Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Gluten-Free Label But Wheat In Ingredients List
0

9 posts in this topic

Hi guys,

I'm a little confused. I live in NZ where apparently the food laws are very strict when it comes to labelling a product gluten-free - it must have no detectable traces of gluten. So I bought Sakata rice crackers (seaweed) as it had a gluten-free sign on the front. Started eating it then noticed that under soy sauce, where was wheat in there!

So, is there some sort of processing method that removes the gluten from it and it is actually gluten-free??

Appreciate your input =)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Hi guys,

I'm a little confused. I live in NZ where apparently the food laws are very strict when it comes to labelling a product gluten-free - it must have no detectable traces of gluten. So I bought Sakata rice crackers (seaweed) as it had a gluten-free sign on the front. Started eating it then noticed that under soy sauce, where was wheat in there!

So, is there some sort of processing method that removes the gluten from it and it is actually gluten-free??

Appreciate your input =)

There are a few little exceptions. I'm Aus but I think the laws are similar. The wheat could be from glucose syrup and if that's the case then it is gluten free due to the processing method. In Australia gluten free on a label overides any listing of wheat as it means the processing method has removed the gluten. They still declare the wheat though as some people who are very sensitive can't tolerate it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Food Standards Australia New Zealand [FSANZ] is a bi-national Government agency that administer the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code in both countries.

As to labelling: wheat is an allergen that is required by law to be included on the label of any food that it is in ... regardless ..

Food Standards defines gluten free as

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some naturally fermented soy sauce gets broken down by the cultures to where the gluten is below detection limits. Problem is, the tests don't work right on broken-down gluten so you can't really know whether the soy sauce is safe. Since the laws don't take the subtleties of gluten testing into account they can be legally labeled gluten-free. I personally wouldn't eat them.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found this on their site:

http://www.sakata.uk.com/gluten-free.htm

I don't really understand what they mean by: "the wheat proteins are removed or de-natured by the soy sauce manufacturing process and therefore there is no longer any detectable gluten present."

That makes it sound like any soy sauce would be ok.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




I found this on their site:

http://www.sakata.uk.com/gluten-free.htm

I don't really understand what they mean by: "the wheat proteins are removed or de-natured by the soy sauce manufacturing process and therefore there is no longer any detectable gluten present."

That makes it sound like any soy sauce would be ok.

As I said above, "not detectable" assumes the test for gluten works reliably on soy sauce. It doesn't. Eat at your own risk.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sakata are a well known gluten free brand, they process the wheat so highly that there is no gluten detected. We have very strict laws so it has to be under 3ppm. We eat sakata stuff all the time.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can tolerate distilled alcohol then you should be alright with this product. Funny how when I read this I think of Kikkoman. Their soy sauce contains wheat but is distilled and considered gluten-free. They released a statement about this some time ago and I've read quite a bit about the controversy. After this happened they then released a gluten-free soy sauce, probably more out of spite then actual concern. I've heard that on the gluten-free test kits (which I've never purchased only heard about) people claim Kikkoman is completely safe, the regular one I mean. Meanwhile their gluten-free soy sauce is almost double the price.

It is different for every person and that is why I don't come on here often because all I see are posts about people eating gluten-free food and getting glutened. It is very depressing. Again, if you can tolerate distilled alcohol then you should be fine with this product. Personally, I think they should come out with a blood test to see if you got glutened, one that you can do at home. Now that would be interesting.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> "the wheat proteins are removed or de-natured by the soy sauce manufacturing process and therefore there is no longer any detectable gluten present."

> That makes it sound like any soy sauce would be ok.

