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Being Celiac In America Is Unacceptable!


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38 replies to this topic

#31 StephanieL

 
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Posted 21 August 2012 - 04:59 PM

Everyone in America deserves to know what we are buying.


If this is the measuring stick of things, you should most likely not buy anything in a box really ;) Whole foods really is the best way to eat.
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#32 Razzle Dazzle Brazell

 
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Posted 22 August 2012 - 01:34 PM

If this is the measuring stick of things, you should most likely not buy anything in a box really ;) Whole foods really is the best way to eat.


Yup pretty much. You cannot trust anyone these days it is a shame. You never really know what you are getting. Companies are greedy and lack values. I think the value system as a whole has been depreciated in America. It seems it used to be that you didn't give/sell anything that you would not be willing to use yourself or make something you would not feed your kids.

I believe in self-accountability but I also believe in responsibility for our neighbor, not just because we may get sued but that it is the right thing to do.If I sold a neighbor some lemonade and did not bother to tell them that I chopped the lemons on the same board I made peanut butter on, I would feel responsible if they became ill for giving them something exposed to peanuts while I know they are extremely allergic.

Companies are made up of People who sell things to People and I do not believe they should be excluded of the same values, morals and responsibilities we expect of our neighbors.
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Gluten and Oat Free 6/'12
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Nightshade Free, Candida diet & low salicylates 8/'12
Nightshades and carbs and sugars limitedly reintroduced, most salicylates now tolerated 9/'12
No longer Reacting to yeasty breads 10/'12
Test confirmed yeast overgrowth, back on Candida diet 11/'12

You only get one life so make it count.

#33 justlisa

 
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Posted 22 August 2012 - 01:49 PM

Yup pretty much. You cannot trust anyone these days it is a shame. You never really know what you are getting. Companies are greedy and lack values. I think the value system as a whole has been depreciated in America. It seems it used to be that you didn't give/sell anything that you would not be willing to use yourself or make something you would not feed your kids.

I believe in self-accountability but I also believe in responsibility for our neighbor, not just because we may get sued but that it is the right thing to do.If I sold a neighbor some lemonade and did not bother to tell them that I chopped the lemons on the same board I made peanut butter on, I would feel responsible if they became ill for giving them something exposed to peanuts while I know they are extremely allergic.

Companies are made up of People who sell things to People and I do not believe they should be excluded of the same values, morals and responsibilities we expect of our neighbors.


The thing that sticks out, to me, with your example is that "you would know of your neighbor's peanut allergy"...how can companies "know" about the individual needs of their consumers?
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#34 Razzle Dazzle Brazell

 
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Posted 22 August 2012 - 04:07 PM

The thing that sticks out, to me, with your example is that "you would know of your neighbor's peanut allergy"...how can companies "know" about the individual needs of their consumers?


Exactly! :) That is precisely the point in full disclosure. That is why they should list everything on the label or otherwise make the ingredients, processing method and so on attainable in some way.

Even in many schools there are rules about using scented lotions or distributing foods. It is to protect against people having allergic reactions.

In high school, some of these things were banned and others were allowed but with requirement to tell that the fundraising candybar has nuts and so on.

And of course it is worth mentioning that companies Do know that there are people who are allergic to wheat or have celiac or nut allergies and such.

Edited by Razzle Dazzle Brazell, 22 August 2012 - 04:12 PM.

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Gluten and Oat Free 6/'12
Dairy, Corn and Yeast free 7/'12
Nightshade Free, Candida diet & low salicylates 8/'12
Nightshades and carbs and sugars limitedly reintroduced, most salicylates now tolerated 9/'12
No longer Reacting to yeasty breads 10/'12
Test confirmed yeast overgrowth, back on Candida diet 11/'12

You only get one life so make it count.

#35 vln1760

 
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Posted 03 September 2012 - 10:29 AM

I just wanted to say that I understand your frustration. Undisclosed gluten sources have been plaguing my life for the last year or so. I agree that food companies cannot always produce gluten-free products (and I'm not even suggesting that they change their manufacturing processes or ingredient lists), but there really does need to be better labeling of this serious allergen for those of us who are super-sensitive!
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#36 Gemini

 
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Posted 05 September 2012 - 10:22 AM

I, like Gemini, have not really had any trouble finding safe foods. I always read every single ingredient every time I purchase a product, even if I've purchased it a hundred times before - this has saved me from a number of glutonings. I buy all of my food from the regular store aisles, not from the "specialty" aisles, with the exception of two products that I order online (bread and pretzels). I have been doing this for years with no problems, and I am severely sensitive to gluten. It will double me over in intense pain within fifteen or twenty minutes of eating. I have never purchased an item that did not list gluten in the ingredients that made me sick. But I took the time to learn how food is made and what ingredients could be a risk to me. I have no problem passing on products that I'm not a hundred percent sure about.

