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Very New To Gluten Free Baking - Basic Questions


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#1 CHunter

 
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Posted 27 July 2012 - 04:07 PM

My son's test is very likely to come back positive since there was a family history I was unaware of. I'm trying to find recipes and what I have found for bread, one of my sons favorite foods, is that they call for dried dairy products. Is this normal and if so why, or should I keep looking?
I apologize I'm sure these questions are ignorant but I have only known about the disease for a day. I know Gluten free diets have been around for a while but I don't believe in any kind of diets I have always chose to just eat healthier (cutting out sweets and fatty foods) when there was need to cut weight, hence all of this is very new.
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#2 love2travel

 
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Posted 27 July 2012 - 05:32 PM

My son's test is very likely to come back positive since there was a family history I was unaware of. I'm trying to find recipes and what I have found for bread, one of my sons favorite foods, is that they call for dried dairy products. Is this normal and if so why, or should I keep looking?
I apologize I'm sure these questions are ignorant but I have only known about the disease for a day. I know Gluten free diets have been around for a while but I don't believe in any kind of diets I have always chose to just eat healthier (cutting out sweets and fatty foods) when there was need to cut weight, hence all of this is very new.

Hi and welcome! :) Just know that gluten-free bread does not even come close to the gluten version. Sorry, but it is unfortunately true. The first time I made it I cried, spreading it into the pan rather than kneading it. But there are some decent versions out there. You may want to try Kinnickinnik's new soft bread, Udi's or Rudi's. Glutino Genius is also pretty good. Anyway, some scratch bread recipes call for dry dairy and many wet and some without dairy. All sorts of possibilities. What type of bread does your son like? White or multi-grain or other?
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#3 lpellegr

 
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Posted 29 July 2012 - 06:02 AM

The dry milk they add is to increase the amount of protein, since most of the substitutes (especially rice, tapioca, and potato flours) don't have much protein, and it helps the bread retain its structure.

You have to know that you will probably never find any replacement bread, especially homemade, that has the soft, spongy texture of store-bought white bread, or the ability to stay fresh on the shelf for long. This will be a disappointment at first, but you will either eventually get used to this kind of bread or you will decide that it's not worth eating bread that isn't good. Many of us learn to eat sandwich fillings that aren't between two pieces of bread, but on a plate or rolled in a corn tortilla or scooped up with crackers or celery. If you are determined to keep eating as much bread as you are used to, then try all the different kinds that are commercially available and see what you like (look on this forum for recommendations). If you want to try making your own, start with mixes before going out and spending money on xanthan gum and 12 different flours. At least you don't have to knead (you couldn't if you wanted to, because it will be sticky)!

This forum will be very helpful, but there are also books out there that can educate you, and lots and lots of cookbooks. This seems very daunting, but eventually will be second nature, hard as that may be to believe now.
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Lee

I never liked bread anyway.....




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