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Being Celiac In America Is Unacceptable!


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38 replies to this topic

#16 eatmeat4good

 
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Posted 05 August 2012 - 10:14 PM

Everyone may have and express an opinion, but let's keep in mind Rule #1 please.

Rule #1-Do not be abusive or otherwise out of line towards other board members.
Show respect for each board member, no matter what you think of their views. This is not a place to quarrel.
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#17 weluvgators

 
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Posted 06 August 2012 - 05:30 AM

Our family moved from America to Australia, and it has been fabulous. I appreciate the more stringent labelling and inspections in Australia. And best of all is the abundance of "no detectable gluten" food that can be found in so many places here. I really hope that Australia maintains their current standards and that other countries follow their lead.
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My super silly red siren is my guiding light. She has been a tremendous lesson for me in how gluten affects different people in very different ways. She is a super duper silly girl that was simply born that way. I have no idea why I am so blessed to have her guidance.

#18 StephanieL

 
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Posted 06 August 2012 - 07:25 AM

I just wanted to add that if x-con is your major complaint, it isn't any better for people with allergies. The "May contains" and the "processed in a facility" label is voluntary. 100% voluntary. People with allergies have to call all the tie so this isn't just a Celiac issue.
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#19 justlisa

 
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Posted 07 August 2012 - 06:34 AM

Interesting thread...

Personally, I get far "more" out of these discussions than I do with the nicey-nice-politically-correct ones (I don't feel like I can really trust what's being said in the latter)...

While I agree that better labeling would help some people, it would not others... I wouldn't trust it... Being knowledgeable is the best, imo.

Standardized/generalized is part of the problem, isn't it? Isn't that why the medical community is struggling so hard with understanding and dx gluten intolerance?

Btw, I'm going to agree with Gemini on the liability issue... If regulation mandates are implemented that are too restrictive (etc), you're, often, likely to find that companies will back off....even from processes that were being done voluntarily...mandates can become cost prohibitive...

Easy isn't always easy...nor is it safe, imo...

With all of that said, I think the food industry has come a long way...others, not so much (i.e. pharmaceuticals, body products, etc)...
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#20 StephanieL

 
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Posted 07 August 2012 - 08:53 AM

I think so much is the "diversification" of the food industry. If XYZ ONLY made Food A, there wouldn't be all the x-con issues. You would buy X from one place, Y from another and Z from the other.

It is one of the reasons I like companies who "specialize" in one or two things, less risk. We deal with far more than just gluten though.
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#21 Jestgar

 
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Posted 07 August 2012 - 10:05 AM

I have an entirely different take on this.

I think much of what's on the supermarket shelves today should not be labeled "food". I pulled up the ingredients for a couple Oroweat products. Just bread...right? Whole grain goodness...right?

Whole Grain & Flax
Ingredients:
WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR, WATER, SUGAR, WHOLE FLAXSEED, CRACKED WHEAT, WHEAT GLUTEN, RYE, YEAST, SALT, YELLOW CORN GRITS, SOYBEAN OIL, MOLASSES, EXTRACT OF RAISINS, BROWN RICE, OATS, CALCIUM PROPIONATE (2) (PRESERVATIVE), SODIUM STEAROYL LACTYLATE (4), MENHADEN OIL (3), TRITICALE, MONO- AND DIGLYCERIDES, CALCIUM SULFATE, BARLEY, FLAXSEED, MILLET, MODIFIED CORNSTARCH, SOY PROTEIN, SOY LECITHIN, AZODICARBONAMIDE(1).

Hamburger Buns (8 CT)
Ingredients:
WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR, WATER, SUGAR, WHEAT GLUTEN, YEAST, WHEAT BRAN, SOYBEAN OIL, SALT, CALCIUM PROPIONATE (PRESERVATIVE), SODIUM STEAROYL LACTYLATE, CALCIUM SULFATE (5), MONOGLYCERIDES (6), ASCORBIC ACID (DOUGH CONDITIONER), SOY LECITHIN, AZODICARBONAMIDE, DEGERMED YELLOW CORNMEAL, SESAME SEEDS


Yummy....as long as you ignore all the chemical additives:
(1)
(2)
(3) fish oil
(4) (keeps 'em soft)
(5) - gypsum, drierite
(6)

Doritos? mmmm. Their website doesn't even let you copy the ingredient list.
Cheetos? Zoiks!

Are Pringles food? Or a synthetic conglomerate?
Velveeta?

Anyway, my point is, it's easy for us to focus on gluten, because that's what our issue is, however I think it's just a symptom of our messed up food system. If everything labeled "food" contained only ingredients recognizable as food, I think we'd have a lot less trouble with things like contamination, and hidden gluten.

