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Gluten-Free Label But Wheat In Ingredients List
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Hi guys,

I'm a little confused. I live in NZ where apparently the food laws are very strict when it comes to labelling a product gluten-free - it must have no detectable traces of gluten. So I bought Sakata rice crackers (seaweed) as it had a gluten-free sign on the front. Started eating it then noticed that under soy sauce, where was wheat in there!

So, is there some sort of processing method that removes the gluten from it and it is actually gluten-free??

Appreciate your input =)

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Hi guys,

I'm a little confused. I live in NZ where apparently the food laws are very strict when it comes to labelling a product gluten-free - it must have no detectable traces of gluten. So I bought Sakata rice crackers (seaweed) as it had a gluten-free sign on the front. Started eating it then noticed that under soy sauce, where was wheat in there!

So, is there some sort of processing method that removes the gluten from it and it is actually gluten-free??

Appreciate your input =)

There are a few little exceptions. I'm Aus but I think the laws are similar. The wheat could be from glucose syrup and if that's the case then it is gluten free due to the processing method. In Australia gluten free on a label overides any listing of wheat as it means the processing method has removed the gluten. They still declare the wheat though as some people who are very sensitive can't tolerate it.

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Food Standards Australia New Zealand [FSANZ] is a bi-national Government agency that administer the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code in both countries.

As to labelling: wheat is an allergen that is required by law to be included on the label of any food that it is in ... regardless ..

Food Standards defines gluten free as

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Some naturally fermented soy sauce gets broken down by the cultures to where the gluten is below detection limits. Problem is, the tests don't work right on broken-down gluten so you can't really know whether the soy sauce is safe. Since the laws don't take the subtleties of gluten testing into account they can be legally labeled gluten-free. I personally wouldn't eat them.

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I found this on their site:

http://www.sakata.uk.com/gluten-free.htm

I don't really understand what they mean by: "the wheat proteins are removed or de-natured by the soy sauce manufacturing process and therefore there is no longer any detectable gluten present."

That makes it sound like any soy sauce would be ok.

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I found this on their site:

http://www.sakata.uk.com/gluten-free.htm

I don't really understand what they mean by: "the wheat proteins are removed or de-natured by the soy sauce manufacturing process and therefore there is no longer any detectable gluten present."

That makes it sound like any soy sauce would be ok.

As I said above, "not detectable" assumes the test for gluten works reliably on soy sauce. It doesn't. Eat at your own risk.

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sakata are a well known gluten free brand, they process the wheat so highly that there is no gluten detected. We have very strict laws so it has to be under 3ppm. We eat sakata stuff all the time.

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If you can tolerate distilled alcohol then you should be alright with this product. Funny how when I read this I think of Kikkoman. Their soy sauce contains wheat but is distilled and considered gluten-free. They released a statement about this some time ago and I've read quite a bit about the controversy. After this happened they then released a gluten-free soy sauce, probably more out of spite then actual concern. I've heard that on the gluten-free test kits (which I've never purchased only heard about) people claim Kikkoman is completely safe, the regular one I mean. Meanwhile their gluten-free soy sauce is almost double the price.

It is different for every person and that is why I don't come on here often because all I see are posts about people eating gluten-free food and getting glutened. It is very depressing. Again, if you can tolerate distilled alcohol then you should be fine with this product. Personally, I think they should come out with a blood test to see if you got glutened, one that you can do at home. Now that would be interesting.

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> "the wheat proteins are removed or de-natured by the soy sauce manufacturing process and therefore there is no longer any detectable gluten present."

> That makes it sound like any soy sauce would be ok.

I would call bullshit on that - not you what they put on their site. If that were true I would not get searing pains and all that other fun stuff that comes along with having Celiac. Plus if every other brand of soy sauce in the world does not make the claim that their soy sauc eis gluten free, I think they are just doing an end run around the laws to make their product Gluten free so that more people will buy it.

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