
  • 0
lymphocytic colitis 8/1/12
diagnosed w/celiacs 8/14/12
gluten-free 8/14/12
dairy free, grain free, corn free 10/9/12

#24 parmeisan

 
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Posted 28 September 2012 - 01:15 PM

I had heard before that to lose weight, you only had to eat fewer calories than you burned... but I never really believed it was that simple. It is, actually. There's more to being healthy - nutrients, etc - but there are exactly two ways to lose weight:

1. Exercise more
2. Eat fewer calories

Exercising is great, but it only gains you like 200 calories for a lot of time & effort... whereas a tiny, tiny bag of chips is over 300 calories. So controlling diet is actually the easier way, at least at first (exercising helps your metabolism get better, so it's good for the long run).

I am telling you this fresh off of having lost 10 pounds myself (and still going) so I hope you believe me when I say, it's not as hard as you might think: try counting your calories. For one week, even - you only have to keep going if you really want to. For one week, write down everything you eat. There are completely free websites that can help you do this, and they're super easy to use. Most of them have apps so you can do it from your phone. (I use MyFitnessPal, but there are others).

This does several things:

a) Makes you think twice about eating something, since you have to mark it down.
b) Helps you to realize where your problem areas are. (I never knew *just* how many veggies you need to eat to match a cup of rice. Sure, you're not as full from veggies, but subtract just a little rice and add some carrots, and you're golden).
c) Makes you feel less guilty about the "bad" things you eat. There is no cheating - just eat a little less elsewhere. No worries.
d) Gives you more motivation to eat less. Back when I didn't think about it, I'd eat 3 links of sausage without blinking. Now I know that that's 750 calories! No thanks, I'll just eat one, and supplement it with something else. Or butter on popcorn! It just about triples the calorie value! Maybe I'll have just a little less of that...
e) Motivation to exercise. You get free eating later when you do!

Do that for a week, and you'll learn so much that you probably won't need to keep doing it. (Although it gets easier because the app will remember the things you eat a lot or have eaten recently).

Good luck!
  • 0
29 years old
Migraines my whole life
Diagnosed Anemic in ~2003
Diagnosed GAD in ~2005
Non-ulcer stomach issues in ~2006
Major acid reflux issues in 2012
Positive blood test for Celiac in 2012, biopsy scheduled

#25 parmeisan

 
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Posted 28 September 2012 - 01:18 PM

Oops, I guess I'm not the first to say that. Still true.

Also, if you're using MyFitnessPal - note that it lets you enter recipes. It was much easier to put in the mixed cereal I eat every morning once I realized I could do it that way, instead of selecting all the items again or copying over the meal. That way, you can eat more or less of it each day without altering every single ingredient.


PS. I do know how hard it is to find motivation for this sort of thing when you are in gluten withdrawal or just feeling fatigued. If you're not there yet, put in on a shelf in your mind and do it later. There's no hurry. You'll feel better soon.

Edited by parmeisan, 28 September 2012 - 01:23 PM.

  • 0
29 years old
Migraines my whole life
Diagnosed Anemic in ~2003
Diagnosed GAD in ~2005
Non-ulcer stomach issues in ~2006
Major acid reflux issues in 2012
Positive blood test for Celiac in 2012, biopsy scheduled

#26 luvrdeo

 
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Posted 28 September 2012 - 02:30 PM

I had heard before that to lose weight, you only had to eat fewer calories than you burned... but I never really believed it was that simple. It is, actually. There's more to being healthy - nutrients, etc - but there are exactly two ways to lose weight:

1. Exercise more
2. Eat fewer calories

Exercising is great, but it only gains you like 200 calories for a lot of time & effort... whereas a tiny, tiny bag of chips is over 300 calories. So controlling diet is actually the easier way, at least at first (exercising helps your metabolism get better, so it's good for the long run).

I am telling you this fresh off of having lost 10 pounds myself (and still going) so I hope you believe me when I say, it's not as hard as you might think: try counting your calories. For one week, even - you only have to keep going if you really want to. For one week, write down everything you eat. There are completely free websites that can help you do this, and they're super easy to use. Most of them have apps so you can do it from your phone. (I use MyFitnessPal, but there are others).