Climbing off the soap box now.

Carry on.
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#22 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 07 August 2012 - 10:23 AM

I think much of what's on the supermarket shelves today should not be labeled "food".

Boy, do I agree with you there Jess. Just because we are able to consume something and not keel over doesn't mean our bodies know what to do with it.
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#23 ~**caselynn**~

 
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Posted 07 August 2012 - 12:06 PM

Anyway, my point is, it's easy for us to focus on gluten, because that's what our issue is, however I think it's just a symptom of our messed up food system. If everything labeled "food" contained only ingredients recognizable as food, I think we'd have a lot less trouble with things like contamination, and hidden gluten.


You're very right with this one, I hardly ever checked out the ingredients list until my diagnosis. Once I was forced to look at everything I was ingesting, I realized just what crap I had been putting in my body. That was an eye opener, who wants to ingest things they can't pronounce? Not me! 😃😃Amazing the things you can learn when you're forced to pay attention! 😃😃
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~**caselynn**~

#24 Razzle Dazzle Brazell

 
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Posted 08 August 2012 - 05:04 PM

Anyway, my point is, it's easy for us to focus on gluten, because that's what our issue is, however I think it's just a symptom of our messed up food system. If everything labeled "food" contained only ingredients recognizable as food, I think we'd have a lot less trouble with things like contamination, and hidden gluten.


I third you on that. We would not be eating mutated or genetically engineered foods that just mess up our immune systems. I am like Caselynn in that I always thought people who ate only organic were just nut cases. I never read labels until I developed sensitivities and allergies. I agree that most of our food is not food.

It is no wonder we are badly nourished and overweight in this country. It is no wonder we are developing cancer at higher rates and autoimmune conditions. Alzheimer's, ADD/ADHD, autism has become an epidemic. Yet we trust the FDA to inform and protect us from all this. These guys know artificial foods are killing us but do not reflect these things. Ultimately it is up to us to insist on healthy living and exposing the hidden poisons that have become like date rape drugs to our health.
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Gluten and Oat Free 6/'12
Dairy, Corn and Yeast free 7/'12
Nightshade Free, Candida diet & low salicylates 8/'12
Nightshades and carbs and sugars limitedly reintroduced, most salicylates now tolerated 9/'12
No longer Reacting to yeasty breads 10/'12
Test confirmed yeast overgrowth, back on Candida diet 11/'12

You only get one life so make it count.

#25 Juliebove

 
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Posted 09 August 2012 - 12:30 AM

As for the dedicated lines, that is often just not feasible! Gluten is not an issue for me but I do have multiple food intolerances as does my daughter. We can no longer eat things that are the Walmart brand and most of the Trader Joe's things are out for us too. These things are made on shared lines. It is a ton cheaper for these companies to have their food made like this. And people want cheap food. Most people wouldn't care if there was maybe some gluten or peanut residue in their tomato sauce or canned peas. But it's not a chance we can take.

As for declaring the gluten, I do wish they would do that but... That could create additonal problems. More and more companies could just slap a "may contain" warning on their products. Even though they may be safe for a celiac to eat, there would be no way they could be sued or whatever by putting that statement on there.

We mostly eat whole foods and cook things ourselves. The few processed foods that we do eat are ones that are clearly labeled. We take no chances.
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#26 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 09 August 2012 - 08:40 AM

I think much of what's on the supermarket shelves today should not be labeled "food".

Yummy....as long as you ignore all the chemical additives:

Anyway, my point is, it's easy for us to focus on gluten, because that's what our issue is, however I think it's just a symptom of our messed up food system.

You are so right. If it weren't for this diagnosis I'd still be eating that stuff without even worrying too much about the consequences.

There are advantages to all this.
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#27 mbrookes

 
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Posted 10 August 2012 - 12:23 PM

I believe it all comes down to personal responsibility. No one but me is responsible for what I eat. I read all labels and make my decisions based on that. If a company doesn't accurately label their products, I just don't buy from them.

I do not think most companies (or, really, any companies) are trying to poison us. They have a responsibility the their stock holders to make a profit. If using dedicated lines would cut deeply into the bottom line, they don't do it. Make your own decisions about what you will or will not eat.
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#28 Chalula88

 
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Posted 20 August 2012 - 01:51 PM

I, like Gemini, have not really had any trouble finding safe foods. I always read every single ingredient every time I purchase a product, even if I've purchased it a hundred times before - this has saved me from a number of glutonings. I buy all of my food from the regular store aisles, not from the "specialty" aisles, with the exception of two products that I order online (bread and pretzels). I have been doing this for years with no problems, and I am severely sensitive to gluten. It will double me over in intense pain within fifteen or twenty minutes of eating. I have never purchased an item that did not list gluten in the ingredients that made me sick. But I took the time to learn how food is made and what ingredients could be a risk to me. I have no problem passing on products that I'm not a hundred percent sure about.