The issue with labeling gluten is much more complex than a lot of people realize. It's far more than just not wanting to do it or not wanting to spend money on ink. The problem is that the companies are buying whatever fillers and starch they can afford, and sometimes it's wheat and sometimes it's corn and sometimes it's potato. Requiring that they label wheat on the ingredient is a major issue because it would require that the company choose the starch or filler that they will always use, which means they are forced to always buy the same product even if the price becomes far higher. Or they can print different labels for every batch of their food that's created, but that's much more expensive than you would think. It saves everyone (including consumers) a lot of money to allow some of these things to not be marked on the label. It would be great if everything didn't revolve around money, but there's nothing we can do to change that. Pestering the companies will only result in them adding labels to all of their food that it may contain wheat just to be safe from getting hounded by gluten free advocates.

I wish labeling was clearer, but I don't expect companies and the government to cater to my needs. I feel that I am perfectly capable of determining what food is and isn't safe for me, and the only foods I've been really uncertain about were foreign foods or really bizarre ingredients. And then I ask or do research before eating it.

In my opinion, the outrageously high prices of certified gluten free products are much more worth getting up in arms about than the mainstream food producers not labeling gluten in the way we'd prefer. Rice is a cheap crop. I can get rice pasta at the local Asian store for about a dollar a box. The rice pasta in the specialty section at my regular grocery store is five to seven times that cost. That upsets me. But mainstream labeling does not.


Finally! Someone else who takes responsibility for what they eat and figuring it out for themselves, not expecting the government to babysit us and tell us how to think. ;)

Food companies are giving people in this country what they want....cheap food. Americans eat what is sold because it's cheap and tastes good to them. Having wheat so heavily subsidized in this country ensures that. So, as long as mainstream America eats the way they do, this is what will be offered. It is up to each and every individual to figure out what is healthy or not and choose accordingly. You are going to have to pay more to eat this way but I always feel it's an investment in health.
Gluten is not undisclosed in foods, unless it happens to be barley as a sweetener and then you have to learn how that is represented on the label. If I can figure all this out myself, anyone can. American Celiacs, for the most part, are not being poisoned by food companies due to hidden gluten. Sure, there are CC risks but that is going to happen in any country where food is prepared outside the home. I don't eat the vast majority of mainstream food and that is why I recovered so well. Educate yourselves and you'll be far better off than expecting the government to do it for you.
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#37 kittty

 
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Posted 06 September 2012 - 06:52 AM

Educate yourselves and you'll be far better off than expecting the government to do it for you.


But what happens if companies start to deliberately hide what is in our food, and the government does nothing about it? They're already doing it with GMOs. It's no secret that the FDA is controlled by corporations, and not the consumers it's supposed to represent. The ONLY reason the USA doesn't have the same stringent standards as the EU is because of corporate control over the government. Without speaking up about it, it may only get worse.

Sorry to sound like a conspiracy theorist, but after growing up in Europe I'm disgusted with the food labeling standards in this country. There is no legitimate reason why they can't be improved.
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#38 tom

 
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Posted 06 September 2012 - 02:00 PM

Well said, kittty. ;)
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>>>>>>> tom <<<<<<<

Celiac 1st diagnosed as a toddler, in the 60s. Docs then, between bloodletting & leech-tending, said "he'll grow out of it" & I was back on gluten & mostly fine for 30yrs.

Gluten-free since 12-03
Dairy-free since 10-04
Soy-free since 5-07

#39 beebs

 
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Posted 06 September 2012 - 02:28 PM

really don't see that is that big a deal changing the labels on food to include a statement about gluten "this food contains gluten", "this food may contain traces of gluten". I for one am very thankful that I live in a place that has labels like that on all food made in this country.
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HLA DQ8, gluten-free since January 2011




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