This does several things:

a) Makes you think twice about eating something, since you have to mark it down.
B) Helps you to realize where your problem areas are. (I never knew *just* how many veggies you need to eat to match a cup of rice. Sure, you're not as full from veggies, but subtract just a little rice and add some carrots, and you're golden).
c) Makes you feel less guilty about the "bad" things you eat. There is no cheating - just eat a little less elsewhere. No worries.
d) Gives you more motivation to eat less. Back when I didn't think about it, I'd eat 3 links of sausage without blinking. Now I know that that's 750 calories! No thanks, I'll just eat one, and supplement it with something else. Or butter on popcorn! It just about triples the calorie value! Maybe I'll have just a little less of that...
e) Motivation to exercise. You get free eating later when you do!

Do that for a week, and you'll learn so much that you probably won't need to keep doing it. (Although it gets easier because the app will remember the things you eat a lot or have eaten recently).

Good luck!

I mentioned above, I've had a personal trainer for 10+ years, and 110% know how to eat properly, and how many calories to take in to be in a deficit and lose weight. I am (was) the queen of working out and being in amazing shape. My problem is, I have ZERO and I mean ZERO energy since this all started. So, to make up for the fact that I can't drag myself to the gym, my diet, which was low-calorie and ridiculously clean to begin with, is now even leaner than ever before. I eat hard boiled eggs for breakfast, an apple for a snack, turkey, sweet potato and 1/2 an avocado for lunch, a protein shake for an afternoon snack, and broiled salmon, 1/2 cup of rice and steamed veggies for dinner. No salt, no butter, no junk whatsoever. It's around 1200 calories, and about as clean as you can get.

Congrats on losing 10 lbs though, that's great!

Oh and I can use myfitnesspal in my sleep, it's been drilled into me for years by my trainer! Great site!! :D
  • 0
lymphocytic colitis 8/1/12
diagnosed w/celiacs 8/14/12
gluten-free 8/14/12
dairy free, grain free, corn free 10/9/12

#27 parmeisan

 
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Posted 28 September 2012 - 02:42 PM

Just wanted to say that most of that was for the original poster. After having read through the thread more (yeah, I should have done it first) I did add some more. This (editted in, so you might have missed it) was mostly for you:

PS. I do know how hard it is to find motivation for this sort of thing when you are in gluten withdrawal or just feeling fatigued. If you're not there yet, put in on a shelf in your mind and do it later. There's no hurry. You'll feel better soon.


You said you're pretty new at gluten-free, right? I think that it's probably just going to take some time before you get the energy levels you're used to having. If they don't end up coming back, then something else is the problem: that level of fatigue is not normal. (Although I'm sure most of us went through a stage where we thought it was). Figure out what's sapping your energies, and I'm sure you'll be just fine.
  • 0
29 years old
Migraines my whole life
Diagnosed Anemic in ~2003
Diagnosed GAD in ~2005
Non-ulcer stomach issues in ~2006
Major acid reflux issues in 2012
Positive blood test for Celiac in 2012, biopsy scheduled

#28 luvrdeo

 
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Posted 28 September 2012 - 02:53 PM

Just wanted to say that most of that was for the original poster. After having read through the thread more (yeah, I should have done it first) I did add some more. This (editted in, so you might have missed it) was mostly for you:



You said you're pretty new at gluten-free, right? I think that it's probably just going to take some time before you get the energy levels you're used to having. If they don't end up coming back, then something else is the problem: that level of fatigue is not normal. (Although I'm sure most of us went through a stage where we thought it was). Figure out what's sapping your energies, and I'm sure you'll be just fine.

Luckily I go back to the doctor next week, as I don't think how I'm feeling is normal. No one my age should be grounded to the couch on the weekends!! I apologize, I thought you were referring directly to me, and I used to live in the gym, so feeling this way is terribly hard for me right now! Yes I'm fairly new, and unfortunately, have gotten no relief from removing gluten. Hopefully I get more answers next week!
  • 0
lymphocytic colitis 8/1/12
diagnosed w/celiacs 8/14/12
gluten-free 8/14/12
dairy free, grain free, corn free 10/9/12


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