The issue with labeling gluten is much more complex than a lot of people realize. It's far more than just not wanting to do it or not wanting to spend money on ink. The problem is that the companies are buying whatever fillers and starch they can afford, and sometimes it's wheat and sometimes it's corn and sometimes it's potato. Requiring that they label wheat on the ingredient is a major issue because it would require that the company choose the starch or filler that they will always use, which means they are forced to always buy the same product even if the price becomes far higher. Or they can print different labels for every batch of their food that's created, but that's much more expensive than you would think. It saves everyone (including consumers) a lot of money to allow some of these things to not be marked on the label. It would be great if everything didn't revolve around money, but there's nothing we can do to change that. Pestering the companies will only result in them adding labels to all of their food that it may contain wheat just to be safe from getting hounded by gluten free advocates.

I wish labeling was clearer, but I don't expect companies and the government to cater to my needs. I feel that I am perfectly capable of determining what food is and isn't safe for me, and the only foods I've been really uncertain about were foreign foods or really bizarre ingredients. And then I ask or do research before eating it.

In my opinion, the outrageously high prices of certified gluten free products are much more worth getting up in arms about than the mainstream food producers not labeling gluten in the way we'd prefer. Rice is a cheap crop. I can get rice pasta at the local Asian store for about a dollar a box. The rice pasta in the specialty section at my regular grocery store is five to seven times that cost. That upsets me. But mainstream labeling does not.
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#29 ChristineWas

 
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Posted 21 August 2012 - 01:00 AM

A few words in defense of those who are concerned and cautious:

My problem is that I end up getting really sick every time I eat something that was processed in a facility that processes wheat. For example, Amy's "gluten free" line made me sick. No big surprise, since Amy's "gluten free" products are processed in a facility that processes wheat. Since this labeling is voluntary, I believe the point that we are often taking a risk is a valid point. This is why I like to be extra careful and call the manufacturers, even when I can't find a risky ingredient on the list.

I feel like my life would be much easier if some of that labeling was required. And I don't think there is anything wrong with people wanting those kinds of labels for gluten and significant allergens.

I believe people do have varying degrees of sensitivity, as well. My dad and I are both celiacs and we shared a gluten free pizza. I got really sick; he didn't. (This was in a restaurant that also serves regular pizza.) Therefore, I don't put a lot of stock in arguments like: "A bunch of Celiacs eat it all the time and don't get sick." That doesn't guarantee that it is safe for everyone. Also, the risk of cross-contamination isn't a guaranteed presence of gluten every time. Playing with cross-contamination risks is like playing Russian Roulette. You don't get the bullet every time.

I don't think there is a problem with people erring on the side of caution, even if this means they are unnecessarily afraid of things that won't actually hurt them. This is our health we are talking about, and some people have faced serious, long-term consequences due to the damage caused by gluten consumption.

I believe we do more damage by giving false security than we do by causing people to be "overly" cautious. What does anyone stand to lose by giving up a few highly processed items (like the ones some in this discussion have argued hardly qualify as food)?
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#30 Razzle Dazzle Brazell

 
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Posted 21 August 2012 - 03:56 AM

I wish labeling was clearer, but I don't expect companies and the government to cater to my needs. I feel that I am perfectly capable of determining what food is and isn't safe for me, and the only foods I've been really uncertain about were foreign foods or really bizarre ingredients. And then I ask or do research before eating it.


You made some goods points but I think the bottom line is that whether someone has an illmess or not, Everyone deserves to know what is in their food. Everyone in America deserves to know what we are buying. They should cater to us because we are the people buying their products. It is impossible to know whether a food is healthy for anyone if the ingredients and processing method are not disclosed. Mainstream production is the reason why so many people are unhealthy now. People cannot fathom that foods on the shelf could be there if it is truly harmful for their health.

It just depends on how you look at it. I tend to see the bigger picture. If someone taught me about all the chemicals and things in my foods years ago, I may never had gotten so ill.
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Gluten and Oat Free 6/'12
Dairy, Corn and Yeast free 7/'12
Nightshade Free, Candida diet & low salicylates 8/'12
Nightshades and carbs and sugars limitedly reintroduced, most salicylates now tolerated 9/'12
No longer Reacting to yeasty breads 10/'12
Test confirmed yeast overgrowth, back on Candida diet 11/'12

You only get one life so make it count.




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