I would call bullshit on that - not you what they put on their site. If that were true I would not get searing pains and all that other fun stuff that comes along with having Celiac. Plus if every other brand of soy sauce in the world does not make the claim that their soy sauc eis gluten free, I think they are just doing an end run around the laws to make their product Gluten free so that more people will buy it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,641
    • Total Posts
      921,554
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Thanks for the replies so far everyone, much appreciated Great, another doctor gets it wrong, how many more times can they make a mess of this diagnosis process?! Bloating had gone down a bit in these first few days of cutting the gluten so I guess expect that to come back. It's one way to have a farewell tour of the gluten foods I guess - if a little or a lot makes no difference may as well go all-in... Believe me I've read that newbie thread multiple times, as well as numerous others around the web. Been doing nothing but since Tuesday when the blood test results came back and each time I go into the comments sections a little bit more of me gives up inside. Seems so many don't ever heal and so many associated complications too. The reality looks bleak apart from a lucky few it seems. The vegetarian choice is non-negotiable, it's a core part of what I believe and the thought of eating any form of animal \ fish flesh would make me physically sick (sorry meat eaters) so will have to find some way around it, how I don't know yet. Perhaps lots of this... http://www.pulsin.co.uk/pea-protein-isolate.html The cooking bit is a concern as it's something none of us do well at home, adds to the feeling of being completely lost right now. I kick myself for the decision that lead to the stress as I could've avoided all this. The only thing I can cling onto there is that I was having some pains in the side before that time which I blamed on a muscle strain... maybe that was the early stages, in which case I could feel a bit better knowing it had just come on gradually.
    • Welcome to the board. Celiac is not a death sentence by any means. I was undiagnosed from age 4 to age 46. Words can not describe the hell of the last 15 years before I was finally diagnosed. I am alive and healthier than I have ever been. There are others who also went years and are now doing well. There are some who had complications of cuorse but not everyone does. Thankfully it sounds like your doctors have found this relatively early. You should recover in time. Do be sure to read that Newbie thread and if you can get the others you live with to read it also. You can live safely in a mixed house but you to have to take precautions to be safe. As the others stated you do need to get back on gluten until all celiac related testing is done.  You don't have to eat a lot but if your going to get biopsies done you do have to have some daily. Most of all try to relax. Having celiac does take some getting used to but you will be okay.
    • Hi Kasia2016, Yes, celiac disease symptoms can vary widely.  Some people have no symptoms, we call that silent celiac.  Other have difficulty walking (gluten ataxia), skin rashes (dermatitis herpetiformis), and thyroid disease (Hashimoto's thyroiditis).  The list goes on and on.  GI symptoms can vary widely too, from mild symptoms at times to severe symptoms.
    • Hi egs1707, Welcome to the forum! Irene is right, you should not be gluten-free until all testing is completed.  The celiac disease tests are checking for immune system reactions and damage, and when you go gluten-free that starts to decline.  So the tests may not show the true immune reaction that is going on or the normal damage.  They may not show any damage in fact and you could get a false negative diagnosis.  You body starts healing and out the window go the test results.  Your doctor gets an "F" grade if they told you to go gluten-free now. But you aren't alone in having a doctor who doesn't understand the celiac disease testing process.  Many of them are woefully ignorant of proper testing for celiac disease.  That why the current estimate is somewhere in the range of 85% of celiacs in the USA are undiagnosed.  It doesn't help when doctors screw up the testing themselves.  Or refuse to test people.  Which is also far too common. I was vegetarian for 5 years.  I am not anymore and don't recommend it.  It is hard enough living gluten-free and finding safe food to eat and adequate nutrition for healing a damaged body.  I used to eat a lot of soy products when I Was vegetarian, but now soy makes me physically sick.  We can sometimes develop reactions to foods we eat a lot of while our guts are inflamed IMHO.  Soy is not a healthy food anyway from my reading. I can't do dairy now but may people who start out lactose intolerant end up being able to eat dairy after they have recovered. The best advice I can give is to avoid as much processed food as you can, and eat mostly whole foods you cook yourself at home.  When you do cook, cook big, and freeze the leftovers.  That way you can quickly take a small portion of food out of the freezer and reheat it.  Being celiac it is more important to learn how to cook.  Unless you are wealthy all those gluten-free processed foods add up quick.  Plus gluten-free processed foods often are lacking in fiber and vitamins. You'll want to watch out for vitamin deficiencies also.  Since celiac disease damages the villi in the small intestine, the vitamins and minerals etc are not digested and absorbed well.  So celiacs can be low on vitamin D, calcium,  and one other one I forget.  Vitamin B-12 may be low also ( it is important for nerve health).  Then there are some vitamins that vegetarians tend to have problems getting enough of also to consider. Adjusting to living with celiac disease means adjusting to a new diet and some lifestyle changes.  There's lots of us that make that change every year though, it's not impossible.  You will most likely end up eating better, more nutritious food than many of your peers.  And you will avoid a pletora of additional health concerns that can come along with untreated celiac disease. Learning to cook can be an adventure and you may enjoy it once you start.  you may find your taste in foods changes once you have been gluten-free for a while too. Recovery from celiac disease can take some months.  The immune system is very serious about protecting us and doesn't give up quickly.  Also it always remembers so it will react to even small amounts of gluten.  I live with gluten eaters at home and I do fine.  I just am careful about rinsing dishes off and so forth before using them. There is a Newbie 101 thread at the top of the coping with forum subsection.  It may provide some helpful info.  
    • That's great to hear you are feeling better Nightsky.  I really think when our GI systems are in distress already that it doesn't take much to set off symptoms.  Once I eliminated the other foods that cause me symptoms that helped a lot too.  And added some extra vitamin D to my diet and selenium. Many of us have developed reactions to other foods besides gluten and need to avoid them to keep symptoms at bay.  For me nightshades, carrots, soy, dairy, and celery all cause symptoms.  It took me awhile to figure out all those food culprits, but it made a big difference getting them out of my diet. But we are all individuals, and our bodies react individually.  So you may or may not have additional food intolerances develop. Celiac is one of those life journey things and we learn as we go.  Just keep the bottle of aspirin handy!
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,644
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Jross69
    Joined